Gesamtzahl der Seitenaufrufe

Follower

Mittwoch, 18. Oktober 2017

Court stalls new coal plant in South Africa

Court stalls new coal plant in South Africa

Civil society has used many forms of activism to push for a transition to a greener electrical grid in South Africa. This year, they’ve taken their battle to the courts, winning two significant rulings. Leonie Joubert takes a look at the case to stop a new coal-fired mega-station north of Johannesburg.
the coal plant at Limpopo in south Africa under construction
Coal in South Africa: could legal action stop construction on another mega-station? (Photo by JMK, edited, CC BY-SA 3.0)

When the Minister of Environmental Affairs approved the environmental application for a proposed new coal-fired power station about four hours’ drive north of Johannesburg, it was not good enough that she did so on the basis that the environmental impact assessment (EIA) merely listed the size of the power plant’s projected carbon emissions, the regional High Court ruled in March 2017. The minister should also have taken into consideration the likely impacts of the climatic changes that would result from this power plant’s considerable greenhouse gas emissions, before giving her departmental go-ahead. By approving the EIA, the Department of Energy (DoE) would then have been able give the final approval of the Thabametsi power plant, which was shortlisted as part of a new state initiative to commission a series of privately built, owned, and run coal power stations.
According to the Centre for Environmental Rights (CER), which supported the plaintiff Earthlife Africa (ELA) in the court bid, the Thabametsi Power Company’s new plant would be one of the largest carbon emitting power stations of its kind globally, not just in South Africa, and would have been as carbon-intensive as the state utility’s current old-technology power plants.
The court overturned the environment minister’s approval, thereby stalling the development of this particular plant. But the wider implications are that all similar new coal power stations that come before the DEA for environmental clearance will need to also show a clear analysis of their anticipated climate change impacts, and how they will offset those.
According to the CER, all similar EIA processes will need to quantify the possible climate change implications, such as the impact on health or water in the vicinity of the plant. It will also have to show whether the viability of the plant will be compromised by climate change – for instance, could water shortages owning to localised extreme drought, worsened by climate change, threaten the plant’s operations?
Ultimately, the EIA must show that it has considered what ‘measures are required to reduce (the plant’s) emissions, and ensure the resilience of the project and the surrounding environment to those impacts’, according to the CER.
The approval of the plant is currently on hold, pending final decisions on various possible courses of action available to both the Departments of Environmental Affairs, and Energy. The deadline for commercial and financial sign-off of the plant is 3 November 2017 and Earthlife Africa is waiting to hear whether the energy department will extend this deadline to accommodate the various delays.
This is the second time this year that civil society has had to turn to the courts to stall a large and risky mega-infrastructure development that had provisionally been approved by the state. In April this year, the High Court in Cape Town overturned the South African government’s agreement to buy nuclear energy generation technology from the Russian government, because the court found that the state had not followed its own procedures around accountability, transparency, and public participation.
Both of these cases show that using legal technicalities and questions of due process to throw a roadblock in the way of the South African government’s approval of new coal or nuclear power stations, is a viable process, even if it is slow and costly. It requires a team of skilled legal practitioners in order to be effective, and considerable funding. But the cases also indicate how potent the courts still are as a mechanism for accountability and transparency in the state approval of big and carbon-intensive infrastructure projects that have implications for how the taxpayers’ money is spent, and how clean and appropriate the technology is that drives the country’s energy economy.
The DoE’s nuclear ambitions would have committed South Africans to paying off a suite of up to six nuclear power stations, capable of generating 9.6 gigawatts (GW) of power, at a cost which the Treasury argued was potentially crippling to the economy.
The Thabametsi power station would have generated the equivalent of nearly 10 million tons of carbon dioxide equivalent (CO2e) per year across its 30 years lifespan. Its greenhouse gas emission intensity of 1.23 tons of CO2e per megawatt hour, would be ‘roughly equivalent, if not slightly worse, than (the country’s) oldest coal-fired power plants’, says the CER.
Neither project is definitively stopped, but at least they have been delayed. In the mean time, political ambitions are shifting, and the cost of renewable power continues to fall, making these coal and nuclear plants increasingly less economically and politically viable.

How Trump could undermine the US solar boom

How Trump could undermine the US solar boom

The US solar industry has been booming, employing far more people than coal and helping cut American emissions. But President Trump’s administration could end up slapping tariffs on imported solar cells and panels. Llewelyn Hughes describes how this will affect the industry.
solar workers installing panels
The proposed measures put 88,000 solar jobs at risk and slows progress toward cutting greenhouse gas emissions (Public Domain)

Tumbling prices for solar energy have helped stoke demand among U.S. homeowners, businesses and utilities for electricity powered by the sun. But that could soon change.
President Donald Trump – whose proposed 2018 budget would slash support for alternative energy – will soon get a new opportunity to undermine the solar power market by imposing duties that could increase the cost of solar power high enough to choke off the industry’s growth.
As scholars of how public policies affect, and are affected by, energy, we have been studying how the solar industry is increasingly global. We also research what this means for who wins and loses from the renewable energy revolution in the U.S. and Europe.
We believe that imposing steep new duties on imported solar equipment would hurt the overall U.S. solar industry. That in turn could discourage choices that slow the pace of climate change.
Trade complaints
A bankrupt manufacturer has petitioned the Trump administration to slap new duties on imported crystalline silicon photovoltaic cells, the basic electricity-producing components of solar panels – along with imported panels, also known as modules.
This case follows earlier and narrower complaints filed by SolarWorld, a German solar manufacturer with a factory in Oregon, that Chinese companies were getting an unfair edge as a result of subsidies and dumping.
Due to those cases, the U.S. has imposed duties on solar panels and their components imported from China and Taiwan. The punitive Chinese tariffs averaged 29.5 percent last year, according to the Greentech Media research firm.
Suniva, a U.S. company that – oddly enough – is majority-owned by a Chinese company, lodged this complaint in April under a rarely activated 1974 Trade Act provision called Section 201. SolarWorld Americas joined in a month later.
The key difference in this new case is that it will potentially lead to tariffs on all imported solar cells and panels, rather than specific kinds from particular countries.
Suniva’s petition calls on the Trump administration to set a 40-cent-per-watt duty on cells and a minimum 78-cent-watt price for panels.
Prior to the complaint, global prices for solar panels had fallen to 34 cents a watt.
Enormous progress
This big increase in import duties could undermine the enormous progress the industry has made in cutting the cost of solar-generated electricity. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory finds that tumbling solar module prices contributed a lot to the 61 percent reduction in the cost of U.S. household solar power systems – typically located on rooftops – between 2010 and 2017.
The Solar Energy Industries Association, which represents the sector in the U.S., calculates a blended average price that takes residential, commercial and utility-scale systems into account. It finds prices fell more sharply, dropping by more than 73 percent during that period.
Likewise, the Energy Department’s SunShot Initiative declared in September that U.S. utility-scale solar systems were already generating electricity at the competitive rate of 6 cents per kilowatt-hour – three years ahead of the program’s ambitious target for 2020. Falling costs for solar panels played a big part in helping the industry hit this milestone ahead of time.
The International Trade Commission issued a preliminary finding on Sept. 22 that imported cells and panels are “substantial cause of serious injury, or threat of serious injury” to domestic manufacturers. The independent, bipartisan U.S. agency will hold a hearing on Oct. 3 to explore ways to respond.
Regardless of what remedies the commission recommends, the White House would get broad powers to increase the cost of imported solar cells and panels to at least theoretically protect Suniva.
Jeopardizing jobs
Imposing duties on imported solar equipment will not help the U.S. industry as a whole. Like most experts, we believe that the remedy sought in this case will make solar power more expensive for businesses and consumers, which will reduce its competitiveness against other sources of energy.
Imposing new import duties also ignores the fact that the U.S. solar industry employs an estimated 260,000 people in installation, manufacturing, sales and other related activities, according to the Solar Foundation, but only a small fraction of these workers are involved in cell production.
Protecting certain manufacturers would thus come at the costs of harming other parts of the industry. The Solar Energy Industries Association, which opposes Suniva’s petition, estimates that 88,000 jobs may be at risk. Steep duties could thus undermine the contribution solar power makes to the U.S. economy.
Solar globalization
Along with ignoring the effects on jobs across the entire industry, the petition misses the bigger picture. Cell and panel manufacturing composes a small part of a much larger industry that takes advantage of the global manufacturing base.
The rise of China as a solar manufacturing hub is an integral part of what has helped drive costs down for installation companies and consumers around the world. Lowering the cost of solar power systems makes solar energy more competitive against more carbon-intensive sources of electricity, including coal-fired power plants.
The growth of solar energy is one factor helping many U.S. states reduce their energy-related greenhouse gas emissions.
Experts disagree about how much the Trump administration’s decision to withdraw from the Paris Agreement on climate change matters, particularly as states like California continue to work hard on reducing their carbon footprints.
But there is no debate over whether imposing duties on imported solar cells and panels would hinder the growth of renewable energy in the U.S. – reversing climate progress.
Timeline and punishment
Section 201 cases differ from more standard trade complaints because they do not require a determination of unfair trade practices. They also open the door to broader trade restrictions to remedy the perceived problem in a given industry.
The International Trade Commission is expected to give the White House its recommendations by Nov. 13. Trump will probably respond within 60 days.
It took decades of research and investment to drive down the cost of solar power to the point where it is competitive with conventional sources of electricity. Should these latest trade woes increase the cost of going solar, it would be likely to kill domestic jobs and slow progress toward cutting greenhouse gas emissions across the nation.
The ConversationEditor’s note: This is an updated version of an article originally published on Sept. 20, 2017.
Llewelyn Hughes, Associate Professor of Public Policy, Australian National University and Jonas Meckling, Assistant Professor of Energy and Environmental Policy, University of California, Berkeley
This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.

The new German government must align the Energiewende with the European Union

The new German government must align the Energiewende with the European Union

Germany has been seen as a leader in renewable energy in the European Union, but there is still a long way to go. To revitalize both European and German energy transitions, Rebecca Bertram proposes three strategies for Germany’s new government to put in place at the EU level: better goals, binding goals, and the long-awaited coal phaseout.
A pile of small paper flags from the EU, Germany, France and the UK
Europe’s energy transition could be more ambitious – Germany can choose now to push it, or watch the EU fall behind (Public Domain)

The German elections last month have lead to drawn-out negotiations between parties to build a coalition.  The most likely result is a “Jamaica” coalition between the Conservatives of Angela Merkel (CDU/CSU – black), the Libertarians (FDP – yellow) and the Greens. But meanwhile, the rest of Europe is discussing how it wants to position itself in terms of climate and energy by 2030.
In Germany, the coalition agreement forms the basis for the following four years of government priorities, and mentions here are important if the government is to prioritize energy and climate. The Heinrich Böll Foundation recently published a strategy memo for Germany’s new government, suggesting that it push the ongoing European energy and climate negotiations forward in order to provide a supporting framework for the country’s own Energiewende.
Germany has set itself the goal of fundamentally transforming its energy system by the middle of this century. By that date, carbon emissions are to be lowered by 80 to 95 percent (compared to 1990 levels) through a set of various measures: energy efficiency and the rapid build-up of renewables. Today, Germany already produces 30 percent of its electricity supply by renewable energy.
Yet Germany’s energy transition can only succeed together with its European neighbors. The reasons for this are manifold: A Europe-wide integrated electricity grid would lower the costs of integrating renewables and offers valuable flexibility options increasingly necessary for the energy system of the future. And only European climate efforts can play a meaningful role in assuming the continent’s international obligations in reaching the Paris climate goals.
As a basis for the European energy and climate discussions, the European Commission laid out a set of eight policy proposals in the “Clean Energy for All Europeans” policy package last November. These will continue to be discussed between the European Commission, the European Parliament and the European Council consisting of the heads of states from all EU member states. Negotiations are likely to last until the next European elections in May 2019, thus it is important that the next German government realizes soon how important the European dimension is to reaching its own Energiewende goals.
The next German government should therefore use these European energy and climate negotiations to set the framework for pushing the German energy transition further.
First, Germany’s new government should step in to raise the proposed Europe-wide energy goals. The transformation of the energy system requires massive investments, and clearly defined goals serve as a main policy instrument to provide such investment security. The European Commission has proposed a Europe-wide goal for renewables of 27 percent and an energy efficiency target of 30 percent by 2030. Yet both of these goals are not ambitious enough to put Europe in line with its Paris climate obligations. The European Parliament has realized this shortcoming and is likely to push for a higher renewables goal as well as a separate long-term goal for the middle of this century. That means that there is still room for maneuvering while these goals are being discussed and finalized between the European Commission, the European Parliament and the individual member states. Germany could play a decisive role in this debate if it builds strong alliances with other progressive EU member states that favor higher targets.
Second, Germany’s new government should push for the inclusion of checks in the system. Energy goals are only useful if they involve mechanisms by which progress can be monitored and ultimately altered. As it stands now, the proposal by the European Commission is not sufficient: it is only binding on the European level, not for individual EU member states. Germany has an interest in maintaining a stable investment climate for renewables and efficiency options that can only be met by goals accompanied by a functioning monitoring system, to stop the European Union of falling short.
Third, Germany’s new government should use the European Commission’s proposals to initiate a national and European coal phase-out. The energy transition will only achieve its climate goals if the rapid build-up of renewables and the deployment of energy efficiency measures are being matched by a gradual retreat of conventional power sources, especially coal. The European Commission has laid out a proposal on how structural change in coal regions throughout Europe can be supported financially, opening a European debate on a continent-wide coal phase-out. These proposals should be used by the new German government as a basis to think through structural change options in affected coal regions in Germany and Europe.
Coalition talks to form the new German government are likely to begin soon. Let’s hope that policymakers realize the importance of the European energy transition when driving its own Energiewende forward, and that this gets a mention in the important coalition agreement.
For those of you who read German, continue reading the full strategy memo here.
Rebecca Bertram leads the European Energy Transition work at the Heinrich Böll Foundation’s Headquarters in Berlin. Her work focuses on integrating the various European energy discussions into the German energy decision-making process.

Encuentro anual de energía fotovoltaica en Chile organizado por la IEA

Encuentro anual de energía fotovoltaica en Chile organizado por la IEA


Representantes de al menos 15 países llegaron hasta la Región de Antofagasta para ser parte de la reunión anual de la Tarea Uno del Programa de Sistemas de Energía Fotovoltaica de la Agencia Internacional de Energía, que se centra en fortalecer los esfuerzos de colaboración internacional que faciliten el papel de la energía solar fotovoltaica como piedra angular en la transición a sistemas de energía sostenibles.
En la ocasión los representantes fueron parte de la Conferencia Científica Nacional ENERSOL 2017, que se realiza cada año en Antofagasta y además, realizaron un recorrido por el Desierto de Atacama, lo que les permitió conocer directamente las condiciones a las que se enfrentan los desarrollos fotovoltaicos de la zona. “Chile tiene un enorme recurso solar por lo que es natural usar esta energía y también tiene industria minera la que puede ser provista de energía limpia también“, indicó Izumi Kaizuka, Directora de RTS Corporation de Japón.
Los participantes concordaron que Chile tiene las mejores condiciones del mundo para continuar con el desarrollo de la energía fotovoltaica. “Hay un potencial tremendo y una gran oportunidad para el país para acelerar la transición energética. Sería una lástima perder la increíble oportunidad que otorga el extremadamente abundante recurso solar en el norte del país”, aseguró Gaetan Masson, Agente Operativo de la Tarea Uno de IEA PVPS.
La Tarea Uno de IEA PVPS tiene como objetivo promover y facilitar el intercambio y la difusión de información sobre los aspectos técnicos, económicos, medioambientales y sociales de los sistemas de energía fotovoltaica. Las actividades de la Tarea Uno respaldan los objetivos más amplios de la PVPS, como contribuir a la reducción de costos de las aplicaciones de energía fotovoltaica, aumentar la conciencia sobre el potencial y el valor de los sistemas de energía fotovoltaica, fomentar la eliminación de barreras técnicas y no técnicas.
Chile se adscribió este año al grupo de treinta y un países que participan del IEA PVPS. Los asistentes analizaron la experiencia del mercado eléctrico nacional que no ha recibido subsidios para su desarrollo, además de los avances en cada uno de los países asistentes. Malasia recibirá la próxima reunión de la Tarea Uno de IEA PVPS para mostrar su modelo de gestión que le ha permitido ser hoy un país productor de celdas y módulos Fotovoltaicos.
También se analizó la generación distribuida y las aplicaciones integradas en la construcción de edificios (BIPV), donde destaca el liderazgo de Europa, también a los vehículos (FV en el transporte), donde el líder es Japón.
La reunión finalizó con una visita técnica a la Planta Jama Solar, ubicada en la comuna de Calama y que destaca por ser la que tiene el mayor factor de planta del mundo.

La fotovoltaica en el mundo: Alemania y Portugal

La fotovoltaica en el mundo: Alemania y Portugal


La subasta para proyectos fotovoltaicos de entre 1750 kW y 10 MW ha alcanzado un nuevo precio récord a la baja: por primera vez, el precio medio ofertado descendió de 0,0500 € /kWh y alcanzó los 0,0491 € /kWh según anunció este lunes la agencia Federal de energía. El precio más bajo asignado ha sido de 0,0429 € / kWh y el más alto de 0,0506 € / kWh. Jochen Homann, presidente de la Agencia Federal de Energía encuentra una explicación: “Espacialmente, los sistemas de gran tamaño no resultan nada caros de construir por los efectos de la escala”.
En la subasta realizada en junio, el precio medio fue de 0,0566 € /kWh. Comparado con la ronda celebrada en febrero, el recargo descendió en un céntimo de euro por kWh, el mayor descenso registrado entre dos subastas.
La agencia informa de que, una vez más, hubo un exceso de ofertas: se presentaron 110 solicitudes con un volumen total de 754 MW. La subasta ha finalizado con un total de 20 proyectos con una capacidad total de 222 MW.
El gobierno portugués, por su parte, está planeando aprobar un nuevo marco regulatorio para el desarrollo de proyectos solares a gran escala. La propuesta de este nuevo plan se menciona brevemente en el borrador de la Ley que aprobará los presupuestos generales del Estado para 2018, según ha publicado el periódico local El Observador. Según el documento, el nuevo plan denominado “Plano Nacional Solar” pretende identificar las áreas del país más propicias para la instalación de grandes plantas y contempla la creación de “un esquema de remuneración basado en los precios del mercado y sin subsidios pagados por los contribuyentes, a lo largo del sistema eléctrico nacional”. No se revela si el nuevo plan incluirá subastas, tal y como ha solicitado la asociación de energías renovables Apren o si solo se creará el marco administrativo y regulatorio para sistemas de gran escala que vendan la energía a precios de mercado a la red local en el modo denominado de “paridad de red”.
Por otro lado, el Secretario portugués de energía Jorge Seguro Sanches publicó ayer en su cuenta de Twitter que ha comenzado la construcción de un parque solar de 46 MW “sin incentivos” en Orique, al sur del país.

Brasil: sector solar quiere 2 GW de contratación anual para la fotovoltaica

Brasil: sector solar quiere 2 GW de contratación anual para la fotovoltaica


En un encuentro con el Ministerio de Energía y Minas que tendrá lugar hoy, la asociación brasileña ABSOLAR pedirá un objetivo anual de 2 GW y la apertura de líneas de crédito competitivas para la solar sobre cubierta.
Los dirigentes de la Associação Brasileira de Energia Solar Fotovoltaica (ABSOLAR) se reunirán hoy con el Ministro de Energía y Minas de Brasil, Fernando Coelho, con el fin de presentar una serie de propuestas para el desarrollo del sector fotovoltaico del país.
Las propuestas de la asociación incluyen un objetivo de contratación anual de la fotovoltaica a gran escala de 2 GW a través de las subastas del gobierno y una meta nacional de 1 millón de tejados solares en edificios residenciales, comerciales e industriales, así como en edificios públicos o en áreas rurales.
Además, ABSOLAR pedirá al gobierno la creación de condiciones para líneas de crédito competitivas para personas físicas que quieran aprovechar de la generación distribuida y una nueva política industrial para reducir ulteriormente los precios de los sistemas fotovoltaicos.
“La fuente solar fotovoltaica atraviesa una fuerte expansión en el mundo, pero enfrentó obstáculos en Brasil en los últimos diez años que perjudicaron su crecimiento, dejando al país con 15 años de retraso en el desarrollo del sector. Para recuperar el tiempo perdido y acelerar el desarrollo de esta fuente renovable, limpia, sostenible y de bajo impacto ambiental en nuestro país, ABSOLAR trae al Gobierno Federal una propuesta estructurada de programa nacional para el sector “, destacó el presidente ejecutivo de ABSOLAR, Rodrigo Sauaia.
A principios de agosto, cuando el gobierno brasileño anunció la exclusión de la solar de uno de las dos subastas de energía que se celebrarán en diciembre, ABSOLAR emitió un comunicado para criticar esta decisión. En una entrevista realizada con pv magazine a principios de octubre, Sauaia reiteró las críticas al gobierno, afirmando que no existía ninguna justificación razonable para la exclusión discriminatoria de la fuente solar fotovoltaica de la subasta A-6. “Los argumentos dados por el gobierno”, dijo Sauaia, “de que la implementación de la tecnología es rápida y de que sería difícil calcular los precios de la energía a más largo plazo, no tienen fundamento técnico ni económico. La fuente solar fotovoltaica no solo tiene la misma velocidad de implementación que la fuente eólica, que fue incluida en la subasta A-6, sino que a menudo se contrata para ser entregada en 5 años, modelo aplicado en diversos países. Incluso en Brasil, la fuente solar fotovoltaica ya participó en el pasado en dos subastas A-5. Eso significa que no hay respaldo histórico para esta medida. Consideramos que la decisión fue un error grave, que debe evitarse en el futuro.”
En la entrevista, además, Sauia dijo que el objetivo de 2 GW representa un volumen capaz de promover el adecuado desarrollo de los diferentes eslabones de la cadena productiva de la fuente.

Empowered by Light, Sunrun y Givepower se alían con los bomberos para suministrar solar y agua a Puerto rico

Empowered by Light, Sunrun y Givepower se alían con los bomberos para suministrar solar y agua a Puerto rico


Dos organizaciones sin ánimo de lucro, Empowered by Light y Givepower, junto con Sunrun, la mayor empresa dedicada a la solar residencial de Estados Unidos que también ofrece servicios de almacenamiento, Zero Mass Water, varios voluntarios individuales y dos jefes de bomberos, se han unido para suministrar electricidad y agua a la isla.
Un comunicado de prensa remitido por la empresa norteamericana relata cómo Empowered by Light ha organizado esta acción en respuesta a las noticias de que la mayoría de la isla sigue sin electricidad y más del 50 % de Puerto Rico no dispone de agua potable tras ser devastado por huracanes.
La acción, que también cuenta con el apoyo del jefe de bomberos de San Juan, Alberto Cruz, y el de LasVegas, Richard Birt, prevé el suministro y la instalación de microrredes en dos estaciones de bomberos de la isla, así como de tres sistemas de desalinización de agua activados con energía solar, cinco novedosos sistemas de producción de agua y tres unidades fotovoltaicas portátiles que se instalarán en comunidades alejadas.
El primer sistema solar , una instalación de 4 kW con baterías, se instaló el pasado 12 de octubre e la estación Barrio Obrero de San Juan. El día 13 se instaló la segunda en otra estación de bomberos, y en estos días se están instalando los sistemas de desalinización de agua.
“Parece ser que la respuesta federal para devolver la energía a la isla se basa en diésel”, afirma Marco Krapels, que encabezó la iniciativa y es confundador de Empowered by Light. “Queremos usar proyectos reales con impacto inmediato para demostrar que la tecnología basada en energía renovable está disponible desde ya y es una alternativa mucho más resistente que el diésel.”
Empowered by Light, una organización estadounidense sin ánimo de lucro, ha desarrollado proyectos de solar en siete países, entre los que se cuentan proyectos en colegios , centros de conservación y comunidades indígenas.
Giwepower pretende que las renovables sean accesibles a todo el mundo. Ha suministrado acceso a energías limpias a comunidades de todo el planeta.

Según un informe de la industria nuclear, las renovables desplazan a la energía atómica

Según un informe de la industria nuclear, las renovables desplazan a la energía atómica


Mientras que las subastas de energía renovable siguen batiendo récords de precios a la baja que oscilan los 30 dólares / MWh en Chile, México, Marruecos, emiratos Árabes Unidos y EE. UU., han cesado las inversiones en centrales nucleares y solo se inició la construcción de tres en 2016: el número de nuevos proyectos en todo el mundo ha caído esta década a raíz del desastre de Fukushima en 2011 y también debido al aumento de los costes de la energía atómica, con sólo tres nuevas plantas en 2016, dos en China y una en Pakistán (construida por una empresa china), con una capacidad total de 3 GW. El informe identifica cinco grandes países generadores: Estados Unidos, Francia, China, Rusia y Corea del Sur, que generaron el 70 % de la electricidad mundial en 2016.
Por otro lado, Rusia y Estados Unidos cerraron reactores en 2016, mientras que Suecia y Corea del Sur cerraron sus unidades más antiguas en el primer semestre de 2017, subrayando que el cambio de liderazgo político, como el de Corea del Sur, donde el nuevo presidente ya cerró una planta y suspendió la construcción de otras dos, puede traer cambios radicales para el sector nuclear.
Además, se prevé que los bajos precios de las energías renovables, que se han abaratado un 90 % desde 2009,harán disminuir aún más la participación de la energía nuclear en los próximos años.
El informe señala que, tras un máximo histórico de más de 310.000 millones de dólares en 2015, la inversión mundial en nueva capacidad de generación de electricidad basada en energía renovable cayó a unos 240.000 millones de dólares. Sin embargo, WNISR2017 subraya que la caída del 23% en el volumen de inversión refleja principalmente la rápida reducción del costo por GW, ya que la generación renovable se está volviendo más barata que las nuevas centrales nucleares en la mayoría de las regiones del mundo.
La parte más decisiva de este informe se recoge en la sección final “Energía nuclear frente a desarrollo de las energías renovables”. En ella se revela que desde 1997, en todo el mundo, la energía renovable ha producido cuatro veces más kilovatios-hora de electricidad que la energía nuclear.

La fotovoltaica en el mundo: Taiwán y Europa

La fotovoltaica en el mundo: Taiwán y Europa


Los grandes fabricantes de células taiwaneses Neo Solar Power (NSP), Gintech y Solartech han cesado hoy lunes 16 su actividad el mercado de valores de Taiwán, y todos los rumores apuntan a que las tres empresas podrían fusionarse en una. De ser así, se crearía el mayor fabricante de células de Taiwán, con una capacidad de producción de más de 4,5 GW. Se espera que esta semana las tres empresas hagan un comunicado oficial, pero las fuentes de pv magazine en Taiwán hablan de una fusión o de la creación de una “súper liga de células solares”. Las tres empresas cuentan con unidades de producción en otros países (Tailandia, Vietnam y Malasia) y tienen experiencia en la fabricación de células mono, multi y PERC. Los tres fabricantes han tenido una situación difícil en la primera mitad de año: NSP, por ejemplo, obtuvo unos ingresos de 144,5 millones de dólares, un importe 57,9 % inferior al del año anterior. Por su parte, Gintech solo ha visto descender sus ingresos en un 30 %. Por otro lado, los expertos alertan de que China está alcanzando a Taiwán y que el “desnivel de conocimiento” que existía entre ambos países se está nivelando y es de apenas unos meses.
El Vicepresidente de la Comisión Europea Maroš Šefčovic anunció la pasada semana la creación de una nueva iniciativa de alianza de baterías denominada “Airbus para baterías”. Su lanzamiento se produjo el 11 de octubre y contó con la asistencia de la UE y una seria de grandes empresas alemanas entre las que se cuentan el fabricante de coches Daimler, la empresa de ingeniería Siemens y el grupo químico BASF. El fabricante de coches francés Renault también fue invitado al acto que pretende promover un consorcio para mejorar la competitividad del sector. “La falta de una base de fabricación de células para baterías europea perjudica la posición de los clientes industriales europeos debido a posibles carencias de la cadena de suministros, el aumento de costes derivado del transporte, retrasos en el suministro, control de calidad menos eficiente o limitaciones en el diseño”, dijo Šefčovic. “Por ello, debemos actuar rápido y conjuntamente para superar esta desventaja competitiva y capitalizar nuestro liderazgo en muchos sectores de la cadena de valor de las baterías, desde los materiales hasta la integración del sistema y el reciclaje”. Se cree que las tecnologías de almacenamiento formarán un pilar vital en la transición de energía europea. La Comisión Europea afirmó que adoptará un plan estratégico el próximo año y podría contar con el apoyo de fondos de la EU por valor de 2,2 mil millones de euros. Los mayores fabricantes de baterías se en encuentran en Corea (LG, Samsung), china (BYD, CATL), Japón (NEC; Panasonic) Y América (TESLA).

Científicos estadounidenses desarrollan un nuevo proceso para fabricar semiconductores de unos pocos átomos de grosor

Científicos estadounidenses desarrollan un nuevo proceso para fabricar semiconductores de unos pocos átomos de grosor


Investigadores de la Universidad de Chicago y de la Universidad Cornell afirman que han desarrollado un nuevo método para fabricar semiconductores de unos pocos átomos de grosor.
Según un estudio publicado en la revista científica Nature, el nuevo método permitirá a científicos e ingenieros desarrollar un procedimiento sencillo y económico para que las capas de semiconductores sean más finas, lo cual tendría aplicaciones en campos como la fabricación de células solares y de teléfonos móviles, entre otras muchas.
A pesar de ello, el equipo de investigadores dice que el prometedor procedimiento es aún muy delicado, pues permite poco margen de error. “La escala del problema la que nos estamos enfrentando es como si quisiéramos desenrollar una capa de plástico del tamaño de Chicago sin que se formar ninguna burbuja de aire”, dijo Jiwoong Park, catedrático del Departamento de Química de una Universidad de Chicago, que dirige el estudio. “Cuando el grosor del material de apenas unos átomos, cualquiera de ellos que se desvíe es un problema”.
Los científicos también afirman que las capas de material que han creado pueden desmontarse y colgarse y zona demás compatibles con agua y superficies plásticas, lo cual facilitará su integración con sistemas avanzados ópticos y mecánicos.
El equipo afirma que espera que el nuevo método acelere la creación de nuevos materiales y posibilite la fabricación a gran escala.

El Salvador anuncia un nuevo descenso de las tarifas eléctricas

El Salvador anuncia un nuevo descenso de las tarifas eléctricas


La Superintendencia General de Electricidad y Telecomunicaciones (Siget) ha anunciado a través de un comunicado que la tarifa de la electricidad bajará un 4,4 por ciento en el trimestre comprendido entre el 15 de octubre de 2017 al 14 de enero de 2018.
La nueva reducción se suma a la baja de un 3,09 por ciento que la Siget había ya aplicado para el trimestre comprendido entre el 15 de julio y el 15 de octubre, totalizando así una reducción de un 7,5 por ciento en dos trimestres.
Las reducciones fueron aplicadas conforme al artículo 90 del Reglamento de la Ley General de Electricidad que impone un ajuste de las tarifas cada tres meses según las variaciones de los costos de producción de la energía eléctrica.
“El precio de la energía a trasladar a las tarifas términos promedios totales se reduce de $119,80 el megavatio hora (MWh) a $114,52/MWh”, dijo la Siget en su comunicado. “Dentro de los factores que explican dicha disminución se encuentra el incremento significativo en la participación de la generación hidroeléctrica en las inyecciones totales, que pasó del 22,9 % en el trimestre anterior (abril – junio) a 39,6 % en el trimestre julio – septiembre. Además, se ha mantenido la participación de la energía fotovoltaica con un 1,8 % y la energía geotérmica mantiene una producción constante con una participación del 22,2 %”.
Según la Siget, la mayor participación de la generación renovable e importaciones hicieron posible la reducción de las tarifas, a pesar de un incremento del precio del combustible para generación térmica en el trimestre julio – septiembre.
El pasado mes de abril se conectó a la red del país una planta fotovoltaica de 60 megavatios, que es la segunda fase del proyecto fotovoltaico Providencia Solar, de 101 megavatios. Esa nueva potencia fue también responsable del incremento de producción de fuentes renovables y, consecuentemente, de la reducción de tarifas.
La francesa Neoen se adjudicó el proyecto en una subasta a un precio de 101,9 dólares estadounidenses el megavatio hora. Según el Consejo Nacional de Energía (CNE) del país centroamericano, este precio es un 18 por ciento más bajo que el precio de 123,6 dólares estadounidenses el megavatio hora que se registró en el primer trimestre de 2017 en El Salvador.

Jetzt wird’s ungemütlich!

Jetzt wird’s ungemütlich!


Preiswerte poly- und vor allem monokristalline Solarmodule sind zwar nach wie vor nicht in ausreichendem Maße verfügbar und daher schwer zu finden, aber das ist mit der Artikelüberschrift gar nicht gemeint – mehr dazu aber später. Die Preise sind im letzten Monat zwar nicht mehr gestiegen, ein Ende der Preisstagnation und ein dauerhafter Abwärtstrend sind aber auch noch nicht in Sicht. Zwar wurden die Karten von der EU-Kommission neu gemischt und eine schrittweise Absenkung der Mindestimportpreise verkündet, dies macht sich aber in der kurzfristigen Preisentwicklung noch nicht bemerkbar. Auch ist der Run auf strafzollfreie Module in den USA noch nicht beendet. Alle warten gespannt auf die Empfehlungen der Internationalen Handelskommission (ITC) zum 13. November und die darauffolgende Entscheidung des US-amerikanischen Präsidenten.
Dass dieser sich gegen die Empfehlungen der ITC und gegen eine Ausweitung der protektionistischen Maßnahmen entscheidet, gilt so gut wie ausgeschlossen. Aktuell kämpfen die unterschiedlichen Lager in den USA noch um die konkrete Ausgestaltung der Empfehlungen. Mehr oder weniger stichhaltige Argumente für oder wider eine Abschottung des Marktes werden ausgetauscht. Tatsache ist, dass sowohl das in Schieflage geratene und die Petition initiierende Unternehmen Suniva, also auch SolarWord America, das sich beinahe selbstverständlich für weitere Schutzmaßnahmen ausspricht, bisher nicht viele Vorteile aus den seit 2012 in den USA und seit 2013 in der EU geltenden Importbeschränkungen für asiatische Produkte ziehen konnten. Unstrittig dürfte auch sein, dass – sollte sich der von Suniva geforderte Mindestpreis von 0,74 US-Dollar pro Watt für alle neu eingeführten Solarmodule durchsetzen – der Photovoltaik-Boom in den USA ein jähes Ende finden würde.
Von solchen Phantasiepreisen sind wir hier in Europa zum Glück weit entfernt. Die EU-Kommission hat kürzlich eine neue Durchführungsverordnung erlassen. Ab Oktober gilt für polykristalline Module ein Mindestimportpreis von 0,37 Euro pro Watt und für monokristalline Module eine untere Marke von 0,42 Euro pro Watt. Diese Werte sollen dann vierteljährlich um jeweils zwei Eurocent gesenkt werden. Man hat sich offenbar dazu entschlossen, zwischen mono- und polykristallinen Zellen zu unterscheiden, um den Import der unterschiedlichen Typen besser kontrollieren zu können. Zu welchen absonderlichen Effekten und Komplikationen das noch führen wird, bleibt abzuwarten. Interessanter ist im Moment, was mit Modulen von Herstellern passiert, die das Undertaking und damit die Verpflichtung, sich einem Mindestpreis zu unterwerfen, bereits freiwillig verlassen haben. Es handelt sich dabei um beinahe alle namhaften chinesischen Modulhersteller.
Aktuell ist noch nicht ganz klar, ob diese (Tier-1-)Hersteller nun zurückkehren in das Undertaking oder ob eine neue interessante Variante angewendet werden soll, nämlich die Erhebung einer Steuer(!) durch den Zoll, die die Lücke zwischen dem angestrebten Mindestimportpreis und dem ursprünglichen Zell- oder Modulabgabepreis überbrücken soll. Klingt eigenartig – ist es auch! Wie beim Strafzoll soll es auch hier mögliche sein, im Falle der Nicht-Durchsetzbarkeit beim Hersteller den Importeur oder das jeweils nächste Glied in der Lieferkette zur Kasse zu bitten, bis hin zum Endkunden, also Betreiber. Produkte der chinesischen Firmen, die in der Vergangenheit bei der Umgehung der EU-Richtlinien aufgeflogen sind und aus dem Untertaking unfreiwillig entlassen wurden, werden nach wie vor mit hohen Strafzöllen belegt.
Dass mit europäischen Zöllnern nicht zu scherzen ist und die geltenden Regelungen nicht auf die leichte Schulter zu nehmen sind, zeigen die aktuellen Berichte über Strafverfolgung und Verhaftungen in der Branche. Über die zahlreichen Umgehungsversuche und die mehr oder weniger raffinierten Methoden, mit denen chinesische Module in den europäischen Markt gebracht wurden, hatte ich ja bereits mehrfach berichtet. Bisher fehlten allerdings konkrete Beispiele für erfolgreiche Ermittlungen und harte Durchgriffe seitens der Zollbehörden. Nun gab es ja gleich mehrere Polizeizugriffe und Beschlagnahmungen im Raum Nürnberg, von wo aus chinesische Module der Marken Risen, Sunowe und Sunrise in Umlauf gebracht wurden. Von Unterschlagungen in zwei- bis dreistelliger Millionenhöhe ist die Rede, doch das dürfte nur die Spitze des Eisbergs sein. Nun wird wohl sukzessive aufgearbeitet, woran in den vergangenen Jahren im Hintergrund ermittelt wurde, und es wird wohl noch Jahre bis Jahrzehnte dauern, bis alle Fälle abgeschlossen sind.
Welche Gefahren lauern am Wegesrand? Natürlich geraten in erster Linie die Importeure in die Schusslinie, sofern die Herkunft der eingeführten Module von ihnen nicht lückenlos nachgewiesen werden kann. Hier wird in der Regel sowohl nach einem Herkunftszertifikat für die Module, als auch für die verwendeten Zellen gefragt. Oft genug wurden für den Import von fragwürdigen Modulen aber Scheinfirmen bzw. „Opferlamm“-Gesellschaften gegründet. Diese werden im Problemfall von den Besitzern schnell abgewickelt und sind nicht mehr haftbar zu machen. Der Zoll ist dann berechtigt, sich an den nächsten Abnehmer in der Lieferkette zu wenden, oft einen kleineren Zwischenhändler. Dieser gerät dann in den Verdacht der Steuerhehlerei oder Steuerhinterziehung schuldig zu sein. Also trägt auch ein Abnehmer bereits verzollter Solarmodule (beispielsweise bei DDP-Lieferungen) das Risiko, für nicht korrekt deklarierte Ware haftbar gemacht zu werden.
Wie sollte man sich also verhalten, wenn man preiswerte Module erwerben und nicht gleichzeitig Gefahr laufen möchte, hohen Zoll-Nachforderungen und einer Strafverfolgung ausgesetzt zu sein? – Nun, man kann weiterhin nach Schnäppchen Ausschau halten und zum Beispiel Module mit niedrigeren Leistungen oder Gebrauchtware kaufen. Auch gibt es vereinzelt noch größere Kontingente billiger asiatischer Module auf dem Markt, für die man sich aber vor Vertragsabschluss unbedingt alle Herkunftszertifikate vorlegen lassen sollte, sowie eine Erklärung, dass die Zertifikate auch für die zu liefernde Ware gültig sind. Oder aber man verschiebt seine noch nicht begonnenen Projekte auf das Frühjahr 2018. Denn eines ist sicher: irgendwann in nicht allzu ferner Zukunft wird sich die Situation in den USA geklärt und der Weltmarkt wieder entspannt haben. Dann werden wieder Module in ausreichender Zahl verfügbar sein und die Preise zwangsläufig sinken, zumindest auf das Niveau des dann geltenden Mindestimportpreises.
Übersicht der nach Technologie unterschiedenen Preispunkte im Oktober 2017 inklusive der Veränderungen zum Vormonat:
ModulklassePreis (€/Wp)Veränderung
ggü. Vormonat
Beschreibung
High Efficiency0,51– 1,9 %Kristalline Module ab 280 Wp, mit Cello-, PERC-, HIT-, N-Type- oder Rückseitenkontakt-Zellen oder Kombinationen daraus
All Black0,51  0,0 %Modultypen mit schwarzer Rückseitenfolie, schwarzem Rahmen und einer Nennleistung  zwischen 200 Wp und 275 Wp
Mainstream0,41– 2,4 %Module mit üblicherweise 60-Zellen, Standard-Alurahmen, weißer Rückseitenfolie und 250 Wp bis 275 Wp – sie repräsentieren den Großteil der Module im Markt
Low Cost0,28  0,0 %Minderleistungsmodule, B-Ware, Insolvenzware, Gebrauchtmodule (kristallin), Produkte mit eingeschränkter oder ohne Garantie
(Die dargestellten Preise geben die durchschnittlichen Angebotspreise für verzollte Ware auf dem europäischen Spotmarkt wieder.)

EuPD Research: Energieversorger setzen für Energiewende vor allem auf Photovoltaik

EuPD Research: Energieversorger setzen für Energiewende vor allem auf Photovoltaik


EuPD Research hat das Angebot der in Deutschland tätigen 1252 Energieversorger auf ihre Angebote an Produkten, Dienstleistungen und Informationen rund um die Energiewende untersucht. Die Photovoltaik sei mit einem Anteil von etwa 20 Prozent dabei die am meisten offerierte erneuerbare Energie, so das Ergebnis der am Dienstag vorgelegten Studie. Bereits zwei von drei Energieversorgern, die Photovoltaik anbieten, hätten zudem auch Speichersysteme im Angebot. Die Energieversorger nehmen bei den Photovoltaik-Produkten teilweise die Hilfe externer Dienstleister in Anspruch, wie es bei EuPD Research weiter hieß. Neben dem klassischen Geschäftsmodells des Verkaufs von Photovoltaik-Anlagen setzten die Unternehmen auch auf neue Formen wie Contracting, Miet- und Pachtmodelle.
Die Auswertung von EuPD habe zudem gezeigt, dass insbesondere die Energieversorger in Nordrhein-Westfalen auf Photovoltaik-Anlagen setzten. 27 Prozent hätten entsprechende Produkte in ihrem Portfolio. In Bayern seien es hingegen nur 13 Prozent der Energieversorger. EuPD Research sieht den Grund in der hohen Wettbewerbsintensität des Marktes. So sei aufgrund des hohen Bestands bereit eine gewisse Sättigung im Haushaltssegment in Bayern erreicht.
Die Untersuchung von EuPD Research für die Studie „Energieversorger in der Energiewende“ sei im Frühjahr erfolgt. Alle deutschen Energieversorger seien dabei auf ihr Angebot hinsichtlich Produkten, Dienstleistungen und Informationen in den vier Energiewendesegmenten Strom, Wärme, Mobilität und Energieeffizienz bewertet worden. In der Studie seien bundesweite und regionale Auswertungen enthalten.

Fragen und Antworten zum Ballastierungswebinar mit PMT (Teil 1): Bloß nicht abheben!

Fragen und Antworten zum Ballastierungswebinar mit PMT (Teil 1): Bloß nicht abheben!


Was in dem Film vom Dach kommt, sieht aus wie ein fliegender Teppich. Im Wind flattern drei Module, die in Reihe mit einem Montagegestell verbunden sind. Bis sie auf den Boden krachen. Zu sehen ist dies in einem Video auf Youtube. Es mag sein, dass in diesem Fall ein Orkan herrschte, dem Dächer und Photovoltaik-Anlagen nicht standhalten können. Für Peter Grass, Geschäftsführer von PMT, zeigt das Beispiel aber, was geschieht, wenn zu wenig ballastiert wird.
In dem pv magazine Webinar mit PMT als Initiativpartner verglich er die Ballastierungsberechnungen von sechs Herstellern. Drei von ihnen kommen bei dem gleichen Dach und dem gleichen Dachausschnitt auf rund 1.000 Tonnen, die drei anderen auf sieben bis 160 Kilogramm. Die Unterschiede sind also enorm. Thorsten Kray, Leiter der Abteilung Aerodynamik und PV-Windlasten des I.F.I Instituts für Industrieaerodynamik, präsentierte zehn Tipps, wie Installateure die Güte einer Auslegung einschätzen können.
Im folgenden beantworten Peter Grass und Thorsten Kray schriftlich Fragen, die Teilnehmer während des Webinars gestellt haben und die teilweise nicht mehr beantwortet werden konnten. Im ersten Teil geht es um den Ballastierungsvergleich und den Verbund von Modulen. Im in Kürze erscheinenden zweiten Teil werden die Themen Wärmedämmung und Haftreibungsbeiwert besprochen sowie allgemeinere Fragen beantwortet.

Antworten auf Fragen aus dem Webinar:

Bei dem Ballastierungsvergleich hat Peter Grass den Ballast von sechs Systemen verglichen. Wie lässt sich die Ballastierung von sechs unterschiedlichen Systemen vergleichen, obwohl diese Systeme wahrscheinlich sehr unterschiedliche Ergebnisse im Windkanal erzielt haben?
Thorsten Kray: Die Ballastierung spiegelt doch indirekt die Unterschiede in den Windkanalgutachten wieder, die zur Ballastberechnung herangezogen wurden. Bei den drei gezeigten sehr niedrig ballastierten Systemen gehe ich davon aus, dass deren Bemessungsgrundlagen nicht dem Stand der Technik entsprechen. Weitergehende Informationen, die mir vorliegen, lassen in mindestens zwei Fällen den Schluss zu, dass die Spezifikationen des WTG-Merkblatts „Windkanalversuche in der Gebäudeaerodynamik“ und damit der DIN EN 1991-1-4/NA:2010-12 nicht eingehalten wurden.
Wie groß ist der Unterschied in den Eigengewichten und wie sehr führt dieser Unterschied zu unterschiedlichen Ballastierungen?
Thorsten Kray: Grundsätzlich gilt, dass zehn Kilogramm mehr Eigengewicht mit zehn Kilogramm weniger an benötigtem Ballast gleichzusetzen sind.
Sie haben in dem Vergleich die Statikvorgabe des Gebäudes nicht erwähnt. Diese ist doch das Maß der Dinge, oder?
Peter Grass: Es gibt viele Dachmerkmale, die mindestens genauso wichtig sind, wie der Standsicherheitsnachweis der Photovoltaik-Anlage selbst. Das sind beispielweise die Traglastreserven des Gesamtgebäudes, vor allem aber seiner Sekundärbauteile, die flächige, lineare oder punktuelle Lasteinleitung in die Dachfläche, die Ausrichtung der Bodenprofile zur Sickenlaufrichtung des Trapezbleches, die statische Druckfestigkeit der Dämmungen und auch der Dachbahn. Hier ging es aber rein um den Vergleich der Ballastierungsansätze verschiedener Photovoltaik-Unterkonstruktions-Systeme – die anderen Themen wären aber sicher ein interessanter Stoff für ein weiteres Webinar.
Thorsten Kray: Selbstverständlich sind die Traglastreserven des Gebäudes zu beachten und nicht zu überschreiten. Genauso ist aber bei ballastierten Photovoltaik-Montagesystemen auf Flachdächern der Stand der Technik entsprechend den gültigen Normen (WTG-Merkblatt, DIN EN 1991-1-4) einzuhalten. Nur beides zusammen verschafft Sicherheit.
Wer ist in der Haftung, wenn der Ballast nicht ausreicht und etwas passiert? Man hört immer wieder, das sei der Bauherr.
Peter Grass: Grundsätzlich trägt der Bauherr die Verantwortung für die Errichtung seines Bauwerkes – unabhängig ob es sich um ein Gebäude oder wie hier um eine Photovoltaik-Anlage handelt. Diese Verantwortung umfasst von der Genehmigung, bis zur Einhaltung der Arbeitssicherheitsvorschriften auf der Baustelle natürlich auch den Nachweis der Standsicherheit seines Bauvorhabens. Da diese Aufgabe aber meist die Fähigkeiten des Bauherrn übersteigt, überträgt er diese Aufgaben an den Architekten oder in der Solarbranche eben an den Installateur oder EPC. Dieser trägt nun die Verantwortung und muss die Standsicherheit des Bauwerkes, die Verwendung zugelassener Bauprodukte und so weiter garantieren und verantworten.
 Gibt es Situationen, in denen kein zusätzlicher Ballast für den Randbereich notwendig ist? Wenn ja, in welchen?
Thorsten Kray: Wenn Ihnen eine solche Ballastberechnung begegnet, sollten Sie sehr misstrauisch werden. Es müssen schon sehr viele günstige Faktoren (sehr hohes Eigengewicht, sehr geringe Windexposition am Standort, aerodynamisch äußerst günstiges Montagesystem, hervorragende statische Verbundwirkung) zusammenkommen, damit dies der Fall ist. In mehr als 99 Prozent aller von mir nachgerechneten Auslegungen wäre der Randbereich nicht ballastfrei gewesen.
Kann man beim I.F.I. eine Nachberechnung von Auslegungen beauftragen? Um wie viel erhöht sich dadurch der Preis einer Anlage?
Thorsten Kray:  Bitte sprechen Sie mich hierzu persönlich an. Der Preis für eine Nachrechnung hängt davon ab, welche Unterlagen mir zur Verfügung gestellt werden und wie vollständig diese sind. Er hängt ebenso davon ab, wie ausführlich die Dokumentation meiner Nachrechnung sein soll. Generell lässt sich sagen, dass die Nachrechnung der Ballastierung einer kleinen Anlage oftmals genauso viel Aufwand produziert wie die einer großen Anlage.
Müsste man Systeme, die im Jahr 2013 gebaut worden sind, nicht nachberechnen, weil die Experten heute höhere Ballastierungen einsetzen als damals? Bietet PMT die Nachrechnung von solchen Systemen an?
Peter Grass:  Gerne werden wir für alle von uns berechneten Systeme eine Nachberechnung nach den aktuellsten Erkenntnissen und Ergebnissen anbieten.
Thorsten Kray:  Dies ist ein schwieriges Thema. Generell lässt sich sagen, je älter das Windgutachten ist, desto weniger entspricht es dem Stand der Technik. Entsprechend fallen heute berechnete Ballastierungen meist deutlich höher aus als noch vor vier Jahren.

Zum Verbund von Modulen

Ein wesentlicher Parameter, der auch im Webinar genannt wurde, ist die Lasteinflussfläche. Wie groß der Verbund bei der Ballastberechnung sein darf, hängt von dessen Steifigkeit ab. Die Systeme klemmen immer in den Modulecken. Es gibt keine Montageschienen in Modullängsrichtung. Beim Abhebeverbund muss daher der Modulrahmen die Steifigkeit übernehmen. Daher muss die Steifigkeit nach VDI 6012-1.4 nachgewiesen werden. Meiner Erfahrung nach gibt es solche Nachweise nicht. Stimmt diese Erfahrung und wie sollte man als Installateur damit umgehen?
Peter Grass: Bei den Systemen von PMT gibt es eine Konstruktionsschiene in Modullängsrichtung und eine zusätzliche Aussteifung dieser Verbindung in den Eckbereichen! Auf Grund unserer Ergebnisse und Erkenntnisse aus Großfeldversuchen zur Ermittlung von Lasteinflussflächen halten wir dies auch für den einzig nachweisbaren Weg, die Lasteinflussfläche auch unabhängig des Modulrahmens sicherstellen zu können.
Thorsten Kray:  Einige Hersteller weisen ihre Lasteinflussflächen mit Hilfe statischer Belastungsversuche auf Abheben und Verschieben nach. Die große Mehrzahl aller Hersteller tut dies allerdings bislang nicht. Einheitliche Richtlinien zur Versuchssystematik fehlen bislang, werden aber im Ausland derzeit entwickelt.
Stehen sich durchgehende Grundprofile, die eine geringere Ballastierung ermöglichen, und ein Raupeneffekt konträr gegenüber? Ab welcher Modulfeld-Größe dürfen stationäre Cp-Werte angewandt werden? Gibt es so etwas wie eine Mindestballastierung?
Peter Grass: Bezüglich Ballastierung und Raupeneffekt ist das angestrebte Optimum ein statisch sehr tragfähiges Gesamtsystem mit durchgehenden Schienen und dennoch genug Bauteilflexibilität oder „Bauteilspiel“, um die Effekte der thermischen Längenausdehnung zu minimieren. Mit den Klickverbindungen innerhalb der Bodenschienenverbindungen innerhalb der Systeme von PMT ist uns diese Annäherung sehr gut gelungen und wir können relativ große Felder mit geringen Ausdehnungseffekten realisieren.
Thorsten Kray:  In einem guten Windgutachten sollten die Anwendungsgrenzen von Cp-Werten klar definiert sein. Das Konzept stationärer und instationärer Cp-Werte entspricht nicht dem Stand der Technik und stammt auch nicht vom I.F.I.. Heutzutage lässt sich eine Ballastierung für jede beliebige Lasteinflussfläche berechnen. Vorgeschriebene Mindestballastierungen existieren nicht.
Der Verbund von Modulen und Reihen hilft, den Ballast zu reduzieren. Warum bieten Sie trotzdem ein System ohne Verbund an?
Peter Grass: Der Verbund hilft Ballast zu reduzieren, Kraftübertragungen über die Module zu vermeiden, die Lasten flächiger in das Dach und die Dämmungen einzuleiten, schneller zu montieren und vieles mehr. Ein solches System erfordert aber einen höheren Materialeinsatz als die in den meisten Fällen technisch unzureichenden Minimallösungen mit nicht durchgehenden Bodenschienen. Unser System PMT Ecolution (Kurzschienen) dient oft nur als Einstieg in vertiefende technische Gespräche, die die Sinnhaftigkeit von durchgehenden Bodenschienen verdeutlichen. Wir verkaufen rund 90 Prozent PMT Evolution (durchgehende Schienen) und sehen bei den meisten Projekten auch keine technische Alternative.

Photovoltaic Austria rät zur raschen Beantragung der Solarförderung

Photovoltaic Austria rät zur raschen Beantragung der Solarförderung


Die vorletzte Fördermillion wird seit dem 15. Oktober angeknabbert, wie Photovoltaic Austria (PVA) zu Wochenbeginn mitteilte. Insgesamt sind acht Millionen Euro Solarförderung in dem Programm des Klima- und Energiefonds für das laufende Jahr vorgesehen. Damit werden kleine Photovoltaik-Anlagen bis fünf Kilowatt Leistung mit einem Zuschuss von 275 Euro pro Kilowatt gefördert. Bei gebäudeintegrierten Photovoltaik-Anlagen dieser Größenordnung liegt der Zuschuss bei 375 Euro pro Kilowatt installierter Leistung. Allerdings ist die Förderpauschale auf maximal 35 Prozent der Investitionskosten gedeckelt.
Offiziell könnten noch bis zum 30. November Anträge für die Solarförderung gestellt werden. Erfahrungsgemäß steige gegen Ende der Förderperiode die Nachfrage jedoch sprunghaft an, heißt es beim PVA weiter. Um nicht leer auszugehen, sollten die Förderanträge möglichst rasch gestellt werden, empfiehlt der Verband. Dafür sei nur ein Zählerpunkt notwendig. Nach Registrierung blieben noch drei Monate Zeit, um die Anlage zu errichten.
Hans Kronberger von PVA lobt das Programm: „Der Beitrag, den der Klimafonds in den letzten zehn Jahren für die Markteinführung der Photovoltaik in Österreich geleistet hat, kann gar nicht hoch genug eingeschätzt werden.“ Mehr als 53.000 kleine Photovoltaik-Anlagen seien bisher unterstützt worden. Die Preise für die Photovoltaik-Anlagen seien dabei seit 2008 um 70 Prozent gesunken. Dies schlage sich auch im Zuschuss wieder. „Der Förderbedarf hat sich in diesem Zeitraum von 2.800 auf 275 Euro pro Kilowattpeak reduziert! Der tatsächliche Wert der Förderung liegt aber in der gelungenen Bewusstseinsbildung für die saubere Eigenstromerzeugung in der Bevölkerung“, so Kronberger weiter.

GTM Research untersucht mögliche Auswirkungen der Section 201-Petition auf US-Markt

GTM Research untersucht mögliche Auswirkungen der Section 201-Petition auf US-Markt


Nachdem die Internationale Handelskommission der USA (US ITC) eine Schädigung der heimischen Hersteller kristalliner Photovoltaik-Produkte im September festgestellt hat, wird derzeit über die zu ergreifenden Schutzmaßnahmen gemäß der Section 201-Petition gerungen. Bis zum 13. November hat die Behörde Zeit, ihre Vorschläge an US-Präsidenten Donald Trump zu senden. Die Petitionäre Suniva und Solarworld Americas hatten in einer Anhörung verschiedene Maßnahmen zum Schutz der heimischen Solarindustrie gefordert. Einerseits geht es um die Einführung eines Zolls auf importierte Solarzellen und Solarmodule, andererseits sollen die Importe beschränkt werden.
Die Analysten von GTM Research haben verschiedene Szenarien durchgespielt. So haben sie versucht, die weitere Entwicklung des US-Photovoltaik-Marktes abzuschätzen, wenn Zölle zwischen 10 und 40 US-Dollarcent pro Watt für eingeführte Solarzellen erhoben werden. Nach dem Basisszenario wird für die USA ein Photovoltaik-Zubau von kumuliert 40 Gigawatt für die Zeit von 2018 bis 2022 erwartet. Mit einem Zoll von 10 US-Dollarcent pro Watt sei nur mit einem leichten Rückgang der Nachfrage um etwa zehn Prozent zu rechnen. Käme es zu den von Suniva in etwa geforderten 40 US-Dollarcent pro Watt an Zoll ist nach Ansicht von GTM Research mit einer Halbierung des erwarteten Wachstums des Photovoltaik-Marktes bis 2022 zu rechnen. Besonders betroffen davon wäre das Segment großer Photovoltaik-Freiflächenanlagen, wo der Rückgang bei bis zu 57,3 Prozent bis 2022 liegen würde.
Nach Ansicht von GTM Research werde die heimische Photovoltaik-Produktion sowie die zollfrei lieferbare Menge an Solarmodulen und -zellen nicht ausreichen, um die Nachfrage zu decken. Die US ITC hatte einige Länder ausgenommen, weil durch sie keine Schädigung der US-Solarindustrie festgestellt worden sei, darunter Singapur, Korea, Kanada und Australien. Bei Solarzellen könnten somit im kommenden Jahr knapp fünf Gigawatt zollfrei in die USA importiert werden, bei Solarmodulen seien es bis zu 6,7 Gigawatt – wobei hier auch Dünnschichtprodukte eingerechnet sind, die nicht unter die Section 201-Petition fallen. Zusätzlich hätten sich die Projektierer bereits rund zwei Gigawatt an Solarmodulen für Projekte im kommenden Jahr gesichert und schon importiert. Die somit verfügbaren sieben Gigawatt für 2018 beinhalteten jedoch, dass sowohl REC als auch First Solar ihre komplette Produktion in die USA lieferten, so die Analysten weiter. Für das laufende Jahr zeigt die Analyse, dass kristalline Solarmodule mit mehr als zwölf Gigawatt in die USA eingeführt worden.

Die Section 201-Petition hat GTM Research zufolge die Modulpreise in den USA bereits steigen lassen. Nach einem Tiefststand im ersten Quartal 2017 seien die durchschnittlichen Verkaufspreise der chinesischen Tier-1-Hersteller seither kontinuierlich angestiegen und erreichten im vierten Quartal wieder ein Niveau um die 50 US-Dollarcent pro Watt im Kleinanlagensegment. Und trotz Kostenreduktionen bei anderen Komponenten seien die Systempreise für die Installation einer Photovoltaik-Anlagen das erste Mal seit Jahren angestiegen.
Die USITC wird am 31. Oktober über die Maßnahmen abstimmen. Bis zum 13. November müssen sie dann US-Präsidenten Donald Trump vorgelegt werden. Er hat bis Mitte Januar Zeit, über die endgültigen Sanktionen zu entscheiden. Ende Januar 2018 könnten sie dann spätestens in Kraft treten.

Chinas Photovoltaik-Zubau steuert auf 50 Gigawatt zu

Chinas Photovoltaik-Zubau steuert auf 50 Gigawatt zu


Nach den bereits beeindruckenden gut 34,5 Gigawatt Photovoltaik-Zubau im vergangenen Jahr wird China in diesem Jahr wohl die 50 Gigawatt-Marke knacken. Nach dem jüngsten Bericht von Asia Europe Clean Energy (Solar) Advisory Co. Ltd. (AECEA) sind bis Ende September neue Photovoltaik-Anlagen mit rund 42 Gigawatt installiert worden. Damit müssten im Oktober, November und Dezember monatlich etwa 2,7 Gigawatt zugebaut werden, um die 50 Gigawatt für 2017 zu erreichen. Im August und September sind AECEA zufolge Photovoltaik-Anlagen mit etwa 6,5 Gigawatt Gesamtleistung installiert worden. Im Juni und Juli seien es sogar 25 Gigawatt neu installierte Photovoltaik-Leistung gewesen.
AECEA erwartet, dass wegen einiger Feiertage der Zubau in China im Oktober etwas rückläufig sei. Erfahrungsgemäß ziehe die Nachfrage im November und Dezember wieder an. Die 50 Gigawatt seien in unmittelbarer Reichweite, heißt es weiter. Bis Ende September habe sich die kumulierte Photovoltaik-Leistung in China auf rund 120 Gigawatt erhöht.
Dabei sei in diesem Jahr vor allem der Markt für die kleineren (distributed) Photovoltaik-Anlagen kräftig gewachsen. In den ersten drei Quartalen summierte sich der Zubau in diesem Segment auf rund 15 Gigawatt, wie es bei AECEA heißt. Gegenüber dem Vorjahreszeitraum sei dies ein Anstieg um 255 Prozent und mache rund 35 Prozent des Gesamtzubaus aus. Dieses Wachstum sei vor allem durch zusätzliche Anreize für diese Anlagen durch die Nationale Energiebehörde NEA zurückzuführen. Zudem hätten auch zahlreiche Provinzen und Städte zusätzliche finanzielle Anreize für diese Anlagen offeriert. Im Gesamtjahr könnte der Zubau in diesem Segment nach AECEA optimistischem Szenario 18 bis 19 Gigawatt erreichen, konservativ geschätzt mindestens aber 16 bis 17 Gigawatt. NEA hat das Ziel gesetzt, bis 2020 eine installierte Leistung von 60 Gigawatt bei den distributed Photovoltaik-Anlagen – wozu gewerbliche und industrielle Dachanlagen, Agro-Photovoltaik und schwimmende Photovoltaik-Anlagen hauptsächlich gezählt werden – zu erreichen. Bis Ende des Jahres werden es nach AECEA-Angaben zwischen 25 und 28 Gigawatt sein.
Auch für die Jahre 2018 bis 2020 erwarten die Analysten einen weiteren Photovoltaik-Zubau von jeweils 35 bis 40 Gigawatt in China. Damit könnte die kumulierte Photovoltaik-Leistung in dem Land bis zum Ende des Jahrzehnts bis zu knapp 250 Gigawatt erreichen. Allerdings sieht AECEA auch einige Herausforderungen für die nächsten Jahre, etwa der immer weiter steigende Betrag an Einspeisezahlungen, die sich nach 2017 auf 15 bis 18 Milliarden US-Dollar jährlich belaufen könnten. Das erklärte Ziel von NEA ist es, die Einspeisevergütung bis 2020 um 50 Prozent gegenüber dem Niveau von 2015 zu senken. Zudem könnte das bestehende Modell mit Einspeisetarifen durch ein Zertifikatehandel abgelöst werden.
Doch nicht nur der Zubau legt weiter kräftig zu. Auch die Photovoltaik-Hersteller bauen ihre Kapazitäten exponentiell aus. AECEA berichtet unter Berufung von den Photovoltaik-Industrieverband CPIA, dass während der ersten drei Quartale die inländische Polysilizium-Produktion um 17 Prozent auf 170.000 Tonnen, die Waferkapazitäten um 44 Prozent auf 62 Gigawatt, die von Zellen um 50 Prozent auf 51 Gigawatt und für Module um 43 Prozent auf 53 Gigawatt gesteigert worden seien. Nach Schätzungen seien rund 80 Prozent der in China produzierten Solarmodule auch im Inland geblieben. Größte Exportziele chinesischer Hersteller bei Modulen seien Indien und Südkorea gewesen.
Speicher kommen ab 2018
Nach Einschätzung von AECEA sind Energiespeicher das nächste große Thema für China. Derzeit existierten etwas 200 Hersteller in diesem Segment, die 2018 über eine Produktionskapazität von insgesamt 120 Gigawattstunden verfügen sollen. Bis 2020 sollen diese auf rund 270 Gigawattstunden anwachsen. 2016 hätten die Hersteller Lithium-Ionen-Batterien mit etwa 30,5 Gigawattstunden exportiert. Ein Anstieg von 80 Prozent im Jahresvergleich, dem dieses Jahr ein erneuter Anstieg um weitere 40 Prozent folgen soll.