Gesamtzahl der Seitenaufrufe

Follower

Donnerstag, 19. Oktober 2017

UK's First Floating Offshore Wind Turbine Up and Running

UK's First Floating Offshore Wind Turbine Up and Running

file
Editor's Take: The project also incorporates Batwind, a 1-MWh lithium battery storage facility that Statoil will use to test the viability of energy storage coupled with offshore wind.
Floating wind is important to watch, and Renewable Energy World will keep an eye on developments in this exciting offshore wind space.

Are you part of the the growing offshore wind industry? If so, we'd love to have you speak at our Offshore Wind Executive Summit, taking place in September 2018 in Houston, Texas. You can propose your topic idea at this link.

Listen Up: Running a Successful Local Solar Business

Listen Up: Running a Successful Local Solar Business

solar
Large companies are predominant in most industries. But when it comes to rooftop solar installations, small is beautiful. Although there have been several large national-scale solar installers, in the aggregate the smaller, local companies dominate. As with most other construction businesses, local companies generally understand their local markets better and have lower overhead — enabling them to provide better customer service at lower prices.
On this week’s Energy Show we have the pleasure of speaking with Vince Battaglia, the CEO of Renova Solar. Renova started as Vince’s MBA thesis; eleven years later Renova is now the leading solar installation company in the Coachella Valley. Like many other local solar installation companies, Renova has expanded its residential solar installation business to include commercial installations, system maintenance and battery storage.
Granted, the Palm Desert area is blessed by an abundance of sunlight and high electric rates — a combination that is perfect for a thriving solar business. But dealing with the ups and downs of the Solar Coaster is challenging. For more about the challenges inherent in building and running a successful local solar business, Listen Up to this week’s Energy Show on Renewable Energy World.

As energy costs consume more and more of our hard-earned dollars, we as consumers really start to pay attention. But we don't have to resign ourselves to $5/gallon gas prices, $200/month electric bills and $500 heating bills. There are literally hundreds of products, tricks and techniques that we can use to dramatically reduce these costs — very affordably.
The Energy Show on Renewable Energy World is a weekly 20-minute podcast that provides tips and advice to reduce your home and business energy consumption. Every week we'll cover topics that will help cut your energy bill, explain new products and technologies in plain English, and cut through the hype so that you can make smart and cost-effective energy choices.
About Your Host
Barry Cinnamon is a long-time advocate of renewable energy and is a widely recognized solar power expert. In 2001 he founded Akeena Solar — which grew to become the largest national residential solar installer by the middle of the last decade with over 10,000 rooftop customers coast to coast. He partnered with Westinghouse to create Westinghouse Solar in 2010, and sold the company in 2012.
His pioneering work on reducing costs of rooftop solar power systems include Andalay, the first solar panel with integrated racking, grounding and wiring; the first UL listed AC solar panel; and the first fully “plug and play” AC solar panel. His current efforts are focused on reducing the soft costs for solar power systems, which cause system prices in the U.S. to be double those of Germany.
Although Barry may be known for his outspoken work in the solar industry, he has hands-on experience with a wide range of energy saving technologies.  He's been doing residential energy audits since the punch card days, developed one of the first ground-source heat pumps in the early ‘80s, and always abides by the Laws of Thermodynamics.
This podcast was originally produced by Spice Solar and was presented here with permission.
Lead image credit: Patrick Breitenbach | Flickr

The Effect of Natural Disasters on Electricity Prices

The Effect of Natural Disasters on Electricity Prices

file
Solar leasing promoters have long claimed that electricity costs will keep rising, but we haven’t see this happening – yet.  Actually, almost all of the standard generation sources are benefiting from lower costs – natural gas is low, coal is low, and nuclear is… well it’s not dramatically more expensive than it has been. There is no doubt in my mind, however, that prices are going to go up.
So why do I say that the prices are going to go up?  Three reasons – and they have nothing to do with generation: deferred maintenance, retrofits, and liability expenditures. These are structural and market issues that have nothing to do with the price of fuel sources. The recent dramatic weather events (which are only going to get worse) highlight just how these factors are coming to the forefront.
Let’s take a look at these three items in light of recent events: fires, hurricanes, and re-expansions in the grid.
California Fires.  Remember a few years back there were devastating fires in San Bruno from a ruptured gas line, that in retrospect had needed upgrading and maintenance? Just this month, there have been equally devastating fires across quiet neighborhoods that would have never worried about fire damage.  In both these cases, it looks like the grid and power infrastructure needed substantial maintenance and retrofits to upgrade and accident-proof the network. The costs for these are in terms of 10’s of billions, and these costs are passed on to the consumer.

Hurricanes. Consider the hurricanes that have devastated regions and left them without power. There has been massive mobilization of resources to restore power, and in places like Puerto Rico, to start from scratch. Rebuilding will be extraordinarily costly and those costs will have to be paid for sooner or later.
Sadly, however, events like these are becoming less “extra” ordinary, and more just ordinary.  To build a sustainable grid means building power substations that can withstand flooding, erecting power lines that won’t be blown over, etc.  These all come with a substantial price tag.  There is a scientific study looking at flooding in the mid-Atlantic states and just how many of the power stations would be incapacitated by just moderate flooding.  It’s not a pretty picture.
The retrofit costs to aging power generating facilities are expected to go into the 100’s of billions, and that is with using the same fuel sources.  Once you talk about retrofitting the transmission grid, then costs go up, literally, by the mile.
If it becomes clear that wires in trees and older transformers were the ultimate cause of the Calif. fires, this will highlight that deferred maintenance and the need for retrofitting are crucial requirements.
Then of course there is the legal liabilities that may result from either the power disasters, or from the lawsuits that can come along, which are also likely to increase. Liability expenses could change utilities in ways that are unknown – perhaps leading to smaller, regional power companies (that might well rely on microgrids).
Why We Should Be Investing in Microgrids
How do microgrids play into all of this? First, they can offer substantial savings compared to grid regeneration or refurbishing, and they become viable cost alternatives to the increased prices of grid electricity.
Today in Brooklyn, ConEd has agreed to install a local microgrid to avoid a substation expansion – saving close to $1B, according to the utility.  This example shows that the microgrid is a win-win solution that benefits the community through local control and price management, and the utility-through saved costs.
Microgrids are not yet cheap enough to have one in every neighborhood, but the harbingers are already showing that they can provide cost-effective alternatives in a world with increasing weather disruption and utility bill price increases.
Nothing like living on borrowed time or borrowed money.  At some point you gotta pay.
Lead image: California homes on fire. Credit: Depositphotos.com.

sonnen To Build Innovative Residential Energy Storage Community in the US

sonnen To Build Innovative Residential Energy Storage Community in the US

file
Soon 3,000 homes in Prescott, Arizona will produce, store, and share their own power in sonnen’s newest US project with Mandalay Homes.
Each home in the new community will have solar PV and a sonnenBatterie installed, enabling every household to produce and consume most of its own electricity, according to sonnen.
The energy storage systems will be interconnected and able to communicate with each other using the same technology that is already used for power sharing in the German “sonnenCommunity.”
Together the homes will serve as a virtual power plant with a capacity of 23 MWh and output of 11.6 MW. The batteries can store energy during peak production times and then feed it back into the grid later when consumption is very high. In addition, the sonnen-City will also be able to contribute to the public power grid.
“This is the city of the future, a place where all residents produce, store and share their own energy,” said Philipp Schröder, Managing Director of Sales and Marketing at sonnen.
The sonnenBatteries is also able to interact with a smart home controller to store solar power as well as distribute it to each home’s air conditioning systems, lighting, and other power consumers such as pool pumps, according to the company.

Read more: Letter from the Editor: If We Could Talk to the Batteries
Lead image: sonnenbatterie in a German home. Credit: sonnen.

A Helpful Roadmap for California's Certified “Smart Inverters”

A Helpful Roadmap for California's Certified “Smart Inverters”

file
Solar inverters are becoming more intelligent this year. California’s Rule 21, which is now partially in effect, governs the safety of PV arrays and their interconnection communications with the local investor-owned utility.
The rule has three basic phases, of which the first came into effect Sept. 8 under a draft resolution of the California Public Utilities Commission (CPUC). The effective date for the other two phases has not yet been set, however a CPUC vote on the draft resolution is set for October 12, and a California Smart Inverter Working Group (SWIG) workshop on Phases 2 and 3 is scheduled for Nov. 17.
The rule dates back to regulatory meetings with SWIG in early 2013 that identified the development of advanced inverter functionality as an important strategy to mitigate the impact of high penetrations of distributed energy resources, particularly residential solar.
The first phase of the rule covers seven autonomous functions developed by SWIG. Phase 1 describes an initial set of Advanced Grid Functionality (AGF) requirements, including voltage and frequency ride-through, extending the times that solar energy systems can continue to operate while grid conditions are in flux, as well as methods of reactive power control to help regulate grid voltage, according to Harsha Venkatesh, Enphase’s director of product line management.
Phase 2 involves communication standards. This phase will set a common language for how inverters, solar energy systems, and utility systems talk to one another. Systems must also be able to communicate over the internet, although they can’t yet be required to have an internet connection because California has yet to decide who — the utility or the homeowner — should pay for internet connection, says Venkatesh.

Phase 2 is expected to take place no sooner than March 1, 2018, but could be delayed until nine months after the release of the SunSpec Alliance communication protocol certification test standard, or the release of another industry recognized communication protocol certification test standard, the CPUC explains.
Phase 3 will cover additional “advanced” inverter functions, like data monitoring, remote connection and disconnection, and maximum power controls, Venkatesh says. The specific requirements of this phase have not yet been determined, according to the CPUC.
See: Solar, Batteries, Smart Inverters and EVs To Make Up “Customer Grid” of the Future
To codify the rule, Underwriter Laboratories (UL) has developed a testing protocol for certification under the new rules, known as UL 1741 Supplement A (SA), according to the California Solar Energy Industries Association (CALSEIA).
The California Energy Commission (CEC) maintains an official list of inverters that comply with the new rule, that is used by state utilities to approve interconnection portals on the grid. CEC updates the list once a month, usually in the first week of the month, CALSEIA notes. As of October 17, 2017, there were more than 3,000 approved inverters on the list.
Among companies and organizations that have commented on the evolving rulemaking and affected customer tariffs are the following: CALSEIA; Enphase; the state investor-owned utilities, jointly; OutBack; the Solar Energy Industries Association (SEIA); SolarEdge; SunPower; Sunrun; and Tabuchi Electric.
Lead image: Push-pin path. Credit: DepostiPhotos.

Three Technology Trends and Their Effects on Data and Software

Three Technology Trends and Their Effects on Data and Software

technology
Companies using OSIsoft’s PI System gathered this week in London at the OSIsoft EMEA Users Conference to talk about the realities of what Martin Otterson calls the velocity, variety and volume of data in the modern business world.
Otterson, who is OSIsoft’s senior vice president of customer success, said during the welcome session on Tuesday, for example, that Detroit-based DTE Energy manages 27 million data tags, or datapoints that hold a single value over time. And renewables company E.ON manages data that comes in 250 formats.
OSIsoft’s PI System allows organizations to collect, analyze and visualize large amounts of data from multiple sources.
The new data challenge, Otterson said, is to build on the current business architecture to develop new business practices for changing markets and understand how businesses can respond to those changes quickly, and survive.
During the welcome session, Ronan de Hooge, OSIsoft’s chief software architect, identified three technology trends that are driving business data and how software is responding to better use that data for growth.
More Data from Sensing Technologies
Since 2008, IoT connected devices and sensors have increased by 4 billion, and by 2020 they are expected to reach 20 billion, according to de Hooge.

“That means there is a lot more data out there,” he said, adding that there are many different ownership rules for that data and it arrives at different frequencies.
In the business world, data will be coming from traditional control systems, directly from sensors into the cloud, and from external clouds.
De Hooge said that software will begin to help organizations bring all that data into one system, then contextualize it and give it a structure that can drive organizational decision making.
More Storage and Computing Capacity
According to de Hooge, base computing platforms are seeing an increase in capabilities in terms of storage and raw computing capacity.
He said that by 2030, mobile devices are expected to have 60 petabytes of data storage, where one petabyte represents about 200,000 DVDs.

He also said that the powerful computing systems we’re seeing today can bring machine learning and artificial intelligence into the forefront of organizational strategies.

“What they're expecting is that you'll start to see systems that can, for example, perform operations that produce highly accurate weather forecasting,” he said.
Software will begin to respond to the increase in storage and computing capacity by reshaping that data, de Hooge said.
In addition, software designers will work to structure data so that organizations can use it to create meaningful insights, and expose data to artificial intelligence and machine learning.

The ultimate goal, he said, is to make sure that data is timely and shaped, and it's ready for the decision-making process.

More Action from Insights
According to de Hooge, the value of the insights gained from data will come from what organizations do with those insights.
He said that the human-based interaction models, such as virtual reality systems and digital assistants — think Alexa and Google Home — that are beginning to enter the commercial market will spill over to the industrial sector in the next few years. Organizations will begin to take advantage of these systems in the work environment to drive strategy.
In addition, more organizations will place their trust in machine-based automation for decision making, he said. The technologies behind, for example, blind spot detection and crash avoidance in cars, will make their way to organizational processes as decision makers learn to trust artificial intelligence and machine learning.
“When you start to institutionalize information and patterns at the automation level,” de Hooge said, we’ll see decision makers step away from the controls and let the systems make the decision for them.
Software will begin to respond to the need for systems that can support those interaction models for the organizations that seek to implement them.

México: la iniciativa privada apuesta por la solar



Israel Hurtado, secretario general de Asociación Mexicana de Energía Solar Fotovoltaica (Asolmex), ha revelado en una entrevista a la prensa local que hay más realidad para la solar que las licitaciones estatales. “Más allá de las subastas eléctricas realizadas por la Comisión Federal de Electricidad (CFE) para impulsar el desarrollo de plantas de energía solar, se están construyendo 10 proyectos en México destinados directamente para la iniciativa privada”.
Reveló también que algunas de estas obras iniciarán operaciones antes de que termine 2017, pues las empresas tendrán que cumplir con la nueva norma de consumo eléctrico mínimo de fuentes limpias. “No tenemos mucho conocimiento sobre cómo son estos proyectos porque son planes privados. Lo que es una realidad es que el próximo año muchas empresas deberán cumplir con las reglas de consumir energía limpia y certificada por el gobierno”, agregó el ejecutivo de la Asolmex.
El gobierno federal fijará en el 2018 un porcentaje mínimo de generación de energía a partir de fuentes limpias que cambiará cada año. Hurtado participó en la jornada global “Próximos retos de la solar fotovoltaica: capacidad disruptiva del autoconsumo”, realizada en Santiago de Chile, donde expertos internacionales en el sector energético coincidieron en que el mundo vive un boom de energía solar, y América Latina está siendo una gran protagonista.

Solarcontact-Index: Photovoltaik-Nachfrage im Herbst mau

Solarcontact-Index: Photovoltaik-Nachfrage im Herbst mau


In der Vergangenheit zog die Photovoltaik-Nachfrage im Herbst in Deutschland typischerweise an. In diesem Jahr könnte diese saisonale Erholung ausbleiben, wie Robert Doelling von das DAA Deutsche Auftragsagentur mit Blick auf die Entwicklung der Anfragen in seinem Portal feststellt. „Während in den zurückliegenden Jahren insbesondere im August und September die Online-Nachfrage nach Solaranlagen spürbar anstieg, könnte der Aufschwung dieses Jahr ausfallen. Mit Index-Werten um 60 erreicht die Angebotsnachfrage sogar ein neues Jahrestief“, sagt Doelling. Die Gründe, warum das Interesse nach fixen Angeboten so rückläufig ist, könne er aber nicht ausmachen. Seine Prognose ist jedoch, dass die Photovoltaik-Nachfrage im zweite Halbjahr 2017 deutlich schwächer ausfallen könnte als in den Vorjahren. Die Anfragen bezüglich Photovoltaik-Speichern lagen im August und September leicht höher als für Photovoltaik-Anlagen. Von den Werten zu Jahresbeginn sind diese allerdings auch weit entfernt, wie Doellings Auswertung zeigt.

Nach den Veröffentlichungen der Bundesnetzagentur sind bis Ende August neue Photovoltaik-Anlagen mit insgesamt 1200 Megawatt gemeldet worden. Während im Mai und Juli der Photovoltaik-Zubau die Marke von 200 Megawatt jeweils leicht überschritt, blieb er in den Folgemonaten wieder deutlich darunter. Im vergangenen Jahr hatte vor allem ein starker Dezember mit einem Zubau von 450 Megawatt dafür gesorgt, dass die neu installierte Leistung im Gesamtjahr noch die 1500 Megawatt übertraf. Dieser starke Zubau war auch Vorzieheffekten wegen des Inkrafttretens des EEG 2017 geschuldet.

Fragen und Antworten zum Ballastierungswebinar mit PMT (Teil 2): Bloß nicht abheben!

Fragen und Antworten zum Ballastierungswebinar mit PMT (Teil 2): Bloß nicht abheben!


Im folgenden beantworten Peter Grass und Thorsten Kray schriftlich Fragen, die Teilnehmer während des Webinars „Ballastierung und bauaufsichtliche Zulassung bei der PV-Flachdachmontage“ gestellt haben und die teilweise nicht mehr beantwortet werden konnten. Im ersten Teil ging es um den Ballastierungsvergleich, und den Verbund von Modulen. Im Webinar mit PMT als Initiativpartner verglich Peter Grass die Ballastierungsberechnungen von sechs Herstellern. Drei von ihnen kommen bei dem selben Dach und dem selben Dachausschnitt auf rund 1.000 Kilogramm, die drei anderen auf sieben bis 160 Kilogramm.
Im zweiten Teil werden die Themen Wärmedämmung und Haftreibungsbeiwert besprochen sowie allgemeinere Fragen beantwortet. Im ersten Teil ging es um den Ballastierungsvergleich und den Verbund der Solarmodule.

Antworten auf Fragen aus dem Webinar:

Zur Wärmedämmung

Auf der einen Seite ist eine ausreichende Ballastierung nötig. Hohe Gewichte schädigen aber die Wärmedämmung. Nach meiner Erfahrung wird aus diesem Grund kein Architekt mehr als 30 kg/m² akzeptieren. Liegen Sie nicht oft darüber?
Peter Grass: Die Einhaltung der statischen Druckfestigkeit der Dämmungen ist eines der wichtigsten Themen neben der Standsicherheit der Anlage. Meist sind die hohen Ballastwerte der Systeme nur in den Eckbereichen der Systeme mit freier umliegender Betrachtungsfläche nötig und zum anderen zeigt sich, dass sehr oft die Schneelast der maßgeblichere Faktor bei der Überschreitung der Druckfestigkeit der Dämmung ist. Wir führen zu allen Projekten, zu denen uns kundenseitig Informationen zu Dämmung zur Verfügung gestellt werden, einen Dämmungsnachweis. Hiermit können wir die kritischen Bereiche am Dach genau analysieren und gegebenenfalls nachjustieren. Dies geschieht durch die Erhöhung der Aufstandsflächen in Form von mehr Schutzmatten am System oder durch den Einsatz von zusätzlichen Stützbauteilen oder ganzen Bodenschienen in Teilbereichen des Systems. Gerade aber bei der Kombination aus Mineralwolldämmung und hohen Schneelasten stößt man immer wieder an technische Grenzen und Anlagen sind schlicht nicht umsetzbar – dies muss man dann auch klar kommunizieren und das Projekt verwerfen!   
Was kostet die Überprüfung, welche Last die Wärmedämmung tragen kann? Wann raten Sie zu solchen Untersuchungen?
Peter Grass: Dazu rate ich schlicht immer! Wenn uns die genaue Bezeichnung der Dämmung vorliegt, ist der Nachweis der Einhaltung der statischen Druckfestigkeiten der Dämmungen ein kostenloser und automatischer Bestandteil unserer Projektplanung. 

Zum Haftreibungsbeiwert

Ein wesentlicher Faktor bei der Berechnung der Ballastierung ist der Haftreibungsbeiwert. Wie sollte dieser festgestellt werden? Gibt es dazu eine Übersichtsliste mit realistischen Werten und was sollte der Installateur tun?
Peter Grass: Haftreibungsbeiwerte sollten im nassen und trockenen Zustand an mindestens drei Stellen am Dach per Zugversuch mit herstellerspezifischen Messschlitten überprüft werden. Die Unterschiede zwar typengleicher aber chargenunterschiedlicher Dachbahnen sind groß und auch der Verschmutzungsgrad, die Alterung und so weiter sind in Abhängigkeit vom Standort und selbst von Dachabschnitt zu Dachabschnitt unterschiedlich und spielen eine große Rolle. Selbstverständlich bieten wir von PMT einen entsprechenden Messkoffer an, um die Ermittlung des Haftreibungsbeiwertes einfach zu ermöglichen.
Thorsten Kray:  Haftreibungsbeiwerte können nur durch Versuche ermittelt werden und hängen sehr stark von der jeweiligen Reibkombination zwischen Unterkonstruktion, Bautenschutzmatte und Dachbahn ab. Wir empfehlen, mindestens unter Laborbedingungen im trockenen und nassen Zustand Haftreibungsbeiwerte für die gängigsten Reibkombinationen zu ermitteln. Die Unterschiede sind zu groß, als dass sich allgemein empfohlene Haftreibungswerte angeben ließen. Sprechen Sie als Installateur den Montagesystemhersteller doch einfach an und fragen, auf welcher Grundlage der jeweils zur Ballastberechnung verwendete Haftreibungsbeiwert beruht.
Es gibt eine Reihe von Produktzulassungen für ballastierte Flachdachsysteme, jedoch ist die Bauart von den ballastierten Systemen ungeregelt. Das betrifft die Reibung auf der Dachbahn und die Lastableitung in die Dachbahn. Haftreibungsbeiwerte können nur durch Versuche ermittelt werden. Somit sind ballastierte Anlagen streng genommen trotz Produktzulassung nicht zulässig und es müsste eine allgemeine Bauartgenehmigung durch das Deutsche Institut für Bautechnik (DIBt) erforderlich sein. Oder?
Thorsten Kray:  Das DIBt hat 2012 „Hinweise für die Herstellung, Planung und Ausführung von Solaranlagen“ veröffentlicht. Diesem haben der BSW und andere Solar-Verbände aber in weiten Teilen widersprochen.
Ist eine Lasteinleitung in die Dachhaut nach DIN 18531 überhaupt zulässig?
Thorsten Kray:  Es gibt beim DIBt eine Projektgruppe, der ich auch angehöre, und die sich mit der „Befestigung von Anlagen und Elementen auf Dachabdichtungen“ befasst. Daran erkennt man schon, dass die Lasteinleitung in die Dachhaut vom DIBt grundsätzlich als zulässig betrachtet wird.

Allgemeine Fragen

Die Wirtschaftlichkeit einer Photovoltaik-Anlage wird in der Regel über 20 Jahre berechnet und die meisten Dachflächen werden öfter als alle 50 Jahre saniert. Halten Sie es trotzdem für sinnvoll, Photovoltaik-Anlagen so auszulegen, dass sie Extremereignissen standhalten, die statistisch nur alle 50 Jahre auftreten? Wieso?
Thorsten Kray:  Es kommt darauf an, ob eine Photovoltaik-Anlage nach einer Dachsanierung wieder aufgebaut wird oder nicht. Es ist die akkumulierte Standzeit für die Auslegung heranzuziehen. Diese beträgt in der Regel weniger als 50 Jahre. Jüngste Sturmereignisse wie der Hurrikan „Irma“, der katastrophale Zerstörungen in der Karibik zur Folge hatte, lassen mich aber vermuten, dass die tatsächlichen Sturmstärken und auch die Auftretenshäufigkeiten von Extremwindereignissen in Deutschland mittlerweile höher sind als es die normativen Vorgaben suggerieren. Insofern ist auch eine Gewissensentscheidung zu treffen, ob man das volle 50-Jahres-Wiederkehrintervall oder weniger ansetzt.
Wie sollte eine brauchbare Dokumentation für gebaute Systeme aussehen?
Peter Grass: Eine wirklich brauchbare Dokumentation für Gesamtanlagen ist nur durch einen lückenlosen Gesamtnachweis von den Planungsdaten bis hin zur Anlagenerrichtung möglich. Wir bieten ein solches projektbegleitendes Verfahren mit unserem PMT-Proof-Nachweis an. Hierbei begleiten, dokumentieren, verifizieren wir extern und nehmen auch die errichtete Anlage gutachterlich ab. Dieses 8-Augen-Prinzip schafft größtmögliche Sicherheit und beugt Fehlern im Ansatz und deren Folgen bestmöglich vor.
Thorsten Kray:  Ich vermisse fast immer die Dokumentation der angesetzten Windlasten, insbesondere, wenn sie aus einem Windkanalversuch stammen. Der Böenstaudruck wird meistens noch angegeben, weitere Parameter wie die Druckbeiwerte fehlen fast immer. Dies ist auch bei der Nachvollziehbarkeit von Ballastberechnungen das Hauptproblem.
Es gab doch vor ein einigen Jahren eine Arbeitsgruppe zur DIN1055 und ballastarmen Systemen beim BSW. Gibt es daraus signifikante Ergebnisse, die die Qualität der Auslegung verbessern könnten?
Thorsten Kray:  Ich war in dieser Arbeitsgruppe damals nicht aktiv. In der Praxis sind mir Erkenntnisse aus einer solchen Arbeitsgruppe bislang nicht begegnet.
Wenn eine physikalische Trennung innerhalb eines großen Modulfelds vorliegt, das Sprungmaß aber über die Trennung beibehalten wird, ist dieser Sachverhalt dann im errechneten Ballast zu berücksichtigen? Falls ja, wäre jedes Modulfeld einzeln zu betrachten, unabhängig davon, ob im Sprungmaß weiter gebaut wird oder ob größere Distanzen zwischen den Teilfeldern realisiert werden?
Thorsten Kray:  Werden Trennungen innerhalb von Modulfeldern vorgenommen, so wirken sich diese grundsätzlich sowohl statisch als auch als aerodynamisch aus. Wird das Sprungmaß bei einer Trennung beibehalten, ändert sich die Umströmung der Module zunächst einmal nicht. Aufgrund der Schwächung der statischen Verbundwirkung an der Trennstelle sind jedoch geringere Lasteinflussflächen als bei einem statisch ununterbrochenen Feld anzusetzen. Dies wirkt sich ballasterhöhend aus. Wird das Sprungmaß erhöht, ändert sich auch die Aerodynamik ungünstig.
Thorsten Kray hat in seiner Präsentation gezeigt, warum er denkt, dass ein Hersteller mutwillig zu wenig Ballast ausgerechnet hat. Haben Sie den Hersteller mit Ihren Berechnungen einmal konfrontiert und wie war seine Reaktion?
Thorsten Kray:  Die Konfrontation erfolgte bislang indirekt über unsere Kunden, die ich über die falschen Ballastangaben des fraglichen Herstellers aufgeklärt habe. Ich gehe aber davon aus, dass der fragliche Hersteller das Webinar beziehungsweise den gedruckten Beitrag ebenfalls zur Kenntnis genommen hat. Eine direkte Reaktion mir gegenüber steht bislang noch aus.
Inwieweit decken sich die Annahmen der europäischen und US-amerikanischen (ASCE) Normen?
Thorsten Kray: Gar nicht. In ASCE 7-16 und SEAOC PV-2 2017 sind strenge Anforderungen an Windkanalversuche für ballastierte Photovoltaik-Montagesysteme zur Aufstellung auf Flachdächern definiert. Solche Anforderungen fehlen in den europäischen Normen entweder gänzlich oder unterscheiden sich völlig von den US-amerikanischen. Dies führt dazu, dass Windkanaluntersuchungen zur Anwendung in den USA wiederholt werden müssen, sofern sie bereits durchgeführt sind.
Wie bewerten Sie die Zustandserfassung der Tragwerke vor Ort bei bestehenden Gebäuden im Vorfeld der Planung? Welche Maßnahmen schlagen Sie zur richtigen Erfassung der ausgeführten Photovoltaik-Tragwerkskonstruktionen für die Dokumentation vor?
Peter Grass: Die bestmögliche Erfassung des Ist-Zustandes des Tragwerkes sollte zentrales und ureigenes Interesse des Installateurs oder des EPCs sein. Er steht im Auftrag seines Kunden für die Errichtung der Anlage in der Verantwortung und auch für mögliche Risiken und Schäden am Tragwerk. Er beginnt mit der Erfassung aller relevanten Punkte wie dem Alter der Dachbahn, der Dämmung, der Entwässerung, des Blitzschutzes, der Traglastreserven usw. Hieraus muss der Errichter die richtigen technischen Schlüsse ziehen, den Eigentümer beraten und bei einer vertretbaren Realisierbarkeit des Projektes die richtigen Komponenten einsetzen.
Thorsten Kray: Zur Zustandserfassung der Gebäudetragwerke vor Ort fehlt mir die Erfahrung. Photovoltaik-Tragwerkskonstruktionen sollten hinsichtlich der Statik der einzelnen Systembauteile dokumentiert sein, denn nicht nur der Ballast ist entscheidend. Es nützt nichts, wenn der Ballast korrekt berechnet wurde, aber beispielsweise die Modulklemmen in einem Sturmereignis versagen.
Bei einem Flachdachprojekt wurde vom Hersteller Kalksandsteinballastierung empfohlen. Der verantwortliche Architekt hat diese abgelehnt. Wie sehen Sie das und ist Kalksandstein witterungsbeständig genug?
Peter Grass: Ich verstehe die Bedenken des Architekten und sehe auch keinen Grund von den üblichen „Verdächtigen“ aus Beton abzuweichen.
Thorsten Kray: Ich bin kein Experte für Kalksandstein. Grundsätzlich sollte jedweder Ballast selbstverständlich witterungsbeständig sein, da ansonsten die Lagesicherheit der Photovoltaik-Anlage über ihre Lebensdauer nicht sichergestellt ist.

Eon realisiert Inselnetz mit Erneuerbaren und Speicher in Schweden

Eon realisiert Inselnetz mit Erneuerbaren und Speicher in Schweden


Die etwa 140 Haushalte in Simris in der südschwedischen Region Scania werden künftig komplett mit erneuerbarer Energie versorgt. Dafür sorgen Windräder mit 500 Kilowatt und Photovoltaik-Anlagen mit 440 Kilowatt Gesamtleistung sowie ein Batteriespeicher mit 800 Kilowatt, wie Eon am Mittwoch mitteilte. Der Energiekonzern sieht nach eigenen Angaben ein großes Projektziel darin, dass trotz volatiler Einspeisung von Photovoltaik- und Windkraftanlagen die Kunden keinen Qualitätsunterschied bei der Stromversorgung feststellen. Die Kunden vor Ort sollen daher „zu flexiblen, intelligenten Prosumern“ werden. Sie erzeugten mit Photovoltaik-Anlagen Strom und verfügten gleichzeitig über Verbrauchsgeräte wie Wärmepumpen, mit denen die Last regelbar sei. Das System ist Eon zufolge in der Lage, Stromspitzen gezielt auszugleichen und die Erzeugung wirtschaftlicher zu gestalten. Dennoch sei während der Projektphase auch möglich, Simris „ohne spürbare Verzögerung an das regionale Versorgungsnetz“ anzuschließen, um die Versorgungssicherheit zu gewährleisten.
Das Projekt sei wichtig auf dem Weg zur weiteren Entwicklung von intelligenten Netzen. „Mit der richtigen Technik und intelligenten Lösungen zeigen wir in Simris bereits heute, dass eine dezentrale, erneuerbare und gleichzeitig komfortable Energiezukunft möglich ist”, sagt Eon-Vorstand Leonhard Birnbaum. Auf der Website des Energiekonzerns könnten die Einwohner des schwedischen Ortes in Echtzeit die Stromerzeugung und den Verbrauch sowie den Ladezustand der Batterie verfolgen.
Das Inselnetz von Simris ist Teil des EU-Vorhabens „Interflex“. Insgesamt sechs Projekte in Europa würden dabei umgesetzt, um verschiedene intelligente Netztechnologien zu untersuchen, Netzengpässe zu beseitigen und einen steigenden Anteil erneuerbarer Energien in der Stromversorgung zu ermöglichen. „Interflex“ ist auf drei Jahre angelegt und startete zu Jahresbeginn. Insgesamt sind Eon zufolge 20 Projektpartner beteiligt. Besondere Schwerpunkte seien Energiespeicherung, intelligente Ladelösungen für Elektrofahrzeuge, Lastüberwachung, Inselbetrieb, Netzautomation sowie die Integration verschiedener Energieträger wie Gas, Wärme und Strom. Ein weiteres „Interflex“-Projekt setzt die Eon-Tochter Avacon derzeit in Niedersachsen um.

Saga Energy will für 2,5 Milliarden Euro Zwei-Gigawatt-Solarpark im Iran bauen

Saga Energy will für 2,5 Milliarden Euro Zwei-Gigawatt-Solarpark im Iran bauen


Das norwegische Photovoltaik-Unternehmen Saga Energy hat eine Vereinbarung über 2,5 Milliarden Euro mit Amin Energy aus dem Iran unterzeichnet. Es geht dabei um den Bau einer Photovoltaik-Anlage mit zwei Gigawatt Gesamtleistung, wie die Nachrichtenagentur Reuters meldete. Das Unternehmen bestätigte pv magazine den Bericht. Saga Energy ist Teil der Delta Gruppe, die auf Leistungselektronik und Wechselrichter spezialisiert ist. In einigen Berichten heißt es, dass für die Finalisierung des Vertrags noch wirtschaftliche Garantien der iranischen Regierung ausstünden. Wahrscheinlich kämen diese vom Ministerium für erneuerbare Energien (SABTA).
Iran hat sich das ehrgeizige Ziel gesetzt, fünf Gigawatt Leistung bei erneuerbare Energien bis 2022 zu installieren. Dafür sind großzügige Einspeisevergütungen für große Photovoltaik-Anlagen eingeführt worden, die bereits eine Vielzahl europäischer Investoren angelockt haben, darunter KPV Solar aus Österreich und Quercus aus Großbritannien. Letztere wollen einen 600-Megawatt-Solarpark im Zentraliran entwickeln.
Nach Einschätzung von SABTA ist das Ziel von fünf Gigawatt ausschließlich mit ausländischen Privatinvestoren zu erreichen. Saga Energy ist den Berichten zufolge von Banken, Pensionsfonds und norwegischen Exportgarantien abhängig, um den Zwei-Gigawatt-Plan zu finanzieren. Für den erzeugten Solarstrom wird SABTA voraussichtlich einen Stromabnahmevertrag mit 25 Jahren Laufzeit abschließen sowie diese Zahlungen dann wohl alle sechs Monate leisten.
Nach der Reuters-Meldung ist es ein großes Ziel von Saga Energy, ein Modulwerk im Iran zu bauen. Gemäß der derzeitigen Regelung erhalten Betreiber eine um 30 Prozent höhere Einspeisevergütung, wenn ein Teil der Komponenten vor Ort hergestellt wird. Rune Haaland, Sprecher von Saga Energy, sagte Reuters, dass die Konstruktion der Zwei-Gigawatt-Anlage im Iran über die nächsten vier bis fünf Jahre erfolgen solle. „Saga und das litauische Unternehmen Solitek werden Solarmodule dafür produzieren, während Delta Electronics die Wechselrichter bereitstellt“, so Haaland.

All We Know About the Tesla Mass Firings and the Legal Battle to Follow

All We Know About the Tesla Mass Firings and the Legal Battle to Follow

The EV maker has dismissed a large number of workers from its hub in California after an extensive company-wide annual review.

Tesla Inc. fired 400 employees this week. Included in the cull are associates, team leaders, and supervisors. The mass firing was the result of a company-wide annual review, Tesla said in an emailed statement to Reuters.
They didn’t confirm exactly how many employees would be leaving the luxury electric vehicle maker moving forward. However, it's estimated to reach up to 700 total employees.
"We don’t know how high up it went," said the former employee, who worked on the assembly line and did not want to be identified to Reuters.
Despite never receiving bad reviews, the employee states he was still fired after Tesla claimed performance was the reason for the dismissals and that most of those fired were outside of the manufacturing side of the business.
“Like all companies, Tesla conducts an annual performance review during which a manager and employee discuss the results that were achieved, as well as how those results were achieved, during the performance period,” a Tesla spokesperson said.
“This includes both constructive feedback and recognition of top performers with additional compensation and equity awards, as well as promotions in many cases. As with any company, especially one of over 33,000 employees, performance reviews also occasionally result in employee departures. Tesla is continuing to grow and hire new employees around the world.”
Vehicles

Elon Musk Says Tesla Will Reveal Its Semi Truck Next Month

Tesla is currently struggling to expand its manufacturing and production line thanks to a 450,000 pre-order wait list for the new Model 3 sedan. So far the EV maker is missing targets left and right, having only produced 260 cars last quarter, blaming a manufacturing bottleneck on the issue. The initial goal was 1,500 cars.
Previously, Musk had promised investors that a focus on Model 3 production would eventually lead to building 10,000 cars a week.
Michael Harley, Managing Editor at Kelley Blue Book and Autotrader told Mercury News,
“It’s no secret that Tesla’s Model 3 development and ramp-up for production has been derailed,” Harley said. “A major change in staff – whether dismissal or layoff – is an indication that there is an upper-level movement to put the train back on the tracks.”
This isn’t the first time Tesla has been in hot water with its employees; the company had a hearing before the National Labor Relations Board in November after it was alleged that company supervisors and security guards harassed workers who were distributing union pamphlets. Tesla has since denied these accusations.

Production Hell

Musk joked to employees in a tweet that it would be a hellish time for the company to meet his goal of half a million electric vehicles delivered in 2018 and 20,000 Model 3s each month until December of this year.
Another reason for the trouble might just be welding woes; the steel Model 3 requires more spot welding than the previous models which were mostly made of aluminum and required more adhesive than melted steel. The assembly line was also only recently finished at the end of September, forcing many workers to put together cars in a separate area of the factory.
All We Know About the Tesla Mass Firings and the Legal Battle to Follow
Source: Elon Musk/Twitter
"The learning curve is pretty steep,” Ron Harbour, a manufacturing consultant at Oliver Wyman told Automotive news regarding the problems at the factory.

Update: 

The war between Musk's Tesla and former employees just got heated. 
"Seems like performance has nothing to do with it," one Tesla employee told CNBC under the condition of anonymity. "Those terminated were generally the highest paid in their position," this person said, suggesting that the firings were driven by an urge to cut costs. 
Most of the people let go have been from Tesla's motor's business, not from other facets of the company, such as Powerwall which is currently focused on resupplying power to Puerto Rico. Employees also claim that they were given no warning and received an email from Tesla, stating that they shouldn't come to work the next day. 
In addition to this issue, three former employees are claiming they were racially discriminated against while working with Tesla. Stating that they endured racial slurs from supervisors in the Fremont Factory. However, the employees never reported the issue to Equal Employment Opportunity Commission or the Department of Fair Employment and Housing. They also never raised concerns while they worked at the factory. 
Tesla responded with a statement to Fortune,
“Tesla takes any and every form of discrimination or harassment extremely seriously,” a Tesla spokesperson said in an email statement to the magazine. “In situations where Tesla is at fault, we will never seek to avoid responsibility. But in this instance, from what we know so far, this does not seem to be such a case.”

Quelle: Automotive Reuters

SolarNow financing facility aiming to reach 70% of rural Uganda with off-grid systems

SolarNow financing facility aiming to reach 70% of rural Uganda with off-grid systems


Having been structured as a bankruptcy-remote special purpose vehicle, thanks to the facility, a larger portion of the Ugandan population will soon have access to off-grid electricity through the installation of these solar home systems.
This facility is the second of SolarNow’s structured asset finance instruments, with this particular one known as SAFI. SAFI has been built as a bankruptcy-remote special purpose vehicle for solar companies installing systems throughout the country through a pay-as-you-go system, and solar leasing models in developing countries. This allows them to expand their reach and give access to energy to a much larger portion of the Ugandan population.
With SunFunder leading the effort, each lender provided $2 million to the facility. Even though this is SolarNow’s second SAFI ( structured asset finance instrument)transaction, it was the first syndicated SAFI to be introduced to the market. SunFunder, while acting as an arranger, lender and facility agent, organized the construction of the facility, hand-in-hand with Oikocredit and alongside coordination with an energy fund that concentrated on energy access, which was further managed by responsAbility Investments acting as co-investors.
This is the fifth transaction SolarNow and SunFunder have completed together, each showing the more sophisticated nature developing with larger and more complex installations.
The CEO of SolarNow was enthusiastic about the project. “We are thrilled to continue building our fruitful relationship with SunFunder. So far, it has allowed us to focus entirely on our growth and profitability reaching more than 25,000 clients. This new step of our partnership will enable us to continue tackling the massive unmet market opportunity in East Africa of providing affordable energy to millions of off-grid households, and to reach 70% of Uganda’s off-grid population with solar home systems.”
Speaking on behalf of responsAbility, Stefan Issler said: “Access to energy is a core topic when it comes to developing economies. By channelling financing to companies like SolarNow, we actively develop markets and infrastructure, thereby addressing the basic needs of broad sections of the population”
Maite Pina, Investment Officer at Oikocredit said: “With this securitization Oikocredit demonstrated its commitment to supporting SolarNow and Off-grid in the long-term. We see SolarNow as a company that prioritises its customers in order to meet their needs with the right solar products and services. It is also important to us that SolarNow aims to contribute towards Uganda’s development and economy.”

DEWA announces new R&D subsidiary

DEWA announces new R&D subsidiary


The aim of the investment company will be to look for opportunities linked to R&D and innovation. DEWA’s standing as a leading utility, and a sustainability and energy leader is looking to be enhanced in the Middle East, North Africa and the Gulf Cooperation Council region.
“The launch of the new investment company supports the National Innovation Strategy, launched by His Highness Sheikh Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum, Vice President and Prime Minister of the UAE, and Ruler of Dubai, to make the UAE one of the most innovative countries in the world. DEWA gives priority to innovation, R&D, sustainability and renewable energy. JEI Silicon Valley will be instrumental in helping DEWA to achieve its vision to become a sustainable innovative world-class utility,” said Al Tayer at the announcement of the subsidiary.
He continued “Strategically located in Silicon Valley, JEI Silicon Valley will look for investment opportunities into start-ups with technologies that are of interest to DEWA, and establish and maintain institutional relations with venture capitalist firms and investment funds to expand the reach of DEWA’s investment portfolio. In R&D, JEI Silicon Valley will identify and build new strategic relationships with R&D centres, universities and research bodies, promote relations with existing partners, and enable direct access to cutting-edge market and industry information to shape new projects and technology focus areas. As an investment company, JEI Silicon Valley will create direct links with the start-up network in Silicon Valley, California and all over the United States, allowing direct communications with start-ups,”
“We are also establishing the largest government accelerator programme in the world, based on a clear framework, innovation, and R&D. This is being done with incubators to identify solutions, and develop renewable energy technologies. We are always working to keep up with the latest international practices, to promote the UAE and Dubai, and to ensure a brighter future for generations to come. DEWA also uses the best international R&D practices for the production, transmission, and distribution of electricity and water services. These are world-class, enhance living standards, and work to achieve the happiness of the community,” added Al Tayer.
“We are currently working to establish an R&D centre at the Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum Solar Park, with a total investment of AED 500 million up to 2020. The work of the centre revolves around four main areas of operation, which include the production of electricity from solar power, smart grid integration, energy efficiency, and water. The centre’s internal laboratories will conduct research on Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs), 3D printing, power electronics and energy efficiency. We will also have external laboratories to test pilot projects and prototypes, conduct field tests on new equipment and technologies, with a focus on removing dust from solar panels, to efficiently produce clean energy while reducing costs,” concluded Al Tayer.

Acciona to deploy 150 MW at Egypt’s Benban solar complex

Acciona to deploy 150 MW at Egypt’s Benban solar complex


Spanish renewable energy company Acciona announced it will construct three PV power plant with a combined capacity of 150 MW in Egypt.
The three facilities, the company, said will be part of the 1.8 GW Benban solar complex in Aswan, southern Egypt , and will require an aggregate investment of $180 million.
The projects will be developed in a 50/50 joint venture with Saudi developer Swicorp, through their common newly created platform Enara Bahrain Spv Wll (ENARA). All of the projects, which are being developed under Egypt’s FIT scheme, were granted a 25-year PPA and will sell power to local state-owned power provider Egyptian Electricity Transmission Company (EETC).
The project is being financed by International Finance Corporation (IFC), a member of the Workd Bank, and Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank (AIIB).
The 1.8 GW Benban solar complex represents the larger portion of the 2 GW of PV capacity allocated by the Egyptian government through its FIT scheme for solar.
The 2 GW target is expected to be achieved via the development of 40 individual solar parks of around 50 MW each as Egypt aims to source 20% of its energy from renewables by 2020.

SunPower wins 291 MW PV deal in second round of French tender

SunPower wins 291 MW PV deal in second round of French tender

,

SunPower, a U.S.-headquartered developer of high efficiency solar panels, has confirmed today that it will supply 291 MW of modules to PV projects being developed under the second round of France’s CRE tender process.
The deal follows an earlier supply deal agreed with SunPower – which is majority-owned by French power giant Total – and takes the amount of high-efficiency modules supplied to rounds one and two of France’s tenders to 505 MW, which is more than any other brand, SunPower says.
Specifically, SunPower will supply its E-Series solar panels to second-round projects. These modules boast a 30% increased energy yield over 25 year, the company claims, and are also Cradle to Cradle certified Silver, meaning that the panels have a verifiable green footprint throughout their production.
“SunPower solar panels deliver cost-competitive and proven long-term reliability, so we are proud to play a significant role in serving France’s goals for clean, renewable solar power,” said SunPower executive VP Peter Aschenbrenner.
Solar projects expected to be developed under the CRE second round tender in France include large-scale ground-mounted arrays, carport projects, rooftop installations and a smattering of storage-backed self-consumption projects in some of France’s overseas territories and non-interconnected zones.

Powin scores financing from Brookfield for 8.8 MW storage project

Powin scores financing from Brookfield for 8.8 MW storage project


The construction-to-term project financing will help Powin Energy complete the energy storage system in Stratford, Ontario, by the end of this year. Upon completion, the Oregon-based company claims the system will be the biggest contracted energy storage project in Canada. Mississauga-based construction firm EllisDon started building the project in July, while work began on the lithium iron phosphate (LFP) battery array at the end of August.
“Securing non-resource financing is a critical step for energy storage assets themselves as well as the broader market,” said Geoffrey Brown, President of Powin Energy.
The Ontario Independent Electricity System Operator (IESO) has contracted the system as part of its efforts to offer critical ancillary services such as voltage control and reactive support to the grid. The storage array will include 300 Powin Energy Stack140 systems housed in a purpose-built warehouse, all of which will be connected to inverters from Dublin-based Eaton and California’s EPC Power.
Powin Energy will have completed more than 50 MWh of utility-scale battery storage capacity by the end of this year. Its total contracted backlog currently stands at roughly 70 MWh.
In June, the company revealed plans to work with Hecate Energy on 12.8 MW/52.8 MWh of storage at sites in Kitchener and Stratford, Ontario. In August, it signed a deal to build 26 MWh of energy storage capacity for San Diego Gas & Electric (SDG&E). It also revealed a plan to pair 2.4 MWh of energy storage with solar for Adon Renewables at seven sites in Hawaii. And in September, Powin Energy agreed to build a 2 MW/8 MWh energy storage system for Southern California Edison in Irvine, California.