Gesamtzahl der Seitenaufrufe

Follower

Freitag, 28. April 2017

NB Power will explore potential 100-MW hydropower facility in Canada

NB Power will explore potential 100-MW hydropower facility in Canada

 
NB Power has begun environmental and geotechnical studies, and site testing to explore the potential for a new 100-MW generating station in Grand Falls beside its existing 66-MW Grand Falls hydropower project on Saint John River in New Brunswick, Canada, according to a company press release.
The cost of the proposed project is not immediately available and no timetable was given for the potential project’s completion. The company did say combined renewable generation capacity of the proposed and existing stations would be 166 MW and the project would require construction of various new structures, including a second tunnel.
NB Power is also contemplating becoming a minority investor in the proposed Atlantic Link submarine electricity transmission project.
In January, HydroWorld.com reported the Atlantic Link will be 100% owned by Emera, with NB Power holding an option to participate as minority investor. Stakeholder and permitting activities are under way, and the line will be in service by the end of 2022, according to Emera.
“We are pleased that NB Power is exploring all potential clean energy options,” said New Brunswick Premier, Brian Gallant. “A new generating station in Grand Falls would be positive for the New Brunswick economy. We will work with the people of the region as the project moves through the appropriate phases.”
The field studies, along with engagement with First Nations and local residents, would form the basis for an application for an environmental impact assessment and NB Power said it plans to submit the application later this year.
“This project is in the early stages and will require study, fieldwork, engineering and environmental approvals prior to going ahead. If feasible, it would be an important source of clean energy to our fleet and, we believe, would provide NB Power with even greater capability to provide generation for our customers inside the province and possibly in the New England market,” said NB Power President and Chief Executive Officer, Gaëtan Thomas. “We look forward to speaking with people in the region about the potential of the project in the months ahead.”
New Brunswick has a few small hydroelectric facilities and is considering developing additional plants. The province is not a large player in the hydro market, but it is working its way through green energy requirements it must begin implementing within the next five to 10 years, according to a 2016 analysis by Chris Ball, executive vice president of Corpfinance International Ltd.
“This means there will be opportunity for local independent power producers as the province and New Brunswick Power work towards increasing their capacity from renewable sources,” he said. “NB Power has identified a goal of generating 40% of in-province energy through renewables, including small hydro, up from 30%.”
After completing a US$2.3 million study begun in 2013, in December 2016 NB Power announced it would prolong the life of the 672-MW Mactaquac hydroelectric generating station on St. John River. The project is expected to cost $3.6 billion and will allow the plant to operate until 2068, at which time it will be 100 years old.

Big Solar is Struggling, and That’s Okay

Big Solar is Struggling, and That’s Okay

 
Several national residential solar brands have faced financial hurdles over the past year, but, with system offerings that often come at a price premium over smaller local installers, that may not be a bad thing for consumers.
Even as the residential solar sector continued its trend of strong annual growth, expanding at a slowed but still impressive 19 percent in 2016, two major national brands declared bankruptcy, creating waves of uncertainty throughout the big solar industry. About a year ago SunEdison, one of the largest renewable energy companies in the country, filed for bankruptcy. It has since been broken up and sold-off to the highest bidder. Just last month, Sungevity followed suit, declaring bankruptcy and shedding more than 300 employees. Energy giant NRG also scaled back its solar operations to concentrate on commercial and utility-scale solar, and struggling residential leader SolarCity was acquired by Tesla.
These are disturbing developments for big players in the residential solar market, but it may ultimately be good news for solar consumers. While fewer choices would appear to be bad news for households looking to go solar, the decline of national solar brands could largely be the result of competitive pricing from lesser-known, but more agile, local solar companies. Evidence is beginning to pile up that big solar may not be offering the best solar deal in town.

recent study released by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) came to the conclusion that solar quotes from big installers average about 10 percent higher than those coming from smaller companies. This means that systems from larger solar companies could be costing consumers thousands of dollars more than if they would have gone with the local guy.
Similarly, the solar cost analysis website Cost to Install Solar (CIS) found that SolarCity, which tops their list of most residential solar installations over the past two years, charges customers an average of 12 percent more than competitors active in the same areas. Solar systems from Vivant, No. 2 in installations, come at a 3 percent premium. This isn’t true for all big solar installers. Bankrupt Sungevity, for instance, ranks No. 4 in installations with pricing that was 19 percent lower than competitors. However, that still puts Sungevity at No. 140 in price competitiveness out of about 1,000 companies analyzed.
In looking at competitive system pricing, much smaller companies tend to top the list — companies like South West Sun Solar, A1 Sun, Bright Life Solar, and Clean Energy Solutions. None of these companies are active in more than one area, and each has a fraction of the number of installations by large installers over the same period. In fact, none of the top 30 lowest priced companies are active across multiple regions.
So, how are these little guys out-competing some of the big names? According to NREL researchers, overhead costs could have a lot to do with it. Operating a solar business across different states can be expensive, raising the cost of business that must be recovered through system pricing. Customer acquisition costs may be another factor. It costs the average installer about 60 cents per watt to lock-in a new residential solar customer, but two of the top national brands, SolarCity and Sunrun, have acquisition costs around 90 cents per watt, which nearly accounts for the 10 percent premium that NREL found.
None of this means customers can’t still get a good competitive deal from a large installer. In fact, CIS found that Sunrun prices tend to be about 30 percent lower than competitors. What it does mean is that well-known brands don’t necessarily deliver the best prices, and consumers would be wise to shop around and compare quotes from multiple solar companies, both big and small, when considering a home solar system. There will likely always be a role for big national players in the residential solar market, but local solar installers, like local roofing and plumbing companies, may increasingly become the go-to source for many home solar installations as the residential sector continues to evolve.
Lead image credit: plien via Flickr

GWEC Annual Wind Power Update, Short Term Forecast More than 800 GW Globally by 2021

GWEC Annual Wind Power Update, Short Term Forecast More than 800 GW Globally by 2021

 
We have just released our Global Wind Report — Annual Market Update at Windergy in Delhi, detailing how in 2016, more than 54 GW of clean renewable wind power was installed across the global market, which now comprises more than 90 countries, including nine with more than 10,000 MW installed, and 29 which have now passed the 1,000-MW mark.
Cumulative capacity grew by 12.6 percent to reach a total of 486.8 GW. Wind power penetration levels continue to increase, led by Denmark pushing 40 percent, followed by Uruguay, Portugal and Ireland with well over 20 percent, Spain and Cyprus around 20 percent, Germany at 16 percent; and the big markets of China, the U.S. and Canada get 4, 5.5, and 6 percent of their power from wind, respectively.
Looking at our rolling five-year forecast, we see just under 60 GW installed globally in 2017, a more or less flat 2018 and then growth again out through the end of the decade to bring total installations up to just over 800 GW by the end of 2021, with the annual market rising to 75 GW in that year.
Global growth will continue to be driven by Asian markets. While we expect the Chinese market to increase a bit in 2017 due to the imminent feed-in-tariff reduction (and a spurt in offshore), it is unlikely to repeat its 2015 record of more than 30 GW, at least in the medium term.
2017 is likely to be another strong year for India. Elsewhere in Asia, Japan and Korea will continue to grow slowly, but we’re looking at increasing strength in the market in Pakistan, an impending surge in the Philippines, a new offshore market in Taiwan, and the ‘next big thing’ in Vietnam, pending critical regulatory changes, which are expected during the course of this year. Overall, we expect the Asian market to add 154 GW in the next five years, for a total of 357 GW by the end of 2021.

We expect Europe to proceed in line with its 2020 targets, and the evaluation of the Commission’s proposals for the post 2020 renewables regime, along with a strengthening Euro-zone economy, give rise to cautious optimism. We expect Europe to install about 73 GW of new wind power in the period out to 2021.
Offshore installations are expected to be up again in 2017, as well as in subsequent years, with much greater growth after 2020 given 2016’s (and 2017’s) dramatic price reductions. A number of countries have announced they are considering accelerating their offshore programs in light of the price points which have been reached in the past year.
North America as a whole looks pretty solid. After the deal struck at the end of 2015 for the extension and phase out of the production tax credit, the U.S. wind industry entered its longest ever period of policy stability and the 2016 market numbers bear this out. The results of the 2016 elections initially caused concern, but continued support at the state level, wind power’s increasingly competitive pricing and the more than 100,000 jobs (and growing) in the sector all bode well for a strong U.S. market for the next several years.
While the Canadian market is off its peak installation period of 1-1.5 GW/year from 2011-2015, we expect stable markets of .7-1 GW going forward. Mexico should have its first year installing more than 1,000 MW in 2017, in line with the new energy reform and government targets. Overall, we expect 61.5 GW to be installed in the North American region over the next five years.
The cancellation of all auctions in Brazil in 2016 due to the political and economic crisis is the dark spot in an otherwise bright picture for Latin America as a whole. Brazil’s market was down to just over 2 GW and although installations are expected to remain at least at that level through 2017, unless there are new auctions then the country’s newly established supply chain will be in trouble.
Elsewhere, we have a vibrant new market in Argentina, a dramatically strengthened Chilean market, the end of the big build-out in Uruguay and continued growth in Peru. The small markets in Central America will continue to make a contribution, and new climate and energy targets in the CARICOM countries mean that there will be significant activity there, although small in absolute terms. Overall, we expect just under 25 GW of new installations in the region in the period out to 2021.
After a relatively quiet 2016, we expect the Africa and Middle East region to start growing again this year. In South Africa, we hope the standoff with ESKOM will break, unleashing an enormous backlog of projects, and the government’s new Integrated Resource Plan, if it becomes policy, will facilitate this key African market’s reaching its potential.
Elsewhere in the region, Kenya’s 310-MW Lake Turkana project is now ready for commissioning, and we expect the initial buildout from last year’s auction in Morocco to begin this year, and carry on through 2020. There is also a pipeline of projects in Ethiopia; and we hope that the bottlenecks will be removed in Egypt so that country can begin to fulfill its potential as well as government targets. Overall, we expect just over 12 GW to be installed in the Africa and Middle East region over the coming five years out to 2021.
After a very quiet 2016 where the only installations in the Pacific were 140 MW in Australia, we expect that the settlement of the Renewable Energy Target issue will drive substantial new growth in Australia. Increased investment has led to a pipeline of more than 1,500 MW of new wind projects either under construction or with construction expected to begin this year.
We don’t see much activity in the rest of the region in the near future, and Australia will be the main market driver leading to the installations of about 4.7 GW in the Pacific region in the period out to 2021.
This is how we see it as of late-April 2017. No doubt we will have both positive and negative surprises (there always are), but we have a lot of confidence in the wind power market going forward, as the technology continues to improve, prices continue to come down and the call for clean, renewable power to reduce emissions, clean our air and create new jobs and new industries only gets stronger with each passing year.
See more details in our freshly released Global Wind Market Report
Lead image credit: Jason Bickley

Mehr als 11.600 Elektroautos im ersten Quartal neu zugelassen

Mehr als 11.600 Elektroautos im ersten Quartal neu zugelassen

Laden_Elektroauto_Ladepunkt_Berlin_Deutschland
Das Zentrum für Sonnenenergie- und Wasserstoff-Forschung Baden-Württemberg (ZSW) hat im ersten Quartal 2017 einen Rekordzuwachs für Elektroautos in Deutschland registriert. Insgesamt seien 11.624 Elektrofahrzeuge neu zugelassen, darunter 5060 rein batterieelektrisch betriebene PKW sowie 5264 Pkw mit zusätzlichem Verbrennungsmotor dazugekommen, teilte das Stuttgarter Institut am Donnerstag mit. Künftig werde das ZSW die Daten monatlich aktualisieren. Dabei werde auch ein Vergleich zu anderen Ländern sowie eine Aufschlüsslung nach Herstellern, Modellen oder Fahrzeugtypen bereitgestellt.
Gemeinsam mit Zahlen zur Entwicklung erneuerbarer Energien seien sie im Internet abrufbar. Die Daten zur Erzeugung von Photovoltaik, Windkraft und anderen erneuerbaren Energien würden dabei in Kooperation mit dem BDEW angeboten. „Mit unserem Datenservice möchten wir Medien, Politik, Verbänden und allen interessierten Bürgern eine aktuelle, solide Informationsbasis zur Verfügung stellen“, sagt Maike Schmidt, Leiterin des ZSW-Fachgebiets „Systemanalyse“. Das Daten-Angebot solle künftig noch weiter ausgebaut werden. Das Monitoring und die Evaluation des Energiewende-Fortschritts gehören zu den wichtigsten Arbeitsgebieten dieses Fachressorts.

Wacker Chemie sieht derzeit schwieriges Polysilizium-Marktumfeld

Wacker Chemie sieht derzeit schwieriges Polysilizium-Marktumfeld

Zu_klein_Wacker_tennessee_polysilizium
Wacker Chemie ist mit dem Start in das neue Geschäftsjahr teilweise zufrieden. Allerdings herrsche derzeit für das Polysilizium-Geschäft ein schwieriges Marktumfeld vor. „Die Spotmarktpreise für Solarsilizium haben in den letzten Wochen deutlich nachgegeben“, erklärte Konzernchef Rudolf Staudigl am Donnerstag bei der Veröffentlichung der Zahlen für das erste Quartal. „Grundsätzlich aber erwarten wir in diesem Jahr für den weltweiten Photovoltaik-Markt weiteres Wachstum. Das wird sich positiv auf die Nachfrage nach Polysilizium auswirken.“
Im ersten Quartal 2017 habe der Umsatz des Polysilizium-Geschäfts von Wacker Chemie bei 268,1 Millionen Euro gelegen. Dies seien zwei Prozent weniger als im Vorjahresquartal sowie zehn Prozent weniger als im Vorquartal. Der Rückgang sei der niedrigeren Absatzmenge geschuldet. Dagegen seien die Preise im Vergleich höher gewesen, was die Umsatzentwicklung noch begünstigt habe. In den letzten Wochen seien die Preise aber signifikant gesunken. „Der Geschäftsbereich hat diese Situation genutzt, um seine Lagerbestände in Asien zu erhöhen und so die Lieferzeiten zu seinen dortigen Kunden deutlich zu verkürzen“, erklärte Wacker Chemie zur aktuellen Situation. Das EBITDA des Geschäftsbereichs lag mit 70,5 Millionen Euro knapp 80 Prozent über dem Vorjahresergebnis, was durch hohe Anlaufkosten für das neue US-Werk belastet war. Gegenüber dem Vorquartal sei das EBITDA um knapp 19 Prozent gesunken. Zum Jahresende hatte ein Sonderertrag von 13,3 Millionen Euro aus einbehaltenen erhaltenden Anzahlungen eines Photovoltaik-Kundens das Ergebnis maßgeblich verbessert.
Insgesamt hat Wacker Chemie seinen Umsatz im ersten Quartal im rund acht Prozent auf 1218,8 Millionen Euro steigern können. Dabei sei ein EBITDA von 229,3 Millionen Euro erwirtschaftet worden – ebenfalls eine Steigerung im Jahresvergleich. Das Konzernergebnis vor Zinsen und Steuern (EBIT) habe im ersten Quartal bei 73,2 Millionen Euro gelegen, eine Steigerung von 14 Prozent gegenüber dem Vorjahresergebnis. Alle Ergebnisse seien nach der Entkonsolidierung von Siltronic angepasste Werte.
Nach dem Abgang dieses Segments passte Wacker Chemie auch seine Prognose für das laufende Jahr an. Der Umsatz solle weiterhin um einen mittleren einstelligen Prozentsatz gegenüber dem Vorjahr verbessert werden. Das EBITDA werde hingegen voraussichtlich um einen mittleren einstelligen Prozentwert zurückgehen. Das Konzernergebnis wiederum werde sich wegen des Gewinns aus dem Verkauf von Silitronic gegenüber dem Vorjahr vervielfachen, hieß es weiter. Mitte März hatte der Konzern die Mehrheit an der Tochter abgegeben und aus dem Aktienverkauf insgesamt mehr als 350 Millionen Euro erlöst.

AEE fordert zusätzlichen Erneuerbaren-Ausbau für Klimaschutz

AEE fordert zusätzlichen Erneuerbaren-Ausbau für Klimaschutz

Das RWE-Kraftwerk Weisweiler
Zwischen dem Ziel, die Treibhausgasemissionen bis 2020 im Vergleich zum Jahr 1990 um 40 Prozent zu reduzieren und dem bisherigen Fortschritt von 27,6 Prozent, klafft eine wachsende Klimalücke. Um diesen Trend zu stoppen, sind nach Angaben von Philipp Vohrer, Geschäftsführer der Agentur für Erneuerbare Energien (AEE), zusätzliche Anstrengungen beim Ausbau von erneuerbaren Energien, die Steigerung der Energieeffizienz und eine kontinuierliche Verringerung der Energieerzeugung aus fossilen Quellen notwendig.
Auch 2016 sei zum wiederholten Male der Ausstoß von klimaschädlichen Treibhausgasen in Deutschland nicht gesunken. Dem Umweltbundesamt zufolge wurden im vorigen Jahr insgesamt knapp 906 Millionen Tonnen Kohlendioxidäquivalente freigesetzt. Das entspreche einem Anstieg um vier Millionen Tonnen im Vergleich zu 2015.
AEE_UBA_Treibhausgasausstoss_Klimaschutzluecke_apr17_72dpi
Ein wesentlicher Grund dafür sei, dass der Verkehrssektor 5,4 Millionen Tonnen Treibhausgase (+3,4 Prozent) mehr als im Jahr davor ausgestoßen habe. Nach AEE-Angaben sind die Zunahme im Straßengüterverkehr und das anhaltende Verkehrswachstum die Hauptverursacher für diese Entwicklung. Gleichzeitig sei der Anteil von Biokraftstoffen noch immer zu gering. Neben dem Verkehrssektor sei auch der Treibhausgasausstoß von privaten Haushalten gestiegen. Dabei zeige die Wärmeversorgung von Gebäuden immer noch eine Witterungsabhängigkeit, was ein Zeichen für mangelnde Gebäudeenergieeffizienz sei.
Die Industrie hingegen habe durch Effizienzgewinne das stetige Wirtschaftswachstum kompensiert und stagniere bei den Emissionen. Lediglich die Energiewirtschaft konnte durch die Reduzierung von Braun- und Steinkohlekraftwerken, die gestiegenen Emissionen aus der Nutzung von Erdgas ausgleichen und den Ausstoß des „Klimakillers“ senken, wie die AEE weiter berichtet. Erneuerbare Energien hätten jedoch kaum zur Minderung beigetragen.
Sollte sich der Trend fortsetzen, werde Deutschland seine Klimaschutzziele deutlich verfehlen und die Klimaschutzlücke weiter wachsen. Damit Deutschland noch die eigenen Vorgaben noch erreichen könne, müsse nach Angaben von Vohrer der Treibhausgasausstoß jährlich um fast 40 Millionen Tonnen Kohlendioxidäquivalente reduziert werden.

Suniva-Petition in USA könnte neuen globalen Photovoltaik-Handelsstreit auslösen

Suniva-Petition in USA könnte neuen globalen Photovoltaik-Handelsstreit auslösen

US_ITC_Internationale_Handelskommission
Suniva Inc. hat am Mittwoch bei der Internationalen Handelskommission der USA (USITC) eine Petition nach Section 201 nach dem Handelsgesetz von 1974 beantragt. Dieses sogenannte „global safeguard“-Verfahren ist in den USA bislang selten genutzt worden und die Entscheidung über Maßnahmen, die alle Photovoltaik-Hersteller außerhalb der USA betreffen würde, liegt allein bei der ITC sowie dem US-Präsidenten Donald Trump. Voraussetzung für Ausgleichsmaßnahmen ist, dass ein schwerer Schaden für die heimischen Photovoltaik-Hersteller durch Importe nachgewiesen wird.
In dem Antrag fordert Suniva die Einführung von Mindestimportpreisen für kristalline Solarmodule in Höhe von 78 US-Dollarcent pro Watt und für kristalline Solarzellen von 40 US-Dollarcent pro Watt. Für die Jahre danach sind in der Petition jeweils leichte Absenkungen der Mindestimportpreise vorgesehen. Im vierten Jahr der Maßnahmen sollten sie demnach bei 68 US-Dollarcent pro Watt für Solarmodule und 33 US-Dollarcent für Solarzellen liegen, wie die Analysten von GTM Research berichten.
Die Petition von Suniva, das vor zehn Tagen in den USA Insolvenz nach Chapter 11 beantragte und mehrheitlich zum chinesischen Photovoltaik-Konzern Shunfeng gehört, beinhaltet noch drei weitere Forderungen. So sollten die Einnahmen aus den seit 2012 geltenden Anti-Dumping- und Anti-Subventionszölle für chinesische Photovoltaik-Hersteller an die US-Unternehmen ausgeschüttet werden. Es werde eine Verteilung auf Grundlage der Produktionskapazitäten vorgeschlagen. Je 25 Prozent der Einnahmen sollten an die kristallinen Zell- und Modulhersteller in den USA gehen, 10 Prozent an die Silizium-, Ingot- und Waferproduzenten sowie 20 Prozent an einen Fonds, der vom US-Handelsministerium verwaltet werden und sich um die Wiederbelebung von Fertigungskapazitäten in den USA kümmern solle.
In der dritten Forderung heißt es, dass ein Programm aufgelegt werden soll, dass mit den Einnahmen aus dem „Safeguard“-Verfahren finanziert werden soll. Dabei solle es um den Aufbau neuer Fertigungskapazitäten entlang der kristallinen Photovoltaik-Wertschöpfungskette gehen. Sunivas letzte Forderung geht an Trump. Er solle internationale Handelsverhandlungen einleiten, um die Ursachen für die erhöhten Einfuhren in die USA zu mindern.
Die USITC muss nun binnen 120 Tagen über die Petition entscheiden. Wenn sich die Ermittlungen als „außerordentlich kompliziert“ in dem Fall darstellten, könnte es eine Verlängerung um 30 Tage geben, heißt es in der Veröffentlichung der Behörde. Sofern ein Schaden für die US-Wirtschaft ermittelt werde, würden Maßnahmen empfohlen. Dazu werde es öffentliche Anhörungen geben. Binnen 180 Tagen müsse dann ein Vorschlag an Trump geschickt werden, der schließlich über Art, Höhe und Dauer der Maßnahmen zum Schutz der US-Photovoltaik-Hersteller entschieden werde. Die maximale Länge der Kompensationen betrage für die erste Phase vier Jahre, so die USITC.
Suniva begründete seine Petition damit, dass durch den anhaltenden Anstieg ausländischer Photovoltaik-Importe die US-Hersteller ernsthaft geschädigt würden. Die Ausweitung habe trotz der bestehenden Anti-Dumping- und Anti-Subventionszölle für chinesische Photovoltaik-Hersteller stattgefunden, da diese weiter neue Kapazitäten, vornehmlich außerhalb ihrer Heimat, aufgebaut hätten. Damit verbunden sei auch dass die Überkapazitäten weltweit immer größer würden und es in der Folge zu einem Preisverfall in den USA gekommen sei, der es für die US-Hersteller schwierig mache, wirtschaftlich zu produzieren. Daraus wiederum resultierten dramatische Arbeitsplatzverluste in der gesamten Photovoltaik-Industrie in den vergangenen zwölf Monaten, so Suniva.
Mit seinem Vorstoß hat Suniva bereits Reaktionen in den USA hervorgerufen. Der US-Photovoltaik-Verband SEIA erklärte, dass er noch keine Gelegenheit gehabt habe, die Petition von Suniva eingehend zu prüfen. Dennoch hoffe der Verband, dass die US-Regierung einen Weg finden werde, die Wettbewerbsfähigkeit der heimischen Zell- und Modulhersteller zu stärken, ohne neue Handelsbarrieren zu verhängen. Auch Solarworld USA, das 2012 den Erlass der Anti-Dumping- und Anti-Subventionszölle für die chinesischen Photovoltaik-Hersteller maßgeblich vorangetrieben hatte, wollte den eingebrachten Antrag zunächst eingehender bewerten. Dennoch zeige er auf dramatische Weise, dass die US-Hersteller immer noch einen unfairen Wettbewerb litten, so Juergen Stein, Präsident von Solarworld USA. Es sei aber wichtig, dass alle Maßnahmen, die gegen den unfairen Handel ergriffen würden, alle Teile der Photovoltaik-Wertschöpfungskette in den USA berücksichtigten.
Nach der Analyse von GTM Research sind die Modulpreise für große Bestellungen bei chinesischen Photovoltaik-Hersteller im Laufe des vergangenen Jahres um 38 Prozent gesunken. Ein moderaterer Rückgang werde für dieses Jahr vorhergesagt. Der Grund für den kräftigen Modulpreisverfall 2016 seien die globalen Überkapazitäten gewesen. Vor allem im zweiten Halbjahr seien diese akut gewesen, da die verfügbaren Modulkapazitäten nochmals um zehn Prozent gewachsen seien, während die Nachfrage um 16 Prozent gesunken sei, so die Analysten. Die Modulkapazitäten in den USA hätten sich zwischen 2012 und 2016 auf rund 1,6 Gigawatt nahezu verdoppelt. Im gleichen Zeitraum habe sich das Volumen der Modulimporte mehr als verdreifacht. Zuletzt seien dabei besonders die Modulimporte aus Südostasien (Malaysia, Thailand, Vietnam) und Korea angewachsen. Viele chinesische Photovoltaik-Hersteller bauten in den vergangenen Jahren Fabriken in Südostasien, um auf diese Weise die Anti-Dumping- und Anti-Subventionsmaßnahmen in den USA und Europa zu umgehen. Nach Analyse von GTM Research stieg der Anteil der Importe aus dieser Region von Beginn 2015 bis Ende 2016 von 15 auf 55 Prozent an. Eine Verhängung von Mindestimportpreisen von 78 US-Dollarcent pro Watt entspreche dem Preisniveau chinesischer Importe von 2012. Die Photovoltaik-Systemkosten würden damit auf das Niveau von 2015 steigen, so die erste Einschätzung der Analysten.

Hareon Solar, Azure Power to develop 118 MW PV project in India

Hareon Solar, Azure Power to develop 118 MW PV project in India


Hareon Solar’s Singapore unit and Azure Power Global’s India unit are jointly investing in a 118 MW solar PV plant, with another contract being inked for Hareon to supply the facility with its solar modules for an amount no higher than $40 million.
The Singapore unit intends to invest roughly RMB 76.6 million and thereby acquire a 45% stake in the new project.
The joint venture has already signed a 25-year power purchase agreement with the Indian state-run power producer National Thermal Power Corporation (NTPC).
The Chinese manufacturer entered India’s burgeoning solar market in 2015 with an agreement to develop a 72 MW PV project with India’s ReNew Power. Back then, Hareon experienced a strong year with a net profit of 96.08 million yuan.
However, in 2016 the company swung to a net loss, which according to preliminary statistics amounted to 380 million yuan. As for the reason behind this severe downturn, Hareon remarked that it had seen a “significant decline” in the solar market in the second half of 2016.
Meanwhile, Azure Power’s experienced a prosperous 2016, as its bottom line benefited from the falling projects costs per megawatt, while its operational and pipeline capacity exceeded 1 GW, up from 267 MW in 2015.

Denmark’s Energy Commission says incentives for renewables should be phased-out

Denmark’s Energy Commission says incentives for renewables should be phased-out


Denmark’s Minister for Energy, Utilities and Climate, Lars Chr. Lillehol announced the creation of a new Energy Commission to analyze recent developments in the energy sector and make recommendations for the country’s future energy policies in April 2016.
The commission has now provided a series of recommendations, which will be included in Denmark’s future energy strategy by 2030, and comprise the request to phase-out renewable energy incentives at the same rate as clean power sources become competitively viable.
The authority stressed that a complete change in energy policy is needed, and that the country’s future energy sector should be more market-based. “Concluding the work of the Energy Commission,” said Chairman Niels B. Christiansen, “it is obvious to us that an ambitious energy policy starting as early as 2020 is mandatory if we are to meet our long-term objective of a low-emissions society based on renewable energy in 2050.”
Lillehol has welcomed the commission’s recommendations, claiming that there is no contradiction between being ambitious and focusing on cost. “We need to adjust our energy and climate policies,” Lillehol stated, “in order to gain as much green transition for our expenses as possible. That’s common sense, and I think that the commission has given us some excellent, clear advice as to how we can take the next smart step in Denmark’s green transition.”
In December 2016, Lillehol decided to close the second phase of the incentive scheme for solar (the so-called ‘transitional model’), after revealing that there were 1,660 MW of PV projects under the scheme which were unapproved due to budget issues. The vast majority of these projects, the government stated, was submitted for approval during 2016, after the transitional model was launched in late 2015. The minister claimed that, if approved, these projects would have resulted in an additional cost of DKK 4.5 billion ($659.8 million).
In December 2016, the Danish Parliament also approved the government decision to gradually abolish during the period 2017-22 the Public Service Obligations (PSO) levy, which finances the country’s renewable energy incentives program. Starting from 2023, eventual incentives for renewables, which are currently being financed by power consumers, should be paid with the state budget.
Meanwhile, the country’s cumulative installed PV capacity reached 854.8 MW as of Mar. 3, 2017, according to the latest statistics from Danish energy operator Energinet.dk.
New additions for the first two months of this year totaled only 3.7 MW, while newly installed PV capacity for 2016 was 71.4 MW. This compares to 181.2 MW in 2015, 40.5 MW in 2014, 162.4 MW in 2013, and 373.7 MW in 2012.
Most of the country’s PV capacity was installed under the first phase of the incentive scheme between 2012 and 2013, while the above-mentioned transitional model of the scheme with lower tariffs was mainly responsible for the growth of the past three years.
Energinet.dk expects Denmark will reach an installed PV power of around 2.1 GW by 2025. The country is targeting to become fully independent of fossil fuels by 2050.

India to add 10 GW of solar this year, forecasts Mercom Capital

India to add 10 GW of solar this year, forecasts Mercom Capital


The Indian solar market grew by 4.3 GW in 2016 – a performance that served to turn heads all over the world as the nation arrived at the PV top table.
However, compared to the Indian solar market’s potential this year, 2016 looks positively pedestrian. Analysts Mercom Capital Group have forecast in their new Q1 India Quarterly Market Update report that India will likely add around 10 GW of new solar capacity in 2017.
This prediction is based on a strong first quarter that has seen India boost its cumulative capacity to 12.8 GW. Of that total, 12 GW is utility-scale solar, with rooftop accounting for just 850 MW of capacity nationwide.
In a country of more than 1.2 billion people, there is incredible scope to boost rooftop solar deployment, and this is set to be the focus for many states and investors over the coming years as India accelerates deployment towards its 2022 goal of 100 GW of solar capacity.
However, of that 100 GW target, 40 GW is set aside for large-scale solar parks, and according to Mercom Capital’s analysis, the pipeline for ground-mount projects stands at around 12.6 GW of additional capacity. Further, there is more than 6 GW of solar tenders pending auction.
“Solar in India has come a long way and 2017 is forecasted to be the best year by far,” said Mercom Capital Group CEO Raj Prabhu. “Rapidly falling tariffs have resulted in solar closing in on parity with coal in recent auctions, which is expected to increase demand in the future. However, tender activity has slowed recently and the government needs to address transmission bottlenecks, finances of distribution companies and slowing demand for continued growth.”
In recent months India has seen record low bids in its reverse solar auctions, with the lowest price set so far at the 250 MW Kapada Solar Park in Andhra Pradesh, where the winning bid was $0.048/kWh. Earlier, the Rewa Solar Park auction in Madhya Pradesh attracted a bid of $0.0494/kWh. Prabhu believes that these record lows are being driven by pent-up demand from slowing tender activity, while ever-tumbling solar component costs also play a part, falling around 33% in the past 12 months.
Compared to Q4 2016, when 3.4 GW of capacity was tendered, Q1 2017 saw just 1.9 GW tendered, of which 1 GW was retendered capacity from previous tenders that were undersubscribed. This slowdown is causing some consternation among developers and manufacturers
Looking further ahead, Mercom expects annual installations in 2018 to match or slightly surpass 2017, with a greater proportion of rooftop solar PV added.
While the spread of solar deployment nationwide remains uneven, six states now boast more than 1 GW each of capacity installed. Some 20 states have already introduced net metering policies aimed at boosting rooftop deployment, but in many parts of the country hurdles to residential and C&I solar growth remain.
“Even with some of these challenges,” said Mercom’s MD of communications India, “we expect the Indian solar sector to remain one of the most important markets in the world over the next five years.”

UK energy storage: government in no hurry

UK energy storage: government in no hurry

the Westminster Energy, Environment and Transport Forum (WEETF) took place in London on Tuesday.

The UK’s energy sector is eagerly anticipating the government’s response on the recent call for evidence (CfE) asking for views on how to enable a smarter and flexible energy system. The CfE was a joint move between the government and the country’s energy regulator Ofgem that concluded on 12th January. Since then, the sector has waited patiently for the government’s conclusions. It appears they will need to wait for at least two more months.
Deidre Bell, senior manager at Ofgem, told the Westminster Energy, Environment and Transport Forum (WEETF) that took place in London on Tuesday that the CfE received a total of 240 responses, of which approximately 150 responses mentioned energy storage specifically.
Bell said that an initial analysis of the feedback shows that the CfE has identified the correct barriers, while some additional barriers were raised in the responses, such as the ability of energy storage investors to stack revenues.
Overall, Bell added, there is an agreement among the CfE respondents that for more clarity on the regulatory treatment of storage, (licensing options) are needed and that a definition of energy storage is required. Ofgem and the government consulted on other areas too, like network connecting issues and charging as well as the use of storage by grid operators. The grid charging issues are furthermore addressed in a separate consultation currently in place by Ofgem. Bell, however, declined to comment on future energy policy since the country is facing a snap general election on 8th June.
Stakeholders waiting for the policy
Energy storage stakeholders do need answers to above issues, and urgently, it was argued
Ross Fairley, head of energy, power and utilities at Burges Salmon, a U.K. law firm, told the event that, based on his experience, financing is not impossible. “However,” he said, “all banks we talk to are still trying to get around the revenue streams of energy storage projects. They are asking: what is the security of the various revenue streams? Have investors developed an alternative plan in case that one of the planned revenue streams fails?”
Furthermore, argued Fairley, the revenue and regulatory work in storage projects is different from the renewable energy projects, so therefore an investor cannot apply the usual project development model. “So far, we see most of the energy storage applications concerning co-locating projects along with solar PV and wind installations,” Fairley said.
However, this is only an application of the energy storage technology. As Phil Sheppard, director of system operations at the U.K.’s transmission system operator National Grid remarked, energy storage is not a single product; it offers different routes to market. In brief, Sheppard said that the National Grid sees three markets emerging in the U.K.: ancillary services, network services, and a market around arbitrage opportunities (e.g. behind the meter storage applications).
Overall, there was a sense at the Forum that businesses are ready to engage in various forms of energy storage markets as long as the regulatory framework is clear.
John Prendergast, head of energy storage business development at the RES Group, told the event that he sees strong equity appetite in financing, but this is very much impacted by the policy changes. Specifically, Prendergast said, we need to see the government moving faster in policy making, allowing new energy storage business cases to emerge.
The government does not appear to be in a hurry. An example showing this comes from a relevant, if not more urgent, front: the air quality plan. The government’s original plan was challenged at the court, and was seen as too weak.
The court asked the government to submit an improved air quality plan by Monday 24th April. Not only has the government missed the deadline, but it also applied to delay publishing the draft plan until 30th June because of the forthcoming snap election. In energy storage, the court is not even involved. The government can take its time.

BREAKING: Suniva petition could start new global solar trade war

BREAKING: Suniva petition could start new global solar trade war

Image: U.S. Department of Energy

On the campaign trail U.S. President Donald Trump famously said that he would pull the United States out of global trade deals and renegotiate the terms. Today, bankrupt solar manufacturer Suniva filed a legal petition that could allow him to circumvent those agreements, as least for solar products.
Suniva Inc., which filed for bankruptcy slightly more than a week ago, has filed a petition under Sections 201 and 202 of the Trade Act of 1974. This petition calls for “global safeguard relief” from imports of crystalline silicon solar PV cells and modules, which it says have driven the company to bankruptcy.
If the U.S. International Trade Commission (ITC) approves the petition, the agency will recommend to U.S. President Donald Trump the form of “relief or remedy” to adjust the industry to the import competition, but President Trump will get to make a final decision as to what action to take.
Suniva isn’t waiting for ITC to make a recommendation, and instead offered a request that President Trump impose a four-year minimum import price on PV modules and cells, starting in year one at US$0.78 per watt for modules and $0.40 for cells. This is roughly double the prices for pv modules that pv magazine staff overheard in conversations at the Bloomberg New Energy Finance Future of Energy Summit two days ago.
It is important to note that while international trade agreements prevent most protectionist measures, Section 201 provides a loophole, which is spelled out according to Article 19 of the General Agreement on Trade and Tariffs. Here’s how ITC describes it:
Article XIX of the GATT is sometimes referred to as the escape clause because it permits a country to “escape” temporarily from its obligations under the GATT with respect to a particular product when increased imports of that product are causing or are threatening to cause serious injury to domestic producers.
The news of the Section 201-202 petition comes shortly after the United States imposed new tariffs on softwood lumber from Canada. This sugguests that the Trump Administration, while no fan of solar, is willing to impose strong import restrictions even on nations considered close allies.
However, China, which produces the bulk of the world’s PV cells and modules, has shown that it is also willing to take equally strong action on trade against the United States. Sharp import duties on U.S. polysilicon, widely seen as retaliation for U.S. duties on solar cells, have decimated the U.S. polysilicon industry.
But the actions will likely not be limited to China. Section 201 allows for a “global safeguard”, and a Suniva press release alludes to the movement of Chinese PV makers to Southeast Asia. “Manufacturing has expanded to other countries, particularly in Asia, and increasing imports fueled by a growing global manufacturing overcapacity have caused U.S. market prices to fall to levels that challenge responsible economic operations for U.S. manufacturers,” states Suniva.
Suniva’s petition has already drawn reactions from both SEIA, which opposed previous trade cases against China and Taiwan, as well as SolarWorld, which petitioned for these cases.
“While we have not had a chance to fully review Suniva’s petition to the International Trade Commission, we strongly urge the federal government to find a resolution that bolsters the competitiveness of American solar cell and panel manufacturing, which employs approximately 2,000 people in the U.S., without erecting new trade barriers,” reads a statement from SEIA CEO Abigail Hopper.
SolarWorld’s response also sounds a cautious tone. “The case of Suniva dramatically demonstrates that the U.S. solar manufacturing industry still suffers from unfair trade,” reads a statement from SolarWorld USA President Juergen Stein. “SolarWorld – as the largest U.S. crystalline-silicon solar manufacturer, with more than 40 years of U.S. manufacturing experience – will assess the case brought by Suniva but prefers that any action to be taken against unfair trade shall consider all parts of the U.S. solar value chain.”

Donnerstag, 27. April 2017

ACWA Power Will Bid to Build Saudi Arabian Solar Energy Project

ACWA Power Will Bid to Build Saudi Arabian Solar Energy Project

 
ACWA Power International will bid to build a solar energy project in Saudi Arabia, part of the kingdom’s $50 billion push to temper domestic oil use.
Riyadh-based ACWA received a request for proposals last week from Saudi Arabia’s energy ministry to develop the 300-MW solar project in Sakaka, Rajit Nanda, ACWA’s chief investment officer, said Tuesday in an interview in Dubai. It’s also considering bidding for other solar projects in Oman, Jordan and the United Arab Emirates, he said. Saudi Arabia kicked off its renewables push in January announcing plans for the solar plant and a 400-MW wind plant.
Saudi Arabia plans to develop almost 10 GW of renewable energy by 2023, requiring investment of $30 billion to $50 billion, Energy Minister Khalid Al-Falih said in January. Middle Eastern countries also including the United Arab Emirates, Jordan and Morocco are developing wind and solar power plants to either curb their fuel imports or conserve more valuable oil that could be exported instead of used domestically.
Bids for the solar project are due Sept. 11, and an award may be announced as early as November to start the contract in January, Nanda said. ACWA hasn’t decided whether it will bid on its own or with partners, he said. Tenders for the wind project are expected to be issued next month, he said.
ACWA is seeking to build a 200-MW solar plant for the U.A.E.’s Dubai Electricity & Water Authority, using concentrated solar power, Nanda said. Bids are due in June, he said. ACWA is also considering bidding for other solar projects in Oman and Jordan, he said.
Oman is expected to tender for 200 MW of power in the third quarter, and Jordan may seek bids this year for 200 MW of solar PV generation including battery storage, according to Nanda. The Jordan project also includes 100 MW of wind power, he said.
©2017 Bloomberg News

C&I Will Be Fastest Growth Sectors for Energy Storage, Leclanché Exec Says

C&I Will Be Fastest Growth Sectors for Energy Storage, Leclanché Exec Says

 
The fastest growth in energy storage is going to be in the commercial and industrial sectors, which are using storage applications innovatively to better manage renewables integration and energy efficiency, according to Anil Srivasta, CEO of Swiss energy storage solution provider Leclanché.
Addressing the plenary session at the Bloomberg 2017 Future of Energy Global Summit in New York on April 24, Srivasta added that the industry is seeing “totally new thinking toward the financing of energy storage projects by investors who are now looking at storage as a new asset class offering multiple revenue streams with large terminal value,” according to a press statement.
Leclanché said that Srivastava's remarks summarized an expert panel's findings on financing and investment models for grid energy storage systems. Panel moderator Yayoi Sekine, senior energy storage analyst, Bloomberg New Energy Finance, set the scene for the panel discussion by providing an overview of the energy storage sector outlining its rapid growth in a two-year period where global storage projects increased by more than 200 percent from 244 MW of storage projects commissioned in 2014 to 790 MW in 2016. She noted, however, that the number of third-party financed projects as opposed to owner-financed projects was relatively low during this period, with most following traditional financing structures, Leclanché said.
The company said that the panel concluded that energy storage has changed the accepted equations in the institutional structure of the power industry and has begun to provide meaningful solutions to major customers whose actions will have major impact on the energy establishment going forward.  

GWEC Annual Wind Power Update, Short Term Forecast More than 800 GW Globally by 2021

GWEC Annual Wind Power Update, Short Term Forecast More than 800 GW Globally by 2021

 
We have just released our Global Wind Report — Annual Market Update at Windergy in Delhi, detailing how in 2016, more than 54 GW of clean renewable wind power was installed across the global market, which now comprises more than 90 countries, including nine with more than 10,000 MW installed, and 29 which have now passed the 1,000-MW mark.
Cumulative capacity grew by 12.6 percent to reach a total of 486.8 GW. Wind power penetration levels continue to increase, led by Denmark pushing 40 percent, followed by Uruguay, Portugal and Ireland with well over 20 percent, Spain and Cyprus around 20 percent, Germany at 16 percent; and the big markets of China, the U.S. and Canada get 4, 5.5, and 6 percent of their power from wind, respectively.
Looking at our rolling five-year forecast, we see just under 60 GW installed globally in 2017, a more or less flat 2018 and then growth again out through the end of the decade to bring total installations up to just over 800 GW by the end of 2021, with the annual market rising to 75 GW in that year.
Global growth will continue to be driven by Asian markets. While we expect the Chinese market to increase a bit in 2017 due to the imminent feed-in-tariff reduction (and a spurt in offshore), it is unlikely to repeat its 2015 record of more than 30 GW, at least in the medium term.
2017 is likely to be another strong year for India. Elsewhere in Asia, Japan and Korea will continue to grow slowly, but we’re looking at increasing strength in the market in Pakistan, an impending surge in the Philippines, a new offshore market in Taiwan, and the ‘next big thing’ in Vietnam, pending critical regulatory changes, which are expected during the course of this year. Overall, we expect the Asian market to add 154 GW in the next five years, for a total of 357 GW by the end of 2021.

We expect Europe to proceed in line with its 2020 targets, and the evaluation of the Commission’s proposals for the post 2020 renewables regime, along with a strengthening Euro-zone economy, give rise to cautious optimism. We expect Europe to install about 73 GW of new wind power in the period out to 2021.
Offshore installations are expected to be up again in 2017, as well as in subsequent years, with much greater growth after 2020 given 2016’s (and 2017’s) dramatic price reductions. A number of countries have announced they are considering accelerating their offshore programs in light of the price points which have been reached in the past year.
North America as a whole looks pretty solid. After the deal struck at the end of 2015 for the extension and phase out of the production tax credit, the U.S. wind industry entered its longest ever period of policy stability and the 2016 market numbers bear this out. The results of the 2016 elections initially caused concern, but continued support at the state level, wind power’s increasingly competitive pricing and the more than 100,000 jobs (and growing) in the sector all bode well for a strong U.S. market for the next several years.
While the Canadian market is off its peak installation period of 1-1.5 GW/year from 2011-2015, we expect stable markets of .7-1 GW going forward. Mexico should have its first year installing more than 1,000 MW in 2017, in line with the new energy reform and government targets. Overall, we expect 61.5 GW to be installed in the North American region over the next five years.
The cancellation of all auctions in Brazil in 2016 due to the political and economic crisis is the dark spot in an otherwise bright picture for Latin America as a whole. Brazil’s market was down to just over 2 GW and although installations are expected to remain at least at that level through 2017, unless there are new auctions then the country’s newly established supply chain will be in trouble.
Elsewhere, we have a vibrant new market in Argentina, a dramatically strengthened Chilean market, the end of the big build-out in Uruguay and continued growth in Peru. The small markets in Central America will continue to make a contribution, and new climate and energy targets in the CARICOM countries mean that there will be significant activity there, although small in absolute terms. Overall, we expect just under 25 GW of new installations in the region in the period out to 2021.
After a relatively quiet 2016, we expect the Africa and Middle East region to start growing again this year. In South Africa, we hope the standoff with ESKOM will break, unleashing an enormous backlog of projects, and the government’s new Integrated Resource Plan, if it becomes policy, will facilitate this key African market’s reaching its potential.
Elsewhere in the region, Kenya’s 310-MW Lake Turkana project is now ready for commissioning, and we expect the initial buildout from last year’s auction in Morocco to begin this year, and carry on through 2020. There is also a pipeline of projects in Ethiopia; and we hope that the bottlenecks will be removed in Egypt so that country can begin to fulfill its potential as well as government targets. Overall, we expect just over 12 GW to be installed in the Africa and Middle East region over the coming five years out to 2021.
After a very quiet 2016 where the only installations in the Pacific were 140 MW in Australia, we expect that the settlement of the Renewable Energy Target issue will drive substantial new growth in Australia. Increased investment has led to a pipeline of more than 1,500 MW of new wind projects either under construction or with construction expected to begin this year.
We don’t see much activity in the rest of the region in the near future, and Australia will be the main market driver leading to the installations of about 4.7 GW in the Pacific region in the period out to 2021.
This is how we see it as of late-April 2017. No doubt we will have both positive and negative surprises (there always are), but we have a lot of confidence in the wind power market going forward, as the technology continues to improve, prices continue to come down and the call for clean, renewable power to reduce emissions, clean our air and create new jobs and new industries only gets stronger with each passing year.
See more details in our freshly released Global Wind Market Report
Lead image credit: Jason Bickley

Where, and When, Will California Get Offshore Wind?

Where, and When, Will California Get Offshore Wind?

 
Under California’s current trajectory, the state’s first offshore wind farm could be completed in waters near Morro Bay and begin sending power to the grid by 2025, according to Karen Douglas, Commissioner, California Energy Commission.
Those are Douglas’s best guesses, based on progress of an intergovernmental task force on renewable energy established last year by Gov. Jerry Brown. Speaking during an April 12 webinar on the U.S. offshore wind road map presented by Wind Energy Update, Douglas said that the task force met once last October, and will meet again in July with a goal of identifying an offshore area that could be the focus of a call for information and nominations by the U.S. Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM).
Much of the work by the task force currently is focused on a multi-phased process to collect data to inform planning efforts for that call area, Douglas said.
While the task force is collecting data along the whole coast of California, Douglas said that special emphasis has been placed on an area between Morro Bay and south towards Santa Barbara. (See Figure 1.)

Figure 1. Offshore Data Collection Area off the coast of California. Source: California Energy Commission
“There are very good resources in the far north part of the state and heading up into Oregon and beyond,” she said. “Those resources are very difficult to get to market, and so the developer interest that we have seen has focused in the south-central part of the state coastline.”
The call area may or may not include an area that was identified in a January 2016 unsolicited lease request submitted to BOEM by Trident Winds.
Trident said in its application that it has initiated development of a wind farm off the coast of Pt. Estero, Calif., with a grid connection in Morro Bay. The project has an initial nameplate capacity of 750 MW, and could be expanded to 1 GW at a later date, according to the application.
Douglas said it is not known exactly when BOEM would move forward with a call for information and nominations based on the area the task force recommends at the July meeting, but she expects that it would be not long after that meeting.
She added that, should the industry be able “to bring forward reasonably [cost]-competitive proposals, the industry is still looking at a “long time horizon” for development and permitting.
“If BOEM were to issue a call for nominations in late summer or early fall and somebody were to apply and want one of those areas and go through the entire BOEM process, including being granted a lease…realistically that kind of project would not start generating electricity for the grid until somewhere close to 2025 or after,” Douglas said.


Lead image credit: BOEM

Krannich Solar kooperiert mit BYD

Krannich Solar kooperiert mit BYD

Die einzelnen Batteriemodule der neuen Hochvoltbatterie von BYD können ohne zusätzliche Kabel direkt ineinander gesteckt werden.
Krannich Solar und BYD haben einen Kooperationsvertrag geschlossen. Der deutsche Photovoltaik-Großhändler werde künftig auch die stationären Speichersysteme des chinesischen Herstellers vertreiben, teilte Krannich Solar am Dienstagabend mit. Das AC-gekoppelte System B-BOX sei flexibel konfigurierbar und kann in 2,5 oder 12,8 Kilowattstunden-Schritten ausgebaut werden. Das Speichersystem bestehe aus einer Lithium-Eisenphosphat Batterieeinheit mit Batteriemanagementsystem. Dieses Niedrigvolt-Speichersystem biete Krannich Solar ab sofort mit Batterie-Wechselrichtern von SMA und SolaX Power an.
Auch den im Februar angekündigten neuen Holvoltspeicher B-Box H des chinesischen Herstellers werde der Photovoltaik-Großhändler in sein Portfolio aufnehmen. „Im Gegensatz zur Tesla-Batterie, bei der die hohe Batterie¬spannung über einen Hochsetzsteller erzeugt wird, handelt es sich bei dem neuen Produkt um ein echtes Hochvoltsystem bei dem die hohe Spannung durch eine Reihenschaltung mehrerer Batterie¬module zustande kommt“, wie es bei Krannich Solar weiter hieß. Die Speichersysteme von BYD eigneten sich daher sowohl für private als auch gewerbliche Photovoltaik-Anlagen.
Bei der Vorstellung seines neuen Hochvoltspeichers hatte der chinesische Hersteller angekündigt, dass er einen globalen Marktanteil bei Heim- und kleinen Gewerbespeichern von 20 Prozent in diesem Jahr erreichen wolle. 2016 hatte das Unternehmen nach Aussagen von Julia Chen, Sales Director of BYD Batteries, global rund 1000 Speichersysteme verkauft.

RWE setzt für Netzstabilität auf Hoppecke Hybrid-Großspeicher

RWE setzt für Netzstabilität auf Hoppecke Hybrid-Großspeicher

Hybrid-Großspeicher von Hoppecke
RWE Supply & Trading arbeitet ab sofort mit dem Speicherhersteller Hoppecke zusammen. Im Juli solle der Hybrid-Großspeicher sun | systemizer, der derzeit neben dem Werksgelände in Brilon-Hoppecke gebaut werde, ans Netz gehen und in Betrieb genommen werden, teilten der deutsche Speicheranbieter am Mittwoch mit. Das System mit 1,6 Megawattstunden solle dann genutzt, um Primärregelenergie zu liefern sowie für Peak Shaving im Mittelspannungsnetz. Gerade in diesen Bereichen sehe RWE aufgrund der steigenden Einspeisung erneuerbarer Energien in der Zusammenarbeit mit Netzbetreibern viele Einsatzmöglichkeiten.
Für den Hoppecke Großspeicher habe sich der Energiekonzern wegen der innovativen Hybrid-Technologie entschieden, bei der „die Vorteile einer ausgereiften Bleibatterie mit denen der modernen Lithium-Ionen-Technologie kombiniert“ würden. Die Energiespeicherleistung aus dem System werde künftig von RWE Supply & Trading vermarktet. Beide Unternehmen könnten sich bei erfolgreicher Zusammenarbeit, die Ausweitung der Kooperation vorstellen, hieß es weiter.
Im März hatte Hoppecke mit dem Bau seines ersten Hochleistungsspeichers mit Hybrid-Technologie in Brilon begonnen. Im Referenzprojekt werden etwa 1.1 Megawattstunden nutzbarer Energieinhalt mit Bleibatterien und 500 Kilowattstunden mit Lithium-Batterien erreicht, wie es damals hieß.
Screenshot: pv magazineIn einem Video-Interview mit pv magazine während der Energy Storage Europe sprachen Michael Entrup und Frederik Süllwald, Batterieexperten von Hoppecke, über die Vorteile der Kombination von Blei- und Lihitum-Batterien und weitere Themen.

Fraunhofer-Wissenschaftler erhält Innovationspreis für PID-Testverfahren

Fraunhofer-Wissenschaftler erhält Innovationspreis für PID-Testverfahren

fraunhofer_PID_PIDcon
Volker Naumann vom Fraunhofer-Center für Silizium-Photovoltaik (CSP) erhielt den DIN-Innovationspreis für die Entwicklung eines Prüfverfahrens zur Ermittlung eines Defekts in Silizium-Solarzellen. Der mit 3000 Euro dotierte Preis wurde dem Wissenschaftler für sein Prüfgerät „PIDcon“ am Dienstag auf der Hannover Messe überreicht, wie das Forschungsinstitut berichtete.
Wenn Photovoltaik-Module mit kristallinen Siliziumsolarzellen hohen Systemspannungen ausgesetzt sind und in feuchter Umgebung betrieben werden, können Leistungseinbußen auftreten. Dies wird potenzial-induzierte Degradation (PID) genannt und kann bis zum kompletten Ausfall der betroffenen Module führen. Fraunhofer CSP zufolge ist es Neumann und seinem Team nun gelungen, die physikalischen Grundlagen der PID aufzuklären und diesen Prozess in ein Modell zu überführen.
Untersuchungen auf der Mikrostrukturebene hätten gezeigt, dass Kristalldefekte im Silizium Kurzschlüsse erzeugten und diese für PID verantwortlich seien. Diese als Stapelfehler bezeichneten Kristalldefekte haben nur eine Länge von wenigen Mikrometern und eine Dicke von gerade einmal einer Atomlage, wie das Forschungsinstitut weiter mitteilt. Die Kurzschlüsse würden dann durch das Eindringen von Natriumatomen in das Silizium der Photovoltaik-Zelle entstehen.
Aufbauend auf diesen Erkenntnissen sei am Fraunhofer CSP gemeinsam mit der Firma Freiberg Instruments ein Testgerät entwickelt worden, das die Anfälligkeit von Solarzellen für diesen Effekt misst. Mit Hilfe von „PIDcon“ sei nun erstmals ein Teststandard nach DIN (SPEC 91348) für die PID-Tests an Silizium-Solarzellen definiert, ohne das die Solarmodule in großen Klimakammern getestet werden müssten. Stattdessen sei es nun möglich, PID-Test an einzelne, unverkapselte Solarzellen schnell sowie ohne großen Material-, Energie- und Arbeitsaufwand durchzuführen. „PIDcon“ werde bereits seit 2014 kommerziell angeboten.

A stronergy feiert zehn Jahre Modulproduktion in Frankfurt/Oder

Astronergy feiert zehn Jahre Modulproduktion in Frankfurt/Oder

Das Werk von Astronergy in Frankfurt/Oder
Seit zehn Jahren werden in dem Werk in der ostdeutschen Grenzstadt Frankfurt/Oder Solarmodule produziert. Module mit mehr als 1500 Megawatt seien seither gefertigt worden, wie Astronergy Solarmodule am Mittwoch mitteilte.
Im Mai 2007 sei das Werk, damals noch von dem Photovoltaik-Hersteller Conergy, in Betrieb genommen worden. Vor 3,5 Jahren hatte dann der zum chinesischen Chint-Konzern gehörende Hersteller Astronergy die Fabrik übernommen. Seither seien 2,4 Millionen Solarmodule mit einer Gesamtleistung von 636 Megawatt hergestellt worden. Mit dieser Anzahl könnte man allein in Deutschland knapp 1,4 Milliarden Kilowattstunden Solarstrom für mehr als 350.000 Vier-Personen-Haushalte produzieren, so der Photovoltaik-Hersteller. Die Module seien in ganz Europa, aber auch in Südostasien und in Australien installiert worden.
Astronergy habe nach der Übernahme mehr als fünf Millionen Euro in die Modernisierung der Produktionsstätte und Anschaffung von neuem Equipment investiert. Ziel sei es, die Produktionsmenge an Modulen pro Linie bei gleicher Qualität weiter zu erhöhen und die Kosten zu senken. Daher wird auch gerade eine der fünf Linien modernisiert, während die anderen vier noch folgen sollen, wie die Sprecherin von Astronergy, Caroline Post, auf Anfrage von pv magazine mitteilte.
Trotz der Übernahme durch Astronergy werde ein Teil der knapp 300 Mitarbeiter in wenigen Wochen ebenfalls ihre zehnjährige Firmenzugehörigkeit feiern können. Für Paul Ji, seit Jahresbeginn neuer Geschäftsführer der Astronergy Solarmodule GmbH, seien diese der Garant für den wirtschaftlichen Erfolg des Werkes.

Polarstern realisiert Photovoltaik-Mieterstromprojekt mit Gewerbespeicher

Polarstern realisiert Photovoltaik-Mieterstromprojekt mit Gewerbespeicher

Polarstern_Mieterstrom_Photovoltaik_Gewerbespeicher_Muenchen_Deutschland_2017
Die Bundesregierung hat am Mittwoch eine Förderung für Photovoltaik-Mieterstrom auf den Weg gebracht. Der Ökoenergieversorger Polarstern ist bereits einen Schritt weiter und kündigte nun die Installation eines Gewerbespeichers im Zusammenhang mit einem Photovoltaik-Mieterstromprojekt in München an. Auf dem Gelände der alten Prinz-Eugen-Kaserne in Bogenhausen baue das Architekturbüro NEST ein neues Stadtquartier. Insgesamt sollen in der Anlage 55 Mietwohnungen mit einem bis vier Zimmern entstehen, teilte Polarstern am Montag mit.
Zu den Gebäuden, die dem KfW-Effizienzhaus 40 Plus Standard entsprechen sollen, sei nun auch die Installation eines Gewerbespeichers mit 79 Kilowattstunden geplant. Der Strom solle dabei zum großen Teil von einer Photovoltaik-Dachanlage mit 79 Kilowatt Leistung kommen. Mit der Installation des Gewerbespeichers werde die Eigenverbrauchsquote bei mehr als 88 Prozent und die Autarkiequote bei 40 Prozent liegen, so Polarstern weiter. Das bedeute für die Mieter nach aktuellem Stand rund 15 Prozent niedrigere Stromkosten verglichen zum örtlichen Grundversorgertarif. Der auf dem Dach erzeugte Solarstrom solle zudem für das Aufladen von Elektroautos genutzt werden können.

In der Vergangenheit sind in Deutschland vermehrt Photovoltaik-Mieterstrommodelle verwirklicht worden. Mit dem neuen Gesetz will die Bundesregierung diese Projekte wirtschaftlicher attraktiver machen und den Markt anregen. Photovoltaik-Mieterstrommodelle mit Speichersystemen sind bislang allerdings eine Seltenheit. „Das Delta zwischen selbst erzeugtem und genutztem Strom und Strom aus dem öffentlichen Netz ist einfach zu gering“, sagt Florian Henle, Geschäftsführer des Ökoenergieversorgers Polarstern. Daher gebe es bei Gewerbespeichern in Mehrparteiengebäuden nur eine geringe Zusatzrendite. „Das ändert sich mit der geplanten Direktförderung von Mieterstrom und dem steigenden Interesse an KfW-40-Plus-Gebäuden, für die ein Speicher Voraussetzung ist“, so Henle weiter. Nicht zuletzt wegen der sinkenden Speicherpreise gehe er von einer wachsenden Nachfrage für diese Modelle aus.
Als größte Herausforderung bei der Realisierung von solchen Photovoltaik-Mieterstrommodellen nennt NEST die Installation des Gewerbespeichers, der mehrere Tonnen wiegt und mehr als zwei Meter hoch ist. „Den bekommt man kaum durch eine normale Türe durch“, erklärt Michael Joachim vom Architekturbüro. Ein kleinerer Speicher sei dennoch keine Option gewesen, da die KfW-40 Plus-Förderkriterien hohe Speicherkapazitäten erforderten. „Letztlich haben wir uns für einen modularen Speicher entschieden, der sich in Teilen transportieren lässt“, so Joachim weiter. Die Architekten wollten damit vermeiden, dass im Reparaturfall oder beim finalen Ausbau des Speichers am Ende seiner Lebenszeit, Wände eingerissen werden müssten.
Polarstern verweist darauf, dass es gerade bei der Planung von Energiekonzepten mit Mieterstrom und Speichersystemen in Neubauten wichtig sei, dass alle Beteiligten frühzeitig eingebunden würden. Bei Bestandsgebäuden sei hingegen meist ein Speichersystem empfehlenswert, das außerhalb des Hauses installiert werden könne. Dies reduziere den Installationsaufwand erheblich, so Henle.