Gesamtzahl der Seitenaufrufe

Follower

Dienstag, 22. August 2017

New energy storage incentive program in Lombardia/Italy

New energy storage incentive program in Lombardia/Italy

8/21/17, 11:00 AM -
The Italian region of Lombardia launched a new incentive scheme for solar energy storage. Similar as in Germany it provides substantial rebates for purchasing and installing a system.
Varta Storage expects expanding business in Italy due to the new incentive program for energy storage in Lombardia.
Varta Storage expects expanding business in Italy due to the new incentive program for energy storage in Lombardia.
The program has a budget of €4 million and provides rebates of up to €3,000 that may cover up to 50% of the costs for buying and installing the energy storage system. Only energy storage projects combined with PV installations with a capacity of up to 20 kW will have access to the scheme.
Applications will be accepted starting September. The systems have to be connected according to the norm, CEI 0-21.The region of Lombardia had implemented a similar scheme in 2016. Italy has presently no national incentive scheme for solar energy storage.

Rising demand expected

“I can see parallels with Germany here, where the government subsidizes the purchase of a solar battery with up to 33% of the investment costs. The demand will rise in the future as a result”, Gordon Clements, General Managers of Varta Storage told pv Europe. “I expect other regions particularly in the north of Italy will follow suit as this is where the highest purchasing power lies”, he added.
Companies like Hanwha Q Cells see energy storage as driver for the PV market in Italy. (HCN)

Ukrainian PV market speeds up – Fronius expands service

Ukrainian PV market speeds up – Fronius expands service

8/18/17, 11:48 AM -
Due to a growing demand Fronius expands its presence in the Ukraine. Benjamin Fischer, Area Sales Manager is reporting good business. He expects an energy storage market to develop in the medium term.
PV installation with Fronius inverters in Kalynivka, Vinnitsa region of Ukraine.
PV installation with Fronius inverters in Kalynivka, Vinnitsa region of Ukraine.

pv Europe: In the first half of this year, the PV market in Ukraine grew by a remarkable 23 percent. The installed capacity increased by 132 MW to 705 MW. How is your business going?

Benjamin Fischer: It has developed very well. We will certainly achieve our target of 100 MW this year. We are currently building a 50 MW project and a whole range of others. We have recently adapted our Galmo Galvo, Primo, Symo and Eco inverters in a setup especially for the Ukrainian market. They are already preconfigured, including the overvoltage and undervoltage protection limit. The installer can easily select the appropriate configuration. We have translated the corresponding documents in Cyrillic. We also hired a new technical consultant in July. A capable young man who is now working in our Ukrainian branch. He speaks Ukrainian as a mother tongue, fluent in English and organizes and holds our local training courses and seminars. This is a very important step for us.

How many employees do you have on site?

We have in our branch in Kievskaya, 20 kilometers south-east of Kiev a total of over 50-60 people in our welding department. The new colleague is now specifically responsible for our Business Unit Solar Energy.. From mid-September, we will also set up a spare parts and exchange warehouse for the solar inverters, where our partners can get the components directly without complex import formalities. Fastest service guaranteed.

Are import regulations still a bureaucratic obstacle to market access?

Yes, this is still a certain obstacle, but there is also progress. The visa requirements were made easier, which made it easier for our Ukrainian technical consultant to take part in training courses at our headquarters in Wels.
Benjamin Fischer, Area Sales Manager at Fronius.
How many installers and partners do you cooperate with in the Ukraine?
We currently have three qualified sales partners and ten Fronius service partners. We offer four trainings and online webinars per year to potential customers and interested parties, which our new Ukrainian colleague can now hold in the language of the country. This is enormously important because not all installers speak good English, since there is already a certain language barrier. In October, we will be offering the next training, right after the SEF-2017 KYIF, 9th Sustainable Energy Forum and Exhibition of Eastern Europe, October 9-11. There we are also strongly represented with a separate stand as a kilowatt sponsor.

What is the demand for training?

We are almost always busy.
Fronius service partner training in the Ukraine.

How did the various markets in the Ukraine develop further, is the residential market also growing strongly?

Yes, it has continued to develop, but we have a stronger focus on larger MW projects.

How much is the feed-in tariff?

The FITs for PV farms are listed in period 2017-2019: Ground mounted commercial, € 0.1502 kWh; Facade-mounted commercial, € 0.1637 kWh, residential € 0.1809 kWh. The difference between residential and commercial PV plants are: The payment to residential PV plant is made by the difference between exported and imported electrical energy to the grid. The less you get, the more you get. Commercial PV plants which work as companies, for example LLCs, pay profit tax which is 18%., But the profit can be minimized. We do not expect any major changes in the foreseeable future. The regulatory framework is quite stable, we are very satisfied and very confident about our further business development in Ukraine.

Has an energy storage market already developed?

Currently, the energy storage systems are still too expensive for the Ukrainian market. But there are some empires that want that, also for prestige reasons and who can afford it. In addition, there are always power failures. I expect the development of an energy storage market in the medium term and we want to offer solutions for this with our partner Victron and Solarwatt, whether for the complete off-grid operation, short-term storage or emergency power systems.
Interviewed by Hans-Christoph Neidlein

Argentina Eyes Slower Renewable Growth as Infrastructure Lags

Argentina Eyes Slower Renewable Growth as Infrastructure Lags

argentina
Argentina’s next renewable power auction will be half the size of last year’s because of an infrastructure bottleneck slowing down the ability to add capacity.
The government will auction 1.2 GW of renewable power, led by wind and solar projects, and doesn’t need much more capacity for now, Energy Minister Juan Jose Aranguren said. Argentina has plans to also award contracts for eight new transmission lines projects at the end of the year to follow the clean power expansion. A gigawatt can power at least 750,000 homes in the U.S.
“We don’t need to auction all renewable capacity now,” Aranguren said in an interview with Bloomberg Television’s Alix Steel last week. “We’ll have, at the same time, transmission line auctions and solve the bottlenecks. Moreover, if we auction 10 GW today I have to marry that with price. And the technology prices will improve. ´´
The renewable energy auction is scheduled for Nov. 29 and could drive about $2 billion in investments, according to Juan Bosch, president of energy trading company SAESA. The two previous rounds of an auction program designed to promote renewables awarded 2.4 GW of new capacity, with total commitments reaching about $4 billion.
Argentina faces limited transmission infrastructure that reaches areas with good wind and solar sources. The country will need to add 5,000 kilometers (3,100 miles) of transmission lines in the next three years to keep up with the expanding capacity.
Still Risky
“Argentina has higher prices for renewables, when you compare to other Latin American countries,” said Ana Verena Lima, a Bloomberg New Energy Finance analyst in Sao Paulo. “That is because the country is still seen as a risky place and investors demand higher returns to invest on it.”
Auction details:
Wind: Maximum contract $56.25/MWh, below average of $59/MWh in the first round last year
  • Solar: Maximum contract 57.04/MWh, below average of $60/MWh in the first round last year
  • 20-year contracts to sell power from planned power projects, with facility required ready two years after auction 
  • Deadline to submit proposals is Oct 19.
  • Auction set for November
  • Will seek 550 MW of wind; 450 MW solar; 100 MW of biomass; 50 MW of small hydropower; 35 MW of biogas; and 15 MW from landfill biogas.
The government created a loan-guarantee mechanism that cuts project risk. The government has also arranged rate subsidies and equity contributions, and an additional guarantee from the World Bank.
More than 60 percent of Argentina’s energy comes from fossil fuels, according to Bloomberg New Energy Finance. The country set a goal of boosting clean energy consumption to 8 percent by the end of 2017, from 1 percent now, and 20 percent by 2025.
“We’ll see a lot of bids,” said Bosch. “There are many developed projects ready to go to the auction, from big national and international players.”
©2017 Bloomberg News
— With assistance by Alix Steel, and Kelly Belknap

Mexico City Company Turns Prickly Pear Cactus Waste Into Energy

Mexico City Company Turns Prickly Pear Cactus Waste Into Energy

waste
A startup called Energy and Environmental Sustainability is taking cactus waste from the Milpa Alta neighborhood of the capital and turning it into biogas…
The pilot project was launched in May at Milpa Alta's sprawling cactus market.
The far-flung neighborhood is a splash of green amid the smog and concrete of this Latin American mega-city, thanks in part to its more than 2,800 hectares (some 7,000 acres) of fields of prickly pear cactus, known in Spanish as "nopal."
Farmers in straw sombreros trickle into these fields every morning at dawn to work the long rows of cactus that flow from the lower flanks of the dormant Teuhtli volcano.
The area produces 200,000 tons a year of prickly pear cactus — up to 10 tons of which ends up as waste on the floor of the cactus market each day.
A local green energy start-up called Energy and Environmental Sustainability — Suema, by its Spanish acronym — got the idea to develop a biogas generator to turn that waste into energy.
They decided to build it right at the source: the bustling cactus market, where hundreds of workers start each day by cleaning up the waste left from the day before.

Investor Group to Buy Calpine for $5.6 Billion

Investor Group to Buy Calpine for $5.6 Billion

calpine
Calpine Corp. on Friday said that a consortium of investors will buy the geothermal electricity supplier for $5.6 billion.
Energy Capital Partners along with a consortium of investors led by Access Industries and Canada Pension Plan Investment Board have agreed to pay $15.25 per share in cash for the company.
According to Calpine, it owns 13 geothermal facilities in California with a total generating capacity of 725 MW.
“We are very pleased to announce this proposed transaction and are confident it is in the best interests of our shareholders and stakeholders,” Frank Cassidy, chairman of Calpine’s Board of Directors, said in a statement. “This transaction is the result of an exhaustive review of strategic alternatives undertaken by our Board, with the assistance of outside advisors, to maximize shareholder value and unlock the company’s intrinsic value, while eliminating execution risk. We are confident that this is the best outcome of that review and look forward to shareholder approval.”
Calpine will maintain its corporate headquarters in Houston, with the current management team expected to remain in place. The company has 45 days to evaluate competitive offers.
Tyler Reeder, a partner at Energy Capital Partners, said the company does not expect to make any changes to the way Calpine operates its business.
Thad Hill, president and CEO of Calpine said: “With ECP, Calpine will be able to operate as it always has – executing on our strategic objectives of providing safe and reliable power and serving our retail and wholesale customers with differentiated products and services. We will also continue to strengthen our wholesale power generation footprint, while benefiting from ECP’s support, industry expertise and long-term investment horizon.”
Image credit: Rtracey | Public domain | Wikimedia

Taming Soft Costs for Solar PV

Taming Soft Costs for Solar PV

solar
When evaluating power purchase agreement (PPA) opportunities for solar PV projects, soft costs often don’t get enough consideration. For most financiers, there’s a general budget for each category of soft costs and that number doesn’t get reevaluated despite the nuances of a project. Soft costs include the following:
  • Legal fees — to review documents like PPAs; engineering, procurement and construction services; and site leases
  • Accounting fees — to review the eligibility of system costs per IRS guidelines
  • Real Estate — depending on the type of project being built, a number of different fees can come into play to assure the financier that the off taker is the legal owner of the site and that the project being built does not intrude on any existing encumbrances
  • Independent engineering — For every project, an independent engineer needs to evaluate the system being built to confirm that it meets local and national building codes, that the system is built to specification, and that the system will meet the production estimates that are built into the financial modeling
For larger projects (utility scale), soft costs are impactful, but relatively, to a lesser extent. For smaller projects in the commercial and industrial (C&I) market, soft costs can be very impactful, and can actually derail many projects financially.
If a project incurs $100,000 in soft costs for a 5-MW project that can be built for $1.75/watt, (5 MW x $1.75 = $8.75 million in total build costs), then as a percentage, soft costs equate to a little more than 1 percent of the overall project cost ($100,000/$8.75M = 1.1 percent).
For a 200-kW system with a $2.25/watt build cost (200 kW x $2.25 = $450,000), and $50,000 of soft costs, 11 percent is added to the overall project cost; a substantial amount for a project that may be difficult to finance in the first place.
If small projects have trouble creating economies of scale with regards to soft costs, it’s fair to ponder, how do residential projects ever get financed then? The simple answer is standardization. Companies like Vivint, Sunrun, and Solar City use the same contracts and don’t expose themselves to lengthy negotiations with several red-lines being lobbed back-and-forth. It’s pretty much a take it or leave it proposition. By utilizing common documentation, one of the main drivers of soft costs, namely legal support, is effectively negated.
So, how can we achieve similar soft cost reductions and economies of scale for the small C&I market? Another way of stating that would be, “How can we make small and medium sized C&I look more like the residential market?” This is the task that we have set for ourselves. Over several years and by using our online project pricing, management software, and standardization of processes and documentation, we have been able to reduce costs related to legal, accounting, independent engineering and asset management.
This has allowed us to reduce our minimum project size to 100 kW, with a focus of an even lower minimum over time. By taming the soft cost beast, we provide financing to the sorely neglected small to medium size C&I market.
This article was originally published by Sustainable Capital Finance and was republished with permission.

Home Depot to Lease 50 Store Rooftops for Solar Power

Home Depot to Lease 50 Store Rooftops for Solar Power

home depot
The Home Depot last week said that it will use power purchase agreements to lease rooftop space for 50 of its stores.
The company is working with Tesla and GE subsidiary Current on the project.
Store locations are in California, Connecticut, Maryland, New Jersey, New York and Washington, D.C.
According to Home Depot, the project will reduce grid electricity demand by about 35 percent annually at each Home Depot store.
The solar project is part of the company’s efforts to use 135 MW of alternative and renewable energy by 2020.
Home Depot also has invested in solar farms in Delaware and Massachusetts; fuel cells at about 170 stores; and wind farms in Texas and Mexico.

Rising Chinese Solar Panel Prices May Put Indian Projects At Risk

Rising Chinese Solar Panel Prices May Put Indian Projects At Risk

solar panel
Solar power projects bid at low tariffs may be at risk as the prices of photovoltaic panels have risen amid a push in the U.S. to impose anti-dumping duty on cheaper imports from China.
Tariffs could also rise from record lows as uncertainty over costs may deter renewable energy producers from quoting low rates in future auctions.
The price of Chinese solar panels rose to 20 percent in the last six months to 35 cents per watt, Sanjeev Aggarwal, managing director and chief executive officer of Amplus Energy Solutions Pvt. Ltd, a solar rooftop project developer, told BloombergQuint.
Solar power producers that participated in auctions this year quoted lower tariffs assuming that panel prices will remain below 30 cents, Aggarwal said. “Any increase in prices is not covered under the power purchase agreements.”
Growing risks may be a setback, at least in the short term, to Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s target to install 100 GW of solar capacity by 2022 from a little over 13 GW now. That’s because about 84 percent of solar panel requirement in the country is met through imports from China, a report by renewable energy consultancy Bridge To India said. Solar panels account for more than half of a project’s total costs, according to Bloomberg New Energy Finance. Major Chinese solar panel makers include Trina Solar, Jinko Solar, Canadian Solar, JA Solar.
Power tariffs fell over the past few months to hit a record low of Rs 2.44/kWh at the auction for 500 MW of capacity at the Bhadla Solar Park in Rajasthan in May. BloombergQuint’s e-mailed queries to SBG Cleantech Pvt. Ltd. and Acme Solar Holding Ltd., which won the bid, regarding the impact of rising panel prices remained unanswered.
In Tamil Nadu, the tariff fell to Rs 3.47 a unit in reverse-auctions for 1,000 MW solar plants last month. It’s lower than Rs 4.40 a unit, the previous lowest bid in an auction conducted by the state in February.
The tariffs declined largely as power producers bet on falling prices of solar panels. And their confidence stemmed from a 26 percent decline in prices in 2016 alone.
The trend reversed after Suniva, a U.S. based solar manufacturer that has filed for bankruptcy, moved the U.S. International Trade Commission in April to impose anti-dumping duty and a global tariff on Chinese imports. Ironically, Suniva is majority owned by a Chinese company, Shunfeng.
American solar rooftop services providers started stocking up on panels fearing tariffs, pushing up the prices, Aggarwal said. China also extended its feed-in tariff regime instead of moving to an auction-based system, keeping the panel demand high. Feed-in tariffs is a mechanism for payments to anyone generating power from renewable sources and supplying to the grid. That too aided the price rise, Aggarwal said.
Panel rates have gone up by 5-6 cents to 35 cents a watt over the last few months, said Kameswara Rao, partner, PwC, who tracks the renewable energy sector. If China replaces feed-in tariffs with auctions, it will have an impact on the prices of panels as well.
Till then, what action the U.S trade commission takes on Suniva’s petition will decide the course. Indian Solar Manufacturers Association too has demanded an anti-dumping duty on imports from China, Malaysia and Taiwan, and the ministry of corporate affairs has launched an investigation, adding to uncertainty.
“If you compare with three months ago, if it’s a large volume (of imports), price impact may be 2-3 cents a watt. If it’s a smaller volume, the impact is about 5-6 cents,” said Gagan Vermani, managing director and chief executive officer of MYSUN, a solar rooftop solutions provider. Power producers that banked on lower prices to bid for projects will take a hit on profitability, he said.
Some state governments also delayed signing power purchase agreements after an auction due to worries of excess capacity, said PwC’s Rao. This will also affect the viability of projects where bidders have an exposure to panel prices, he said. “In recent times, it had become common for bidders to delay procurement in the hope of buying at lower rates.”
Uncertainty Over Solar Tariffs
Higher solar panel prices also make it difficult to predict tariffs.
"Any project is required to be built in six to nine months and there is clearly a risk of high panel prices,” said Aggarwal. If the projects go beyond that to suppose 12 months, it will be difficult to predict the international market price, he said.
“I don't think solar power producers will take additional risk. They will make safe assumptions. You will see solar power tariffs firming up,” he said.
PwC’s Rao feels a lot will depend on the Chinese feed-in tariff program. “With the current information, we expect solar tariffs in imminent bids to go up by 15-20 paise/kWh. The baseline will be higher for state-level solar bids as investors are consciously factoring in payment and curtailment risk,” he said.
©2017  Bloomberg News
Lead image credit: James MacDonald | Bloomberg

Haitis Solarbranche fordert Investitionssicherheit

Haitis Solarbranche fordert Investitionssicherheit


Auf einer internationalen Solar-Konferenz in Haitis Hauptstadt Port-au-Prince forderten die wichtigsten Photovoltaik-Unternehmer des Landes klare gesetzliche Regelungen zur Liberalisierung des haitianischen Energiemarktes sowie eine solarfreundliche Politik zur Förderung der Marktpotenziale. Die Veranstaltung wurde organisiert von den Hilfsorganisationen NPH, St. Luc Foundation und der Biohaus-Stiftung.
Nur sechs Prozent der in der Provinz lebenden Haitianer haben Zugang zur Elektrizität. Die Stromproduktion des staatlichen Energieunternehmens Électricité d’Haiti (EDH) von gerade einmal 245 Megawatt basiert zu etwa 80 Prozent auf Dieselgeneratoren. Weitere 20 Prozent des EDH-Netzes speist sich aus dem Wasserkraftwerk Péligre im Département Artibonite nördlich der Hauptstadt.
Aufgrund der kontinuierlichen Überlastung und der äußerst geringen Netzstabilität des staatlichen Versorgers verzeichnet Haiti einen wachsenden Bedarf an Solartechnik. Vor allem lokale Kleinstnetze und individuelle Versorgungstationen gewinnen zunehmend an Bedeutung. Die zwei größten Photovoltaik-Unternehmer des Landes beklagen derweil die mangelnde politische und legislative Unterstützung des haitianischen Staates sowie die schleppende Zusammenarbeit mit dem staatlichen Versorger EDH bezüglich der Einspeisung des Solarstroms in das öffentliche Netz.
„Theoretisch wurde das Staatsmonopol längst abgeschafft. Die Entscheidung wurde allerdings in einem politisch umstrittenen Prozess getroffen, so dass die Gesetzeslage und ihre konkrete Anwendung bis heute unklar sind“, meint etwa Jean-Ronel Noël, dessen 2007 in Port-au-Prince gegründetes Unternehmen Enersa Solarmodule und LED-Leuchten produziert. Mit rund 30 haitianischen Ingenieuren hat Enersa bereits 5000 Solar-Straßenlaternen sowie Photovoltaik-Anlagen in Privathaushalte, Mikronetze und Industrieanlagen installiert.
Trotz fallender Preise auf dem Photovoltaik-Markt seien die Anfangsinvestitionen für Solartechnik im Vergleich zur Dieselgeneratoren bis heute deutlich höher. Durch die unklare Gesetzlage und mangelnde staatliche Unterstützung würden potenzielle Investoren in Haiti verunsichert, so Noël. Jean-Jacques Sylvain, Geschäftsführer von Green Energy Solutions, fordert von staatlicher Seite den Zugang zum Clean Technology Fund der Weltbank (CTF; 5,8 Milliarden US-Dollar), der Privatpersonen günstige Kredite zur Aufrüstung für Nutzung von erneuerbaren Energien zur Verfügung stellt.
Nicolas Allien, Verantwortlicher für den Energiesektor im haitianischen Ministerium für Infrastruktur, Verkehr und Kommunikation, unterstrich auf der Konferenz in Port-au-Prince die Absicht der haitianischen Regierung, erneuerbare Energie sowohl zur Einspeisung in das staatliche Stromnetz als auch auf Ebene individueller Kleinstnetze zu fördern. Eine der größten Herausforderung sieht Allien in der Aufrüstung der staatlichen Infrastruktur zur Erweiterung der Einspeisungskapazitäten des Netzes. Derzeit untersuche die haitianische Regierung die Bedingungen zur Umsetzung der geplanten Steuerbefreiung auf den Import von Solartechnik, so Allien.
Erklärtes Ziel ist es, 60.000 lokale Stromnetze und 600.000 Individual-Netze mit erneuerbaren Energien zu realisieren. Bis heute nutzen 75 Prozent der nicht ans staatliche Netz angeschlossenen Haushalte Haitis Holzkohle zur Energiegewinnung, was aufgrund des großflächigen Baumrohdens eine zunehmende Bodenerosion zur Folge hat. (Cornelius Wüllenkemper)

CS Wismar zurück in der Gewinnzone

CS Wismar zurück in der Gewinnzone


Vor gut anderthalb Jahren hat die CS Wismar GmbH die Produktion von Solarmodulen in den ehemaligen Centrosolar-Werken wieder aufgenommen. Im ersten Halbjahr konnte der Photovoltaik-Hersteller nun einen gewinnträchtigen Geschäftsverlauf vermelden. „Nach gut einem Jahr haben wir bereits break even erreicht“, sagt Geschäftsführer Bernhard Weilharter im Gespräch mit pv magazine. Wie hoch Umsatz und Gewinn im ersten Halbjahr genau waren, will er nicht sagen. Weilharter verweist aber darauf, dass der Sprung in die Gewinnzone gelungen sei, obwohl erst ein Siebtel der möglichen Kapazität von 400 Megawatt in den Werken in Wismar ausgelastet gewesen sei. „Wir fahren die Produktionsmengen derzeit kontinuierlich hoch“, sagt er. Der Anteil der Glas-Glas-Fertigung liege derzeit bei 60 Prozent – Tendenz steigend. Weiteres Wachstum erwarte CS Wismar auch durch den Trend hin zu Eigenverbrauchssystemen.
Dabei hat der Photovoltaik-Hersteller in den zurückliegenden Monaten auch einiges in die Verbesserung seiner Produktion investiert. „Die Umrüstung auf 4- und 5-Busbar haben wir erfolgreich abgeschlossen. Zudem wurde die Automation im Bereich Glas-Glas weiter erhöht“, erklärt Weilharter zu den Änderungen. Zusätzlich habe CS Wismar nun die Zertifizierung nach IEC 2016 erhalten. Zugleich habe der Photovoltaik-Hersteller aufgrund der allgemeinen und verständlichen Verunsicherung am Markt eine Prüfung seiner Bankability vornehmen lassen und eine Bestätigung seiner wirtschaftlichen Stabilität sowie der hohen Qualitätsstandards erhalten, erklärt er.
Das Werk von CS Wismar verfügt zudem über einen „Low Carbon Footprint“. Diese Zertifizierung ist vor allen Dingen wichtig, um bei französischen Ausschreibungsprojekten zum Zuge zu kommen. „Wir weisen nun einen CO2-Footprint aus, welcher im internationalen Vergleich an der Spitze liegt“, erklärt der Geschäftsführer von CS Wismar weiter. Die Nachfrage aus Frankreich nach Modulen aus der Wismarer Fertigung nehme daher auch erfreulicherweise weiter zu. Auch für die zweite Jahreshälfte ist Weilharter zuversichtlich, dass CS Wismar dieses Geschäftsfeld weiter ausbauen kann.
Neben den Verbesserungen in der Produktion habe das Unternehmen sein Vertriebspartnernetzwerk in Deutschland und Frankreich in den zurückliegenden Monaten deutlich ausgebaut. „Wir decken bei mehreren Top-Großhändlern das Premium-Segment ab,“ verkündet Weilharter nicht ohne Stolz. „Aktuell bauen wir mit analoger Strategie das Vertriebsnetzwerk in Benelux auf. Den Weg exklusiv über Großhandelspartner zu agieren, werden wir konsequent fortsetzen“, kündigt Weilharter an. Allein aufgrund der neu gewonnenen Partner und Fachgroßhändler rechnet CS Wismar auch für das zweite Halbjahr mit einem steigenden Auftragseingang.
Doch in dem Wismarer Werk werden nicht nur eigene Module hergestellt: Ein Teil der Kapazitäten wird für den Geschäftsbereich OEM – also die Auftragsproduktion – genutzt. Dieser habe sich ebenfalls „sehr positiv“ entwickelt. Den Schlüssel für den Erfolg sieht Weilharter hier in den Glas-Glas-Produkten, den geringen CO2-Fußabdruck sowie Sonderanfertigungen für Repowering-Projekte. Die rasant angestiegene Nachfrage im ersten Halbjahr habe temporär zu Lieferengpässen bei einzelnen Komponenten wie Anschlussdosen oder Glas geführt, räumt Weilharter ein. Mittlerweile sei dies aber gelöst. Außerdem habe CS Wismar, zusätzlich weitere 80 Mitarbeiter im ersten Halbjahr eingestellt. Die Lieferzeiten würden derzeit nachhaltig reduziert.
Das erfolgreiche erste Halbjahr hat den Photovoltaik-Hersteller bestärkt, seine eingeschlagene Strategie konsequent fortzuführen. „Wir setzen auf Differenzierung, um damit ein nachhaltig gesundes Wachstum mit qualitativ hochwertigen Produkten zu erreichen“, so Weilharter weiter. „Wir achten darauf, dass wir beim Wachstumstempo nicht überhitzen.“ Die Qualität stehe immer im Vordergrund, weshalb die Produktionsmengen nur schrittweise, aber fortlaufend hochgefahren würden. Analog dazu werde auch die Mitarbeiterzahl steigen, wobei auch hier die Qualifizierung im Vordergrund stehe.

Photovoltaik-Dachanlagen auch ohne Ballast möglich

Photovoltaik-Dachanlagen auch ohne Ballast möglich


Das Gewicht, mit dem Flachdach-Photovoltaik-Anlagen beschwert werden müssen, konnte seit 2006 um rund zwei Drittel reduziert werden, erklärte Holger Seifert im pv magazine-Webinar „Flachdachmontage: Markt und technische Fallen“. Das liegt zum einen an der fortlaufenden aerodynamischen Optimierung, so der Teamleiter Vertrieb Deutschland von IBC Solar, dem Initiativpartner dieses Webinars. Zum anderen werden Anlagen nun teilweise in Ost-West-Ausrichtung gebaut statt in Südrichtung, was weniger Ballast erfordere. Zudem sei unter anderem durch Windkanaltests die Berechnung genauer geworden, so dass Sicherheitsmargen besser kalkuliert werden können und die Gesamtlast sinkt. Dadurch, dass die Anlagen leichter werden, können inzwischen Photovoltaik-Anlagen auf Dächern gebaut werden, wo es vor Jahren noch nicht möglich gewesen sei, so Seifert.
Um Flachdachanlagen gut zu installieren, ist es demnach wichtig, die notwendige Beschwerung genau zu berechnen. Es sei jedoch auch zu beachten, dass der Druck auf die Dachhaut die Wärmedämmung nicht schädigt. Es hängt von der Beschaffenheit der Dämmung, von der Auflagefläche des Montagesystems und vom notwendigen Ballast ab, ob bei einem Dach eine Photovoltaikanlage realisiert werden kann. Michael Fleischmann, Produktmanager Montagesysteme bei IBC Solar, empfiehlt, notfalls die Dachhaut fachgerecht aufzuschneiden und nachzusehen, welche Art von Wärmedämmung vorhanden ist und wie deren Beschaffenheit ist.
Im Webinar konnten aus Zeitgründen nicht alle Fragen der Teilnehmer beantwortet werden. Die Experten von IBC Solar haben sie schriftlich beantwortet

Antworten auf Fragen aus dem Webinar

Ballastierung

Wie hoch ist die Ballastierung pro Modul bei Ihrem System und dem vorgerechneten Beispiel an den drei Standorten?
In den Beispielen wurde die maximal auftretende Ballastierung zu Grunde gelegt und die daraus resultierende Pressung der Wärmedämmung. Es ist schwer, das Gewicht pro Modul anzugeben, aber die Werte bei dem Ost-West System liegen bei zehn bis 15 Kilogramm pro Quadratmeter auf die Generatorfläche verteilt, bei den Süd-Systemen bei etwa 20 bis 25 Kilogramm pro Quadratmeter, abhängig vom Gebäudestandort und den Gebäudedaten.
Auch bei dem Schienensystemen müssen Ränder vermutlich höher ballastiert werden als der zentrale Bereich der Anlage. Ist in Ihrer Rechnung der Druckbelastung auf die Wärmedämmung berücksichtigt, dass sie an den Rändern höher ist als der Mittelwert?
Wir berechnen immer die ungünstigste Stelle, nicht den Mittelwert.
Sie haben im Webinar ein Beispieldach aus Garmisch gezeigt. Stimmt es, dass dort aufgrund der geringen Windlast gar kein Ballast verwendet wurde, nicht einmal am Anlagenrand?
Bei einem Ost-West-System kann dies sehr gut der Fall sein. Abhängig natürlich vom Gebäudestandort und den Gebäudedaten.
Ist es bei großen Schneelasten nicht problematisch, wenn die Module wie bei Ihrem System nur am äußersten Rand befestigt sind?
Das kann durchaus problematisch sein. Deswegen eignen sich nicht alle am Markt verfügbaren Solarmodule für die Montage mit unserem System. Die Module müssen in der Installationsanleitung explizit für diese Art von Befestigung freigegeben sein. Das ist bei weitem nicht bei allen Modulen am Markt der Fall. Lässt der Modulhersteller jedoch eine solche Montage zu, spricht nichts dagegen. Übrigens, alle Module, die IBC Solar vertreibt, haben diese Zulassung. Das ist Teil unseres Systemgedankens.
Wenn sich im Nachhinein zeigt, dass die Ballastierung der Anlage nicht ausreichend war und ein Schaden eingetreten ist, haftet IBC Solar für die statische Berechnung, die von IBC Solar selber oder mit der empfohlenen Software durchgeführt wurde, oder haftet der Installateur?
Nur der Installateur kennt die Angaben zum Dach und zur Anlage. Er gibt die Daten in das Programm ein beziehungsweise wir übernehmen das für ihn. Für die Richtigkeit der Daten (zum Beispiel die Geländekategorie) ist daher der Installateur verantwortlich.

Wasserabfluss und Bautenschutzmatten

Das Montagesystem von IBC Solar nutzt eine durchgehende Grundschiene, damit der Druck auf die Wärmedämmung nicht zu hoch wird. Wie garantieren Sie bei einem System mit durchgängigen Schienen einen ausreichenden Wasserablauf?
Wir haben zwar eine durchlaufende Bodenschiene, aber liefern diese mit vorkonfektionierten und bereits an der Unterseite der Schiene in bestimmten Abständen angeklebten Bautenschutzmatten aus. Das garantiert einen ausreichenden Wasserabfluss.
Wie definieren Sie punktförmige, linienförmige und flächig aufliegende Systeme?
  • Punktförmig: kleine Auflagefläche, direkt unterhalb der Stützen mit circa 0,05 Quadratmetern
  • Linienförmig: Unterstützung der Lastverteilung auch in den Zwischenräumen der Stützen
  • Flächig aufliegend: zum Beispiel Wannen
Da unter der durchgehenden Schiene Bautenschutzmatten liegen, die nicht durchgängig sind, entspricht das am Ende doch auch einer punktuellen Belastung. Warum ist sie geringer als bei Systemen mit Standfüßen?
Wären die Bautenschutzmatten nur im Bereich der Stützen vorhanden, würde ich Ihnen zustimmen. Jedoch sind bei unserem System die Bautenschutzmatten auch in den Zwischenräumen verbaut, wodurch sich die Lasten gleichmäßig auf die gesamte Länge der durchgehenden Schiene verteilen. Ein Vergleich: Laufen Sie mit Skiern über Schnee, ist die Gefahr des Einsinkens viel geringer, als wenn Sie zu Fuß über den Schnee spazieren. Und je breiter der Ski, etwa ein Tourenski, desto besser.
Bei Systemen mit Standfüßen lässt sich die Auflagefläche durch untergelegte Wannen vergrößern. Wie groß ist dann noch der Unterschied zu Systemen mit durchgehenden Grundschienen? Oder haben diese dann noch andere Vorteile?
Die Frage ist, wie steif die untergelegten Wannen sind. Legt man nur Bautenschutzmatten mit größerer Auflagefläche darunter, hat man keinen großen Nutzen. Die Matten werden sich nach oben biegen und die Auflagefläche bleibt trotzdem „klein“. Verwendet man stabilere Materialien, bringt dies zwar einen Nutzen, aber dann schwindet der finanzielle Vorteil punktueller Systeme gegenüber Systemen mit durchlaufender Schiene. Hinzu kommt, dass man bei den Wannen auch zusätzlich den Schutz (Bautenschutzmatten) benötigt.
Eine Pfützenbildung gibt es auf fast jedem Flachdach. Wird die Schiene von IBC Solar beschädigt, wenn sie im Wasser liegt, zum Beispiel bei Frost? Wenn nein, wie verhindern Sie das?
Die Bodenschiene ist aus Aluminium hergestellt und besitzt keine Hohlkammer, wo der Frost die Schiene auffrieren könnte. Wir haben noch keine einzige Reklamation gehabt.
Warum ist eine Bautenschutzmatte zwischen Schiene und Dachhaut unabhängig davon notwendig, dass der Wasserablauf gewährleistet werden muss?
Eine Bautenschutzmatte muss verlegt werden, damit durch die Druckbelastung die Schiene nicht in die Abdichtung gedrückt wird (Kantenschutz). Bei Verwendung einer Bautenschutzmatte muss die Verträglichkeit der Stoffe berücksichtigt werden (Bautenschutzmatte zu Abdichtung). Hieraus ergibt sich bei Folien die Notwendigkeit, Bautenschutzmatten mit Alukaschierung zu verwenden. Letztendlich muss der Wasserablauf auf dem Dach gewährleistet sein (bei quer zur Ablaufrichtung verlaufenden Schienen). Es existieren einschlägige Normen und Richtlinien, was bei der Planung einer Solaranlage zu berücksichtigen ist.

Allgemeine Fragen

Ist es sinnvoll, Gewerbeanlagen als Eigenverbrauchsanlagen unter Umständen kleiner als das Dach zu planen, oder eher als Einspeiseanlagen, die man so groß wie möglich auslegt? Und warum ist das Ihrer Ansicht nach so?
Das kommt auf den Wunsch des Kunden/des Betreibers an. Wenn es um eine reine Eigenverbrauchsoptimierung geht, dann kann es sehr wohl dazu führen, dass die Photovoltaik-Anlage deutlich kleiner ausfällt, als es das Dach hergeben würde. Es ist letztendlich eine Frage des Investors/Anlagenbetreibers wieviel Photovoltaik er installieren möchte, um den Anteil der Einspeisung zu erhöhen. Ab einer anlagenspezifischen Größe wächst der Eigenbedarfsanteil nur noch minimal.
Falls das Flachdach vor Installation der Photovoltaik-Anlage saniert wird, muss es dann die Anforderungen der neuen Energieeinsparverordnung einhalten, auch wenn das Gebäude schon älter ist?
Hierzu würden wir an einen Fachmann zum Beispiel einen Energieberater verweisen.
Was muss man beachten, wenn man, um die Einstrahlung besser auszunutzen, eine gemischte Anlage mit Ost-West-Ausrichtung und Südausrichtung baut?
Das man pro Dach-Seite/Ausrichtung jeweils eigene Wechselrichter verwendet.
Wie problematisch ist die horizontale Kraft, die die Photovoltaik-Anlage auf die Dachhaut ausübt, zumindest bei starkem Wind?
Aufgeständerte Photovoltaik-Anlagen sind horizontalen Kräften ausgesetzt, welche aber sehr viel kleiner sind als die vertikalen. Bei Südaufständerungen fallen diese größer aus (bedingt durch das Windblech) als bei Ost-West-Aufständerungen. Diese müssen im Normalfall von einem Statiker überprüft werden. Falls es hier Einschränkungen beim Aufbau einer Photovoltaik-Anlage geben würde, würde IBC Solar versuchen, eine Lösung für die Belegung des Daches zu finden.
Bei langen Schienensystemen können sich hohe Horizontalkräfte aus der thermischen Ausdehnung ergeben. In welchen Abständen setzen Sie eine thermische Trennung ein und ist das nicht deutlich komplizierter als bei Systemen mit Standfüßen?
Wir planen nach jeweils 15 Modulen in vertikaler oder horizontaler Ausrichtung eine Dehnungsfuge ein. In horizontaler Richtung stehen die „neuen“ Stützen in einem gewissen Abstand auf einer parallel verlaufenden Schiene zur „alten“ Schiene. In vertikaler Richtung wird einfach die durchlaufende Schiene unterbrochen. Sinnvoll ist es sowieso, Wartungsgänge in bestimmten Abständen bei einer großflächigen Anlage anzuordnen, wobei man dies als Dehnungsfugen betrachten kann.
Wie ist mit Ihrem System eine Inspektion und Wartung der Dachhaut möglich und wie oft muss diese durchgeführt werden?
Es ist eine regelmäßige Inspektion und Wartung der Dachhaut notwendig (Abstände der Wartung nach Dachdeckerhandwerk). Bei einer Südaufständerung ist immer ein Reihenabstand vorhanden, den man zur Inspektion nutzen kann. Bei dem Ost-West-System haben wir einen circa 30 Zentimeter breiten Spalt zur Verfügung. Unsere Systeme sind zwar weitgehend wartungsfrei, wir empfehlen jedoch Inspektionen nach stärkeren Winden oder Stürmen. Ebenso muss eine elektronische Inspektion in regelmäßigen Abständen durchgeführt werden. Hierbei kann auch die Halterung überprüft werden.
Wie beeinflusst die Installation der Photovoltaik-Anlage die Gewährleistung des Daches?
Eine professionell installierte Photovoltaik-Anlage beschädigt das Dach nicht. Jedoch wird es wahrscheinlich im Schadensfall immer unterschiedliche Meinungen von Installateur und Dachdecker geben. Deshalb ist es immer sehr wichtig, vor dem Bau einer Photovoltaik-Anlage eine genaue Aufnahme des zu belegenden Daches vorzunehmen und den Bauherren auf mögliche Mängel hinzuweisen. Dies ist auch wichtig, falls es in der Zukunft zu Streitigkeiten kommen sollte.
Für welche Dacharten (Bitumen, Folie, leichte Schräge) ist Ihr System zu empfehlen und bei welchen Materialien oder Bauarten würden Sie eher abraten?
Unser System kann bis Dachneigungen von zehn Grad eingesetzt werden. Ab einer Dachneigung von drei Grad wird eine Abrutschsicherung montiert. Dies hat sich auch schon bei bestehenden Anlagen bewährt. Unsere unterschiedlichen Systeme können bei Bitumen-, Folien-, Kies- und begrünten Dächern eingesetzt werden. Auf jeden Fall ist bei bestehenden Dächern darauf zu achten, dass der Zustand der Dächer überprüft wurde. Eine Anlage soll ja über eine längere Zeit auf dem Dach verweilen.
Gibt es Einschränkungen beim Bau von Photovoltaik-Anlagen auf Flachdächern, je nachdem ob der Wasserabfluss mittig oder zum Rand hin ausgebildet ist? Welcher ist zu bevorzugen?
Die Wasserabläufe dürfen nicht überbaut werden. So gesehen ist es egal, wo sich ein Wasserablauf befindet.
Wer ist für die statische Tragfähigkeit des Daches mit Photovoltaik-Anlage verantwortlich?
Der Bauherr ist für die statische Tragfähigkeit des Daches verantwortlich. Er hat die entsprechenden Unterlagen für das Dach
Was halten Sie von Montagesystemen aus UV-beständigem und verwitterungsbeständigem Kunststoff, die direkt auf das Flachdach angebracht werden (meist geschweißt auf Platten). Hält dieses System auch Schneelasten im Süden und Wind stand?
Wir haben einige Dächer, bei denen dieses System vorher verbaut war und wir nun neue Photovoltaik-Anlagen errichten. Nach der neuen DIN 18531-1 darf die Abdichtungsschicht nicht zur lastabtragenden Befestigung von Solaranlagen, zum Beispiel adhäsive Verbindung durch Kleben oder Schweißen, genutzt werden.

Projekt „Smiles“ soll Integration von Erneuerbaren und Speichern ins Netz vorantreiben

Projekt „Smiles“ soll Integration von Erneuerbaren und Speichern ins Netz vorantreiben


Mit der Energiewende verbunden ist die zunehmende dezentrale Erzeugung. Die Speicherung von erneuerbaren Energien und ihre Integration in die Netze ist dabei entscheidend, für eine gesicherte Energieversorgung in Zukunft. Dazu ist nun das Projekt „Smiles“ (Smart Integration of Energy Storages in Local Multi Energy Systems) aufgesetzt worden. Dort soll das europaweite Know-how zur der Simulation, Optimierung und Nutzung solcher Infrastrukturen zusammengeführt werden. Koordiniert wird das Projekt vom Karlsruher Institut für Technologie (KIT). Daran beteiligt sind zudem das Austrian Institute of Technology GmbH (AIT), die Danmarks Tekniske Universitet (DTU), die Electricité de France SA (EDF), die European Energy Research Alliance (EERA AISBL) und die Vlaamse Instelling Voor Technologisch Onderzoek N.V. (VITO).
„Es gibt heute nicht mehr die eine Energiequelle, die alles liefert“, erklärt Isabelle Südmeyer, „Smiles“-Koordinatorin am KIT. Daher würden flexible Mulit-Energie-Systeme benötigt, die eine stabile Energieversorgung auch bei einem steigenden Erneuerbaren-Anteil sicherstellten. Die Herausforderung sei dabei, die fluktuierende Einspeisung aus regenerativen Energien sowie den Verbrauch mit Hilfe smarter Speichertechnologien so zu steuern, dass sie im Gleichgewicht sind und hybride Netze, etwa zur Strom- und Wärmeversorgung, effizient und ökonomisch betrieben werden könnten.
Europaweit gebe es zur verbesserten Integration von unterschiedlichen Energieträgern und Speichertechnologien ins Netz bereits eine Vielzahl von Forschungsvorhaben. Ihnen liegen jedoch unterschiedliche Ansätze, Instrumente und Rahmenbedingungen zugrunde, wie es beim KIT weiter hieß. Die sechs am Projekt beteiligten Forschungsinstitute wollen nun ihre Methoden und Ergebnisse zusammenführen. Es solle analysiert werden, welche Simulationen, Modelle und Optimierungen nur vergleichbar seien und verallgemeinert sowie als Teillösungen auf andere Zusammenhänge übertragen werden könnten. Dabei solle eine allgemein zugängliche Datenplattform entstehen, die dann auch anderen Forschern für ihre Arbeiten zur Verfügung stehen solle.
„Unser langfristiges Ziel ist es, diesen Zusammenschluss europäischer Forschungsvorhaben für weitere Partner zu öffnen und zu institutionalisieren“, so Südmeyer. Das Projekt laufe noch bis Ende November 2019. Das Gesamtbudget für „Smiles“ umfasse 2,44 Millionen Euro, wovon knapp 910.000 Euro in das KIT-Teilprojekt fließen würden. Das Forschungsvorhaben sei Teil der European Common Research and Innovation Agenda (ECRIA) und solle die Umsetzung der Ziele des Strategic Energy Technology Plan (SET-Plan) unterstützen, hieß es weiter.

Solarwatt senkt Preise seiner Glas-Glas-Module

Solarwatt senkt Preise seiner Glas-Glas-Module


Solarwatt kündigte am Montag an, die Preise für seine Glas-Glas-Solarmodule zu senken. Die anhaltend starke Nachfrage sowie die umfangreiche Modernisierung der Produktion in Dresden im ersten Halbjahr habe diese Preissenkung ermöglicht. Genaue Zahlen zur aktuellen Reduktion will Solarwatt auch auf Nachfrage von pv magazine nicht veröffentlichen. Der Photovoltaik-Hersteller erklärt allerdings, dass die Preise für die Glas-Glas-Solarmodule in den vergangenen zwei Jahren um rund ein Drittel gesunken sind – inklusive der aktuellen Reduktion.
„Unsere Premiummodule sind in der Tat gefragt wie nie“, erklärt Carsten Bovenschen, Geschäftsführer Finanzen der Solarwatt GmbH. „Seit letztem Jahr hat sich der Absatz unserer Glas-Glas-Module verdoppelt.“ Die Aufrüstung des Produktionsstandorts Dresden habe zu einer deutlichen Kapazitätserhöhung für die Fertigung von Glas-Glas-Modulen geführt. So sei etwa eine neue Generation multibusbarfähiger Stringer – Lötmaschinen installiert worden. „Durch die Kostenoptimierungen produzieren wir noch leistungsfähigere Module in kürzerer Zeit und zu geringeren Kosten“, ergänzte Solarwatt-Geschäftsführer Detlef Neuhaus. Daran wolle man nun auch die Kunden teilhaben lassen.
Der Anteil der Glas-Glas-Module an der Gesamtkapazität von 200 Megawatt liege nach der Aufrüstung bei 80 Prozent, sagte eine Solarwatt-Sprecherin. Glas-Folien-Solarmodule würde allerdings nur noch auf Kundenwunsch gefertigt. Der sächsische Photovoltaik-Hersteller gibt weiter an, dass wegen der Langlebigkeit und Leistungsstärke der Glas-Glas-Module die Kosten pro investiertem Euro bei diesen Anlagen nur halb so hoch wie bei herkömmlichen Varianten mit Glas-Folie-Modulen. Mit der neuerlichen Preissenkung würden die Module damit „auch für preissensitive Kunden immer interessanter“.

Researchers create solar cell and inverter in single device

Researchers create solar cell and inverter in single device


The research combined a photovoltaic material known as C60 fullerene, and magnetic electrodes of cobalt and nickel-iron, with spin valves – devices frequently used in magnetic memory and sensors – the result is a solar cell which the researchers say “offers a new way for solar cells to convert light into electricity”.
“The device is simply a PV cell,” explains Luis Hueso, leader of the nanodevices group at CIC nanoGUNE, speaking to IEEE Spectrum. “However, we are using magnetic electrodes (cobalt and nickel-iron) rather than standard indium-tin-oxide and aluminum.” Hueso goes on to explain that the use of magnetic electrodes creates what is known as a spin polarized current, which the researchers say increased the efficiency by 14% compared to cells using a regular electrode.
The researchers set out to develop a device with both a photovoltaic effect and a spin transport effect – something which had not previously been done. A side of this design is the conversion of the current from DC to AC. The current inversion, explains Hueso, is caused by a magnetic field, and the fact that the current inside the device comes from two sources – the light and the electrodes.
C60 fullerene was used to create this cell as it was already known to be a photovoltaic material which could sustain the spin polarization of electrons. The material, however, is not particularly efficient as a solar absorber, and was only used in this study to provide proof of concept. The researchers say they will now work on similar devices using more efficient materials.
While he acknowledges that a lot more work is needed, lead researcher Hueso says that he does believe that a commercial device acting as both solar module and inverter will be possible in the future.

Datang posts $81.2 million net profit in H1

Datang posts $81.2 million net profit in H1


Datang’s consolidated installed PV capacity hit 147.47 MW, up just 7.3% from the preceding year. Its bigger solar projects include 60 MW of operational capacity in China’s remote Qinghai province and 49 MW in the country’s Ningxia region, according to a statement to the Hong Kong stock exchange.
Profit attributable to the owners of the company hit 455.5 million yuan, from roughly CNY 211.8 million a year earlier. Revenue spiked 16.3% year on year to CNY 3.46 billion, according to unaudited results for the the first six months of the year. Sales of electricity accounted for the bulk of its revenue for the first half of 2017, although its transmission and EPC businesses generated combined revenue of CNY 39.62 million.
Average utilization of Datang’s PV projects throughout China reached 797.14 hours in the January-June period, up roughly 4% from the first six months of 2016. Utilization was highest in northern China’s Shanxi province, at 916.85 hours, and lowest in the coastal province of Jiangsu, at 543.56 hours.
Datang generated 3,937.3 GWh of electricity in the second quarter of 2017, up 19.2% year on year. Its wind projects accounted for roughly 98.2% of total production, although electricity generated by solar arrays and other renewables projects jumped 32.1% year on year in the second quarter to 71,108 MWh.
Throughout the rest of this year, Datang said it plans to continue to work on a number of undisclosed solar projects under the Chinese government’s Top Runner program. The diversified renewables developer — a unit of state-owned power group China Datang — recorded a profit attributable to shareholders of CNY 198.2 million in 2016, up significantly from just CNY 13.7 million in 2015.

Standards Australia to consult industry on proposed storage rules

Standards Australia to consult industry on proposed storage rules

KfW Rooftop

The Sydney-based organization received more than 3,000 comments on the draft proposal (DR AS/NZS 5139) it has been developing for battery storage standards in Australia. In particular, it said that many companies and individuals have expressed concerns over how battery storage systems should be installed in private homes.
Due to the “significant response” to its proposal, the country’s leading non-government standards development body has decided to temporarily pause its efforts to set new rules. In the meantime, it will bring key stakeholders together to discuss the formation of a framework through which they can address key policy-related concerns. It said that such industry-focused discussions are necessary because there are currently few government standards in place for storage batteries in Australia, particularly for residential construction requirements for onsite systems.
“Mandated residential construction requirements are ultimately public policy matters for governments,” it said in an online statement, noting that its policy recommendations are voluntary unless formally endorsed by government bodies. It only publishes standards based on agreements between the government, industry and community stakeholders.
Concerns about public safety, renewable energy and minimum residential construction requirements are among the policy-related issues that Standards Australia’s technical committee is unable to resolve on its own. It said that state governments need to clarify all outstanding concerns they have about battery storage policy before more progress can be made on setting industry standards.
“Standards Australia will continue to work with its technical committee and all stakeholders on this issue and hopes that a parallel policy dialogue will give our technical committee the guidance it needs,” it said.
Standards are desperately needed for the Australian residential storage market, which is growing quickly. Byron Bay-based consultancy Sunwiz expects 30,000 systems set to be installed throughout the country this year. However, a number of storage battery suppliers have argued in recent months that regulators and energy officials are holding back development.
Standards are now being developed in cooperation with the Energy Storage Council (ESC), an initiative under the Australian Solar Council. In June, the not-for-profit ESC and the Australian Solar Council issued a six-point plan to reform Australia’s energy market, in response to the recently issued Finkel review of the national electricity sector. Their proposals include setting plans to shut down coal-fired power stations and committing to a renewables target of at least 50% by 2030. They have also called for greater participation by Australian consumers in energy transactions, using peer-to-peer or aggregated services providers.

UK researchers launch PV generation forecasting tool

UK researchers launch PV generation forecasting tool


In a project entitled ‘Sheffield Solar’, researchers at the university are working closely with National Grid, the UK’s national grid operator, to develop a service that can forecast PV generation up to 72 hours in advance, to the benefit of grid operators, as well as self-consumers and energy traders.
Both in the UK, which enjoyed its first ‘coal free days’ in May and June of this year, and in other regions, renewable energy is beginning to account for a significant proportion of overall generation. With this comes the need for solutions to the inherent intermittency of renewable energy generation, to ensure that the grid can remain balanced.
Monitoring and forecasting energy production is one way to mitigate the effects of this – having advanced knowledge of pv output could allow operators to make more efficient use of reserve capacity from storage or conventional generation sources.
The Sheffield Solar team previously worked with the National Grid on a tool which estimates real-time generation from PV systems, and is now taking this a step further, by combining live output data with weather forecasts in order to accurately estimate future output. The tool is still being developed, and a free version is available until October 31st at the project’s website.
The team now plans to take the project further, and states that they are working on plans to provide forecasts on a regional basis, and for individual PV systems.