Gesamtzahl der Seitenaufrufe

Follower

Dienstag, 17. Oktober 2017

"We harvest solar power on the DC side"

"We harvest solar power on the DC side"

10/12/17, 2:00 PM -
The command unit of Solarwatt’s new storage systems MyReserve Matrix now works with only two narrow and small circuit boards. And for that they were awarded the prize of the storage exhibition EES in Munich. Head of innovations Andreas Gutsch explains what he thinks the future holds: direct charging with solar power – without DC controllers.
Andreas Gutsch is head of Solarwatt innovation and expert for lithium-ion batteries.
Andreas Gutsch is head of Solarwatt innovation and expert for lithium-ion batteries.

Every battery module of the Myreserve has an output of 800 watts. Now you have come out with the new matrix system that allows the combination of any number of battery packs. What consequences does that have on the overall unit’s performance?

Up to five battery packs are combined with a command unit which thus controls four kilowatts. The battery packs are connected in series and so, of course, the voltages add up. Every battery pack has 50 volts, so five packs together have 250 volts. The currents remain below 16 ampere, that was important to us. The systems output scales up according to the number of battery modules.

Why were you so keen on limiting the systems current?

In building power supply, 16 ampere are considered a standard for fuses. Exceeding this amperage makes the necessary cables, fuses and so on much more expensive. Also, higher currents cause greater losses in the system. So we increase the output by raising the voltages. The Matrix is so far certified for 250 volts, but it could achieve up to 750 volts. That would be 15 battery modules connected in parallel and with a total output of 12 kilowatts. We shall see if we will one day be able to realise this technical possibility.

Storage units are so far mostly designed according to capacity, i.e. the kilowatt hours that they can store. Will their charging and discharging output become more significant in the future?

I assume so. With falling battery prices and, for instance, rising demand because of electric mobility, stationary batteries will have to increase their output. Because a customer might want to charge their car overnight. So, yes that will come.

The MyReserve 800 will be integrated into the solar string and controlled by the inverter’s MPP tracker. How many strings can you connect to the Matrix?

Currently two. However, the system is based on a concept of clusters so that we will eventually be able to connect up installations with multiple strings. With two storage units with two strings each, one unit acts as the master unit and the other as its slave connected in parallel. They share the providing of electricity according to the demand from the building’s internal grid. The overall system is controlled to maximise service life: The storage units act in such a way that the batteries deteriorate as little as possible. The new units are already pre-configured to operate with clusters.

Why not more than two strings?

That will come in early 2018. The number of controllable strings, i.e. the cluster consisting of a command unit and a certain number of battery packs, is determined by the length of the bus cable. That must not exceed 150 metres, otherwise a signal amplifier is required.

Because the storage units are integrated into the PV string and are managed via the MPP tracker, neither the MyReserve nor the Matrix require a separate inverter. Does that work with all common models?

According to our experience, yes. So far we have had no problems, not even with older inverters. The one exception is SolarEdge, because their inverters communicate with the DC optimisers via the power line, i.e. through the DC cable from the solar panels to the input of the inverter. The high-frequency signal cannot make it past the capacitors of our storage unit. This creates a conflict.

Will you be able to solve the problem?

We understand what the issue is and will soon solve it. The key is that our storage units have to be able to deal with the MPP trackers of the other inverters. And SolarEdge do their MPP tracking in the DC optimiser within the solar panel. One solution might be to connect a communication bypass. Then our storage unit would also work with SolarEdge inverters.

Solarwatt is determined to stay with DC systems. Why not do what many of your competitors are doing and abandon DC in favour of AC systems?

Because we believe that this is the wrong decision. We will continue to harvest the solar power on the DC side. It is the most efficient way. In case of multi-string systems, we will need an AC charger, however. But that is also required to integrate fuel cells or small wind turbines, i.e. combine a number of generators. This will only be used for charging, while discharging will always happen via the inverter. That reduces complexity and keeps costs down.

Why will you not build a discharger?

The AC charger gives (municipal) utilities the opportunity to pursue new business models using our storage units. For instance, the units can act as a buffer in case of a surge in the grid – as a swarm or as part of a virtual power plant. To make that possible, the AC charger will have a data port in accordance with IEC 61850.

What are you doing about grid feed-in?

The solar inverter would be able to do that just as well or better. Mono-directional AC power electronics is much less expensive than bi-directional inverters with feed-in capabilities. An AC charger would be treated as an electricity consumer rather than a grid-connected generator. That would also solve a number of tax and other legal considerations.

Is it possible that it would make monitoring of the storage unit easier? AC systems usually have a monitoring portal for the solar inverter and a portal for the storage unit...

Because the storage unit is practically invisible to the monitoring system of the inverter, our monitoring is taken care of by one app and through one Bluetooth interface. After all, the battery runs through the MPP tracker, just like the solar string. But generally speaking, you are right: Monitoring is also less complicated if one continues to operate in DC.

What will the future hold for the power electronics of storage units?

On the one hand, I see storage manufacturers focussing their efforts on electronics and control software. This is our USP and we do not intend to let go of it. The software that controls the battery is very important even today. It impacts about 50 percent of the battery’s performance.

What do you mean by that?

The software that controls the storage unit, i.e. the battery management system, responsible for the battery’s rate of control, for regulating the load conditions and for gathering operational data. Rather than by way of the cells’ capacity, we measure the so-called ‘state of health’ by way of the internal resistance. Every battery module contains 12 cells, whose individual internal resistance has to be measured in real time. The overall computing power of a storage system is already greater than that of a laptop computer. To give just one figure: Our control software consists of 250,000 lines of code.

How important is IT security?

That has the highest priority for us. We will not allow third-party firmware as part of our storage units. Our partners can only access the battery through the data port in the AC charger that I mentioned before, allowing them to use it for their business models. In order to update the firmware, the technician has to access the unit via his laptop or smartphone to activate the Bluetooth connection manually. Externally uploading the firmware over the Internet is, in my opinion, a risky proposition. It is impossible to safeguard that no unauthorised person gains access to the system. Just imagine: Hackers set all batteries are to overcharge all at once. They would all blow up together.

The prices for lithium cells continue to fall. So for power electronics cost is becoming more and more of a factor. What can be done to reduce costs here?

First and foremost by mass-producing battery systems. Our Matrix system is one more step in that direction and demand seems to vindicate our approach. On the other hand, I am expecting technical advances in charging electronics. It may even be possible for it not to be necessary at all. We have recently acquired a patent for charging a battery directly from solar power, without a DC controller.

Sounds interesting. How would that work?

The idea is so simple and brilliant that one might almost be annoyed at not having thought of it ourselves. It has been well-known for a while that the performance curves of solar strings and lithium ion batteries are quite similar. They are a very good match, even without a voltage inverter between them. The same cannot be said for led cells. They have completely different charging characteristics. As part of a global selection process, we came across an interesting patent which takes this idea to its logical conclusion.

Can you outline the key features of this patent?

The storage unit is integrated into the solar string as a voltage sink by connecting the positive lead from the solar panels to the positive pole of the battery and the negative pole of the battery to the positive input of the inverter. Conventionally, the positive pole of the battery has been connected to solar positive and negative with negative. The patent’s solution means that the battery is connected serially as part of the positive lead of the solar string. That way the inverter treats the battery as a sink that lowers the voltage of the solar string by its own operating voltage.

Would you mind if we went through the figures?

Sure, it is amazingly simple. Imagine the solar string produces 400 volts and the battery is charged at 100 volts, the inverter only recognises 300 volts. A DC-DC converter is no longer necessary. This means that there is no loss in output otherwise caused by the electronics and we can achieve a charging efficiency of 99 percent. However, there is one catch.

What would that be?

Discharging, which is controlled by the power demand of the building and is not as trivial as charging. Shall we have the inverter manage discharging or will we include a specialised DC discharging system on the DC side? We will have to take a closer look at that. We own the patent for the next 20 years, rather than just licences, and we will see how we are going to make use of it. But you can be sure that we did not just buy this patent to hide it away somewhere.
The interview was conducted by Heiko Schwarzburger.

Optimize solar facades

Optimize solar facades

10/16/17, 11:01 AM -
Most solar modules are mounted on rooftops; very few are integrated into buildings' envelopes. The Centre for Solar Energy and Hydrogen Research Baden-Württemberg (ZSW) aims to change that with a research project to optimize CIGS thin-film PV for facades.
CIGS facade at the building of ZSW in Stuttgart, where the researchers measure the yield.
CIGS facade at the building of ZSW in Stuttgart, where the researchers measure the yield.
Boom-time may be coming soon for building-integrated photovoltaics (BIPV). An EU directive requires all new buildings to be nearly zero-energy by the end of 2020. They will have to be built so that almost no extrinsic energy is required for heating, hot water, ventilation and cooling. European countries like Germany has also set its sights on a climate-friendly, carbon-neutral building sector by 2050. These goals will be hard to achieve without facades significantly contributing to the solar yield, which is why experts and scientists predict that architects and building planners will be making greater use of this technology. For German makers of thin-film modules and manufacturing systems, this is an opportunity to capitalize on an emerging mass market.

Helping BIPV break through

"In this research project, we're looking at the entire system of a thin-film photovoltaic facade," explains Dieter Geyer, project manager at ZSW. "We're optimizing the module's design for energy yield, shadow tolerance, installation ease, and flexibility in module size, and we're adapting it to the system's other components." ZSW researchers are investigating the electronic components' safety, functionality and reliability. They are also examining CIGS facades' energy efficiency potential to determine how the building itself can meet electrical power and thermal energy demands.
ZSW is performing the design calculations, conducting lab and field tests, and collecting operating data. Its researchers are assessing and comparing the different system's performance and yield in field tests on the CIGS facade at the institute's new building in Stuttgart and at the Widderstall testing facility. These operating data will be loaded to a simulation to help researchers determine to what extent CIGS facade systems can cover the demand for electrical power in different types of buildings. The project will also look at rear-ventilated, PV double facades and heat pumps. The designated partners aim to manufacture the optimized facade-mounted modules and system components when the project is concluded.
The ZSW's partners in this endeavor are the Research Centre for Sustainable Energy Technology  at the Stuttgart University of Applied Sciences and Manz CIGS Technology. Associated partners include AVANCIS, Gartner Instruments, KACO new energy, SMA Solar Technology and SolarEdge Technologies.

Solar facades—more than merely a source of energy

Around three quarters of all photovoltaic systems are perched on rooftops; the other quarter is ground-mounted. Despite their great benefits, the number of building-integrated systems is infinitesimal by comparison. BIPV panels generate electrical energy, but they also afford much the same protection against wind and weather as conventional facades of similar quality. They insulate the building against noise, heat, cold and glare while allowing daylight to brighten the interior. The German Energy Saving Ordinance EnEV has acknowledged the merits of this application by awarding a higher DIN 18599 building class.
On top of all this, CIGS thin-film modules have aesthetic advantages that benefit facades. Unlike crystalline silicon PV cells, CIGS thin-film modules' cell structure is hardly discernible. This means the modules offer the same leeway as glass to facade designers, including homogeneous surfaces and elegant color choices. Variable module sizes, special shapes and structured surfaces are also available.
Studies have shown that the additional economically usable facade area for BIPV in cities amounts to around ten percent, on average, of the economically usable roof area. Many facades offer more space than rooftops, especially those on buildings higher than three stories. Integrated photovoltaic panels cost more than conventional rooftop modules. However, cost calculations merely have to factor in the markup on a conventional facade when a new envelope is being built. Such calculations show that solar facades can pay off within ten years.
Another interesting aspect is the higher value of electricity from facades, where production may peak in the morning or evening hours, depending on orientation. This offers an opportune alternative to the usual midday peak. And if a battery is to be installed for nighttime power, it can be smaller. In addition, vertically arrayed BIPV systems' are better positioned to capture the low winter's sun rays. They also have a great advantage over rooftop systems in snowy conditions, as they deliver a consistent yield and can increase the share of electricity consumed on site. All this adds up to a golden opportunity for an underused technology. (HCN)

Europe is planning battery cell production

Europe is planning battery cell production

10/13/17, 11:00 AM -
The EU is striving to build a complete value chain for the production of battery energy storage. A strategic plan is planned for the coming year.
The EU wants to build up the whole value chain for batteries. So far manufacturers are sourcing the battery cells from Asia.
The EU wants to build up the whole value chain for batteries. So far manufacturers are sourcing the battery cells from Asia.
Europe wants to produce batteries itself. In the EU, EU member states want to cover the entire value chain with a pan-European battery production - from the production of the raw materials through the cell to the finished storage device. To date, this value chain only includes the assembly of the accumulators - both for the electric cars as well as for stationary equipment. The cells usually come from East Asia and are mostly produced with the raw materials produced there. The market leader here is China, followed by Korea and Japan.

EU needs its own cell production

This should change in perspective. In Brussels, the Commissioner for Energy Commissioner Maroš Šefčovič met the representatives of the relevant ministries in the EU Member States to mutually confirm that a pan-European battery cell production is necessary. "We need European sovereignty in key technologies, and battery cell technology is one of the most important differentiating factors in electromobility”, Matthias Machnig, State Secretary in the Federal Ministry of Economics said. "If Germany wants to remain a premium manufacturer, we need independent production for battery cells."
The Polish government's representative also stressed that her government wanted to take charge of the promotion of batteries and to promote the construction of large production plants. By the year 2025 there should be one million electric vehicles in Poland. And in public transport, more than 30 percent of vehicles should be free of emissions. The French government's representative also called for the development and production of batteries in Europe.

Plan is to stand until February

Šefčovič wants to be assured that the batteries are also available when they are needed. Independence from Asian suppliers is crucial, he stressed. In order to achieve that, the Commission draws on the cooperation of the Member States and the support of the European Investment Bank. But the mills grind slowly. Firstly, a strategic plan is to be drawn up in February on how the target can be achieved. According to Šefčovič, this could then be presented at the Clean Energy Industrial Forum within the framework of the EU Industrial Days. (HCN/SU)

Tesla Fires 400-700 Workers

Tesla Fires 400-700 Workers

file
Tesla Inc. has fired an undetermined number of employees following a series of performance evaluations after the company significantly boosted its workforce with the purchase of solar panel maker SolarCity Corp.
The departures are part of an annual review, the Palo Alto, California-based company said in an email, without providing a number of people affected. The maker of the Model S this week dismissed between 400 and 700 employees, including engineers, managers and factory workers, the San Jose Mercury News reported on Oct. 13, citing unidentified current and former workers.
“As with any company, especially one of over 33,000 employees, performance reviews also occasionally result in employee departures,” the company said in the statement. “Tesla is continuing to grow and hire new employees around the world.”
The company has more than 2,000 job openings on its careers website.
The dismissals come after Tesla said it built just 260 Model 3 sedans during the third quarter, less than a fifth of its 1,500-unit forecast. The company has offered scant detail about the problems it’s having producing the car. The vehicle’s entry price starts at $35,000, roughly half the cost of Tesla’s least-expensive Model S sedan.
A delayed ramp-up risks the ire of some of the almost half million reservation holders who started paying $1,000 deposits early last year. On Oct. 12, Tesla Chief Executive Officer Elon Musk posted a video on Instagram of what he said was a stamping press producing body panels for the Model 3.

In September, Tesla announced it was phasing out 63 positions at SolarCity Corp.’s Roseville, California office, according to Business Insider. Tesla dismissed the employees after it bought the company, which manufacturers and installs rooftop solar panels, for about $2 billion in 2016.
SolarCity had about 12,243 full-time employees as of the end of last year.
Lead image credit: DepositPhotos.com.

Swiss Solar Decathlon House Scores a Perfect 100 in Engineering

Swiss Solar Decathlon House Scores a Perfect 100 in Engineering

file
Acting Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Daniel Simmons today announced the winning team of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Solar Decathlon 2017 in Denver, Colorado. The Swiss Team took first place overall by designing, building, and operating the house that best blended smart energy production with innovation, market potential, and energy and water efficiency. The University of Maryland took second place followed by the University of California, Berkeley and University of Denver team in third place.
“The U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon provides real-world training and experience for the energy professionals of tomorrow,” said Acting Assistant Secretary Simmons. “It is also a live demonstration of innovative products available today that can help tackle global energy challenges such as reliability, resilience, and security.”
The teams competed in 10 contests throughout a nine-day stretch that gauged each house’s performance, livability and market potential. They performed everyday tasks including cooking, laundry and washing dishes, which tested the energy efficiency of each house. Full competition results and details about the individual contests may be found at www.SolarDecathlon.gov.
“This prestigious competition engages students from across the country and internationally to develop the skills and knowledge to become the next generation of energy experts, and I want to recognize all of these teams for their hard work and dedication,” said Linda Silverman, director of the Solar Decathlon. “Today’s results are the culmination of two years of collaboration among students from different academic disciplines — including engineering, architecture, interior design, business, marketing, and communications — who otherwise might not work together until they enter the workplace. Together, we’re ensuring that employers have the qualified workers they need to support American job growth.”

The results of the Market Potential and Engineering contests were also announced today. Northwestern took first place in market potential by scoring 92 of 100 possible points. For the Market Potential Contest, each competing house was evaluated by a jury of professionals from the home-building industry that evaluated the overall attractiveness of the design to the target client and the market impact potential of the house. Some of the criteria included appeal and marketability for the target client, the livability in meeting the target client’s unique needs, the house’s cost-effectiveness, and how easily the competition prototype could be constructed successfully by a general contractor.
Bob Dixon, director of the Office of Strategic Programs in the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy at DOE, presenting the award, said, “The jury said that this team exhibited an outstanding use of focus groups, in-home visitation, storyboards, and a socio-linguistic analysis used to identify and validate design attributes through interviews in their target market segment.”
Team Netherlands claimed second place in the Market Potential Contest with 90 points, and Team Daytona Beach took third place with 85 points.
The Swiss Team took first place in engineering with a perfect score of 100 possible points. For the Engineering Contest, each competing house was evaluated by a group of prominent engineers who determined which house best exemplifies excellence in innovation, system functionality, energy efficiency, system reliability, and documentation through their project manual and construction drawings.
Bob Dixon, presenting the award said, “The jury believes the first-place house in the Engineering Contest offers comprehensive performance modeling that sports clear graphs, detailed explanations and a variety of representations. The quality of the thermal envelope is exceptional and carefully calibrated to the target climate with very good resistance to heat flow, a solid focus on airtightness, and high-quality components such as triple-glazed windows and sliding doors.”
University of Nevada, Las Vegas claimed second place in the Engineering Contest with 98 points, and Northwestern took third place with 95 points.
This year’s collegiate teams were chosen nearly two years ago through a competitive process. The selected teams and their projects represent a diverse range of design approaches, building technologies, and geographic locations, climates and regions – including urban, suburban and rural settings. They also aim to reach a broad range of target housing markets including empty-nesters, disaster relief, low-income, multigenerational, single-family and Native American communities. Teams have gathered their combined interdisciplinary talents to design and build the houses, as well as to raise funds, furnish and decorate the houses, and optimize the houses’ performance.

How to Balance the Solar Efficiency Equation

How to Balance the Solar Efficiency Equation

solar
The National Renewable Energy Laboratory’s solar cell efficiencies chart depicts confirmed conversion efficiencies for research cells from 1976 to date, for several PV technologies. But as conventional crystalline silicon (c-Si) PV modules approach peak efficiency, with the leap from lab to life—or from demonstration to mass production—occasionally taking over 30 years, the final question is: what is the additional watt class worth?
Charlie Gay, Solar Energy Technologies Office Director for the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (US DOE) explains:
“There are a lot of moving parts in the efficiency story. In the numerator, you have $/unit of area and in the denominator watt/unit of area. You need to work on both simultaneously. The benefits of efficiency are seen in reducing total installed cost while maximizing the energy harvest (kWh/Watt) over time. You want the module to be efficient at all times, under all conditions, without compromising aging.”

For now, passivated emitter and rear cell or rear contact (PERC) technology seems to be the leading variable in the efficiency equation, beating out contenders such as silicon hetero junction (SHJ), interdigitated back contact (IBC) and IBC-SHJ. (See technical note.)
Taipei-based research provider TrendForce estimates that PERC cell capacity will reach 25 GW by year end, accounting for 44 percent of global production capacity of PV cells by 2020. The 2016 International Technology Roadmap PV for Roadmap for c-Si concurs that PERC — and variants PERL (passivated emitter, rear locally diffused) and PERT (passivated emitter rear totally diffused) — will account for 60 percent of cell technology market share by 2027; technology refinements across design and manufacturing allowing delivery of 60 cell modules with ~325 Wp for multicrystalline-silicon (mc-si) and 340 Wp for mono-Si, respectively, by 2027.
Cemil Seber is VP Global Marketing & Product Management at ‎REC Group, which bet on PERC technology several years ago to squeeze maximum power from its mc-SI platform. In March 2015, REC announced that its first product shipments based on PERC technology (TwinPeak 60 cell panels rated up to 275 Wp) would be to Tucson Electric Power for the utility’s residential solar power program.
The panels incorporated 120 half-cut multicrystalline cells, four busbars, PERC technology, and a split junction box. This year, the company launched three new products based on its TwinPeak technology—the TwinPeak 2 (rated up to 295 Wp), the TwinPeak 2S 72 (rated up to 350 Wp), and the full black TwinPeak 2 BLK2 panel (rated up to 285Wp), targeted at homeowners. The TwinPeak 2 and TwinPeak 2S 72 set new world records in the 60-cell and 72-cell multicrystalline panels categories.
“PERC technology allows REC to compete with monocrystalline silicon,” Seber said. “With PERC, you get an extra 8-10 Wp. That’s a lot of extra power from a single technology. However, our TwinPeak modules, (essentially two modules connected in parallel) and other technical features, such as the split junction box and 5 busbar also contribute to enhanced performance. And at REC, we know very well how to strictly control potential degradation processes in the long run.
Seber said that, in the almost three years that REC has been shipping TwinPeak products, the company has not had any returns due to malfunction from degradation.
Though PERC technology was first demonstrated in 1983, Gay said that there are numerous proof points needed for PV at every step from lab to market.
“High throughput tools (4,500 wafers/hour) first need to be in place,” he said. “For example, you need improvements in tools to deposit coatings like aluminum oxide and create window openings. Module manufacturing is like the construction industry, you don’t want raw material waste. How to scale mass production while maintaining high throughput and high yield?”
Seber acknowledges that at REC, implementation of PERC and TwinPeak technology required upgrading cell and module production lines and assembly equipment.
“Being able to cut full size cells in half and bringing under control breakage levels was one of the challenges to overcome” he said.
Technology aside, the efficiency equation is balanced by the market asking, “What is the cost per watt?”
According to Seber, uptake of REC’s 72-cell panels has been higher in the U.S. than in Europe, where even engineering, procurement, and construction companies are used to do large installations with 60-cell panels.
He said that regional demand differences for 60 versus 72-cell panels are reinforced by the weight of the different market segments (residential, C&I, utility) in the total market.
“We are still not seeing a strong demand for 72-cell panels in Europe; however, when customers see a reduction in system costs with 72-cell panels they’ll make the switch,” he said.
Technical note:
High conversion efficiencies contribute to decreasing the levelized cost of electricity (LCOE).
According to the paper Technology Trend of High Efficiency Crystalline Silicon Solar Cells, PERC is focused on improving quality at the back of the solar cell. The first demonstrated in 1983 was part of the first wave of doctoral dissertations in PV, and it built on work from the space program. It increases cell efficiency by reflecting back the light which passed through the cell without creating electrons, essentially giving photons “a second chance” to generate current. The extra energy yield of the reflected light is further boosted by an increased ability to capture light over a range of wavelengths, e.g., when the sun is at an angle in the early morning or evening, or if the weather is cloudy.
SHJ technology increases open circuit voltage (can be done with front and back contacts or all back contacts).
IBC technology increases photo-induced current density because of the shadow loss suppression, i.e. more light is allowed into the cell.
Mono-crystalline PERC cell efficiency is 22.61 percent; that of multi-crystalline PERC 21.63 percent. The maximum efficiency of SHJ and IBC are both over 25 percent; the highest efficiency of the IBC-SHJ cell has reached 26.33 percent.
Lead image credit: depositphotos.com

Wahlergebnis eröffnet neue Chancen für die deutsche Energiepolitik

Wahlergebnis eröffnet neue Chancen für die deutsche Energiepolitik


Die Wähler haben den Politikern in Berlin den klaren Auftrag erteilt, einen Regierungswechsel vorzubereiten. Die Spitzen von CDU/CSU, FDP und Grünen müssen sich nun ihrer Verantwortung bewusst werden, diese übernehmen und einen tragfähigen Koalitionsvertrag aushandeln. Damit stellen sie die Weichen für eine stabile Regierung und ermöglichen unserem Land, von einer zukunftsorientierten Energiepolitik zu profitieren. Die neuen Koalitionspartner der CDU – FDP und Grüne – lassen eine Ausgeglichenheit erwarten: Während bei den Grünen der Ausbau der erneuerbaren Energiegewinnungsarten im Vordergrund stehen dürfte, werden die Vertreter der FDP die Interessen der mittelständischen Unternehmer dieser Branche und der Stromverbraucher zu wahren wissen. Sie tun gut daran, denn auf dem Rücken der Konsumenten werden ganz sachfremde Interessen ausgetragen. Das ist nicht nur unfair, sondern auch vollkommen überflüssig.
Mit der EEG-Umlage bezahlen die Verbraucher eine Subvention, die neuere Solaranlagen nicht benötigen, um wettbewerbsfähig Strom zu erzeugen. Lassen Sie mich dies an einem Beispiel verdeutlichen, das bewusst plakativ gewählt wurde: Der Durchschnittsdeutsche bezieht seinen Strom für 27 Cent pro Kilowattstunde von einem etablierten Energieversorger. Wenn er zuvor einen nicht ganz unerheblichen Rechercheaufwand betrieben und Preisvergleiche angestellt hat, findet er vielleicht einen Stromanbieter, der ihn für 22 Cent pro Kilowattstunde beliefert. Immer noch viel zu viel, denn: Selbst bei den denkbar ungünstigsten Rahmenbedingungen, etwa einer kleinen Photovoltaikanlage auf dem Dach eines Hauses im regenreichsten Gebiet Norddeutschlands lässt sich der Strom für rund zehn Cent pro Kilowattstunde selbst produzieren.
Ich habe mitunter den Eindruck, dass die Gutmütigkeit der Bevölkerung ausgenutzt wird. Über die Parteigrenzen hinweg sind die meisten Wähler bereit, den grünen Strom mit ein paar Cent pro Kilowattstunden zu fördern, weil sie die Energiegewinnung aus regenerativen Quellen aus guten Gründen befürworten. Diese Förderung ist in dieser Form nicht mehr notwendig. Es kann nicht oft und deutlich genug gesagt werden: Insbesondere Solarstrom lässt sich mittlerweile deutlich günstiger produzieren als ihn aus dem Netz zu beziehen.
Ein Teil der Einnahmen aus der EEG-Umlage bzw. Steuereinnahmen werden darauf verwendet, den Rückbau der Atomkraftwerke zu finanzieren und die gefährlichen Abfallprodukte dieser Energiegewinnungsart zu entsorgen. Perfider Weise wird so Atomstrom mit Mitteln für den Ausbau von Solarstrom subventioniert. Das ist politischer Irrsinn! Es sollten vielmehr Rücklagen in einer Zeit gebildet werden, in der man günstigen Atomstrom teuer an die Endverbraucher verkauft hat. Genau das hat aber real nie stattgefunden, die großen Energieversorger haben nur buchhalterisch Rückstellungen für den Rückbau gebildet. Damit steht dieses Geld für den Rückbau real gar nicht zur Verfügung. Die Steuerzahler werden somit erneut zur Kasse gebeten. Dass diese Beträge weit über dem Niveau der Einspeiseförderung der letzten Jahre liegen, geben Politiker nur ungern zu. Die neue Regierung muss hier entgegensteuern.
Der Einwand, man benötige die zusätzlichen Einnahmen der EEG-Umlage zum Ausbau der Netze, trägt ebenfalls nicht. Die auf dem Festland errichteten Solar-, Windenergie-, Wasserkraft- und Biomasseanlagen stehen so, dass eine flächendeckende Stromversorgung grundsätzlich ohne einen weiteren Netzausbau möglich ist. Lediglich in einzelnen Fällen können Netzkorrekturen erforderlich sein, vor allem da, wo Atom-Kraftwerke abgeschaltet werden. Gigantische Investitionssummen, von denen die Medien berichten, werden nur dort erforderlich, wo die Energie-Autobahnen ausgebaut werden müssen, um den von Offshore-Windparks in der Nordsee erzeugten Strom nach Bayern zu transportieren.
Auf erneuerbare Energien zu setzen, ist aber längst nicht mehr nur wirtschaftlich sinnvoll. Es ist schlicht alternativlos. Denn wenn wir endlich aufhören, in Zeiträumen von Legislaturperioden zu denken, sondern den Blick auf die nächsten 40 Jahre richten, werden wir erkennen, dass uns die fossilen Energieträger dann nicht mehr zur Verfügung stehen werden. Damit meine ich nicht, dass sich verteuert haben werden – ich meine, dass sie dann schlicht aufgebraucht sein werden. Damit wäre der wichtigste Auftrag an die gewählten Jamaika-Koalitionäre schon definiert.
 — Der Autor Thorsten Preugschas blickt auf rund 15 Jahre Erfahrung in der Solarbranche zurück. Als geschäftsführender Gesellschafter brachte er die Maaß Regenerative-Energien GmbH in die Colexon Energy AG ein und schuf damit einen der führenden börsennotierten Projektentwickler im deutschsprachigen Raum. Im Jahr 2006 wurde er zum CEO der Colexon Energy AG ernannt. Mit dem Zusammenschluss der Colexon Energy AG mit der dänischen Renewagy A/S im Jahr 2009 formte Preugschas den ersten vollintegrierten börsennotierten Projektentwickler und Betreiber von Solarkraftwerken in Deutschland mit einer Marktkapitalisierung von mehr als 150 Millionen Euro. Im Jahr 2011 wechselte Thorsten Preugschas zur Soventix GmbH, die sich unter seiner Geschäftsführung zu einem der erfolgreichsten international agierenden Solarprojektentwicklern Deutschlands entwickelte. Weitere Informationen finden Sie unter www.soventix.com. —

EEG-Umlage 2018 bei 6,792 Cent pro Kilowattstunde

EEG-Umlage 2018 bei 6,792 Cent pro Kilowattstunde


Die Übertragungsnetzbetreiber 50Hertz, Amprion, Tennet und TransnetBW haben am Montag die EEG-Umlage für den nicht-privilegierten Letztverbrauch für das Jahr 2018 veröffentlicht: Sie wird 6,792 Cent pro Kilowattstunde betragen. Dies ist verglichen mit dem laufenden Jahr, in dem der Wert bei 6,88 Cent pro Kilowattstunde liegt, ein Rückgang um 1,3 Prozent. Insgesamt soll der Umlagebetrag 2018 bei 23,78 Milliarden Euro liegen, teilten die Übertragungsnetzbetreiber weiter mit. Dies seien im Wesentlichen die Vergütungen für Photovoltaik, Windkraft und Co abzüglich der Börsenerlöse sowie unter Berücksichtigung des EEG-Kontostands zu Ende September und der Liquiditätsreserve.
Zur Zusammensetzung der EEG-Umlage geben die Übertragungsnetzbetreiber in der dazugehörigen Studie an, dass etwa 2,7 Cent auf die Photovoltaik entfallen, 1,8 Cent auf die Biomasse, 1,6 Cent auf Windenergie an Land und 1,0 Cent auf Offshore-Windenergie.
Konventionelle Energieträger wie Kohle und Atom verursachen deutlich höhere Kosten als erneuerbare Energien. Das hat das Forum Ökologisch-Soziale Marktwirtschaft (FÖS) im Auftrag des Ökoenergieanbieters Greenpeace Energy berechnet. Würde man die Belastungen des Staatshaushalts sowie die externen Kosten durch konventionelle Energien nach EEG-Methode auf die Verbraucher verteilen und auf der Stromrechnung ausweisen, läge eine solche „Konventionelle-Energien-Umlage“ im Jahr 2017 bei bis zu 11,5 Cent pro Kilowattstunde; für das Jahr 2018 rechnen die Studienautoren mit einer gesamtgesellschaftliche Belastung durch Kohle- und Atomkraft in einer ähnlichen Größenordnung.
Die Übertragungsnetzbetreiber prognostizieren für das Jahr 2018 eine weiter ansteigende Erzeugung an elektrischer Energie aus regenerativen Anlagen: von etwa 187 Terawattstunden (TWh) im Jahr 2017 auf etwa 204 TWh im Jahr 2017. Das spiegele vor allem den Ausbau der Windenergie an Land und auf See wider. Abzüglich der prognostizierten Börsenerlöse, die sich im Wesentlichen aufgrund des gestiegenen Börsenpreises im Vergleich zum Vorjahr um rund 16 Prozent erhöht hätten, ergebe sich für das Jahr 2018 eine prognostizierte Deckungslücke von etwa 25,6 Milliarden Euro.
In die finale Umlageberechnung fließen zusätzlich der aktuelle Stand des EEG-Kontos sowie die so genannte Liquiditätsreserve ein. Den Übertragungsnetzbetreibern zufolge war das EEG-Konto war zum 30. September 2017 mit 3,3 Milliarden Euro im Plus. Diese positive Deckung senke die EEG-Umlage 2018 rechnerisch um knapp einen Cent pro Kilowattstunde. Die Liquiditätsreserve, welche Schwankungen auf dem EEG-Konto und deren Auswirkungen auf die EEG-Umlage abfedert, werde mit sechs Prozent angesetzt – bezogen auf die prognostizierte Deckungslücke. Sie liege 2018 bei gut 1,5 Milliarden Euro, was die EEG-Umlage um etwa 0,4 Cent pro Kilowattstunde erhöhe.
Für das Jahr 2022 erwarten die Netzbetreiber eine installierte Leistung erneuerbarer Energiequellen von knapp 135 Gigawatt, wovon auf die Photovoltaik 53 Gigawatt und die Windenergie 72 Gigawatt entfallen. Die prognostizierte Jahresarbeit wird für das Jahr 2022 mit über 249 TWh beziffert. Dabei werde davon ausgegangen, dass 2022 rund 17 Prozent der Stromerzeugung aus erneuerbaren Energien (knapp 42 TWh) die feste Einspeisevergütung nach Paragraf 21 EEG 2017 in Anspruch nehmen. Hierfür seien Einspeisevergütungen in Höhe von knapp 11,3 Milliarden Euro an die Anlagenbetreiber zu zahlen. Zusätzlich rechnen die Netzbetreiber mit prognostizierten Erzeugungsmengen von rund 190 TWh aus Anlagen in der geförderten Direktvermarktung sowie mit den auf diese Erzeugungsmengen entfallenden Prämienzahlungen von 17,4 Milliarden Euro. Des Weiteren werden Zahlungen in Form von Flexibilitätsprämie beziehungsweise Flexibilitätszuschlag für Biomasseanlagen in Höhe von 0,2 Milliarden Euro abgeschätzt. Außerdem werden für 2022 rund 12,04 TWh für weitere Formen der Direktvermarktung sowie 5,5 TWh an Erzeugung erwartet, die direkt vor Ort verbraucht werden.
Nach Einschätzung der Gutachter wird der Nettostrombedarf bis zum Jahr 2022 auf knapp 511 TWh zurückgehen, außerdem rechnen sie nur noch mit einer leichten Zunahme des umlagefreien bzw. privilegierten Eigenverbrauchs von insgesamt rund 2,2 TWh. Der privilegierte Letztverbrauch soll demnach von rund 115 TWh im Jahr 2018 auf knapp 113 TWh im Jahr 2022 absinken; der nicht-privilegierte Letztverbrauch soll 2022 bei rund 329 TWh liegen.

Leclanché meldet mehr Umsatz und weniger Verlust

Leclanché meldet mehr Umsatz und weniger Verlust


Einen Umsatz in Höhe von 10,6 Millionen Schweizer Franken (rund 9,2 Millionen Euro) meldet Leclanché für das erste Halbjahr 2017 – ein Plus von 74 Prozent im Vergleich zum ersten Halbjahr des Vorjahres. Darin sind allerdings Sondereffekte enthalten, vor allem 2,17 Millionen Franken aus der abschließenden Regelung eines Brandes in einer Halle der Zellfertigung im April 2016. Der operative Verlust sank dem Energiespeicher-Unternehmen zufolge von 12,9 Millionen Schweizer Franken im ersten Halbjahr 2016 auf 9,53 Millionen im ersten Halbjahr 2017 (8,29 Millionen Euro), in der Gesamtbetrachtung liegt das Minus in der Berichtsperiode bei 11,9 Millionen Schweizer Franken oder 10,35 Millionen Euro (H1 2016: 17,3 Millionen Schweizer Franken). Insgesamt sieht sich das Unternehmen auf Kurs. Im Gesamtjahr soll der Umsatz über dem des Vorjahres (28,5 Millionen Schweizer Franken) liegen, die EBITDA-Gewinnschwelle soll Ende 2018 oder im ersten Halbjahr 2019 erreicht werden.
Leclanché-CEO Anil Srivastava bezeichnete den Markt für Speicherlösungen als einen der dynamischsten Wachstumsmärkte der Welt. Er rechne bereits in den kommenden Wochen mit dem Eingang „einiger signifikanter Aufträge“. Das Speicher-Unternehmen baue gerade Projekte mit inegsamt 70 Megawatt bzw. 55 Megawattstunden, die Projektpipeline habe ein Volumen von 700 Megawattstunden.

EEG-Konto mit 3,3 Milliarden Euro im Plus

EEG-Konto mit 3,3 Milliarden Euro im Plus


Der Überschuss auf dem EEG-Konto ist im September erwartungsgemäß weiter gesunken. Während Ende August knapp 3,69 Milliarden Euro auf dem Konto lagen, waren es Ende September noch gut 3,3 Milliarden Euro. Der Kontostand nahm im September deutlich stärker ab als im August, aber weniger als im Juli, wie aus der aktualisierten Statistik der Übertragungsnetzbetreiber hervorgeht. Zudem liegt das Plus deutlich über dem Vorjahresniveau: Ende September 2016 betrug es rund 1,94 Milliarden Euro.
Wie die Statistiken der Vorjahre zeigen, ist in den kommenden Monaten tendenziell nicht mit einem weiteren Abschmelzen des Überschusses zu rechnen. Statt dessen dürfte der Kontostand wieder steigen. Negative Strompreise weist die Seite Netztransparenz im September übrigens nicht aus. Das bedeutet, dass EEG-Anlagenbetreiber, die sich in der Direktvermarktung befinden, im gesamten September eine Vergütung für den produzierten Strom erhalten haben.

Vielfältige Reaktionen auf die EEG-Umlage 2018

Vielfältige Reaktionen auf die EEG-Umlage 2018


Die vielfältigen Positionen zum Erneuerbare-Energien-Gesetz sowie Tempo und Kosten der Energiewende spiegeln sich auch in den Reaktionen auf die EEG-Umlage 2018 wider. Aus Sicht des Bayerischen Industrie- und Handelskammertages (BIHK) wirken sich die hohen Kosten der Energiewende spürbar auf die Investitionstätigkeit der bayerischen Unternehmen aus: Einer aktuellen Umfrage zufolge haben über ein Viertel der befragten Industriebetriebe im Freistaat bereits Maßnahmen zur Produktionsverlagerung ins Ausland in Angriff genommen, abgeschlossen oder in Planung. „Um die Abwanderung der Industrie zu stoppen, gibt es keine Alternative zu einer deutlichen, vor allem aber nachhaltigen Kostensenkung bei der Energiewende“, sagt BIHK-Hauptgeschäftsführer Peter Driessen. Der leichte Rückgang der EEG-Umlage 2018 sei zwar eine Verschnaufpause, aber noch lange keine Trendwende.
Der Verband der Chemischen Industrie (VCI) drängt ebenfalls auf weitere Reformen des EEG. „Der geringe Rückgang von nicht einmal 0,1 Cent ist in keiner Weise ausreichend für die notwendige Entlastung des Mittelstandes in der chemischen Industrie, der derzeit über eine Milliarde Euro EEG-Umlage beim Strompreis verkraften muss“, sagt VCI-Hauptgeschäftsführer Utz Tillmann. Die meisten Experten würden zudem für die kommenden Jahre mit einem weiteren Ansteigen der Umlage rechnen, der Reformdruck sei daher weiterhin groß.
Tobias Austrup sieht das anders: „Mit den sinkenden Preisen für sauberen Strom verlieren Union und FDP ihr letztes Argument gegen eine schnellere Energiewende. Während der Ausbau der erneuerbaren Energien fortschreitet, bleiben die Kosten für die Stromkunden konstant“, sagt der Greenpeace-Energieexperte. Eine Jamaika-Koalition müsse den Ausbau des Ökostroms massiv beschleunigen, wenn die neue Bundesregierung die Klimaziele noch einhalten wolle. Denn für den Kohleausstieg und die Verkehrswende seien deutlich mehr Windräder, Solaranlagen und moderne Stromnetze nötig.
„Der Anstieg der EEG-Umlage ist vorerst gebremst. Die Ergebnisse der ersten Ausschreibungen deuten auf weiteres Potenzial zur Steigerung der Kosteneffizienz beim Erneuerbaren-Ausbau hin“, kommentiert BDEW-Chef Stefan Kapferer die Höhe der EEG-Umlage 2018. Jetzt müsse das EEG weiter- und fortentwickelt werden. Die neue Bundesregierung müsse beispielsweise zeitnah eine dauerhaft tragfähige, wettbewerbsfreundliche Regelung für das Bürgerenergie-Privileg einführen. Zudem müsse die Besondere Ausgleichsregelung für stromintensive Industrien aus der EEG-Umlage herausgenommen und über den Bundeshaushalt finanziert werden. Die größte Fehlentwicklung liegt jedoch in der Zusammensetzung des Strompreises. Die Politik müsse sich Gedanken machen, wie sie den Strompreis von dem Ballast an staatlichen Abgaben entlasten könne.
Auch der Bundesverband Erneuerbare Energie (BEE) plädiert für systemische Korrekturen an der Systematik der Umlagen und Abgaben im Strombereich, die zu weiteren Preissenkungen führen würden. Neben der Finanzierung der Industrieprivilegien aus dem Bundeshaushalt müsse die konventionelle Stromerzeugung mit einem CO2-Preis belegt und damit die Stromsteuer ersetzt werden. Aus Sicht des Solarclusters Baden-Württemberg könnten mit einem höheren CO2-Preis im Grunde alle Fördertatbestände aus dem Energierecht, wie etwa die EEG-Einspeisevergütung, durch den Markt ersetzt werden. Den Ausbau der erneuerbaren Energien zu regulieren, wäre dann nur noch mit Blick auf die Optimierung des Gesamtsystems nötig. „Strom ist im Vergleich zu fossilen Energieträgern weiterhin überproportional mit Abgaben und Umlagen belastet. Die Ausweitung der Energiewende auf die Sektoren Wärme und Verkehr wird damit erschwert“, sagt Robert Busch, Geschäftsführer des Bundesverbands Neue Energiewirtschaft (bne). Die EEG-Umlage müsse daher anteilig auf den Energieverbrauch für Wärme und Verkehr erhoben werden.
Dass die EEG-Umlage bleibt trotz Ausbau der Erneuerbaren Energien stabil bleibt, begrüßt Julia Verlinden, Energieexpertin und Bundestagsabgeordnete für Bündnis 90/Die Grünen. „Das zeigt: Erneuerbare sind günstig und können weiter zügig ausgebaut werden. Soweit die gute Nachricht. Die schlechte Nachricht lautet: Die Kostenverteilung bleibt ungerecht.“ Das Umlageverfahren müsse daher überarbeitet werden, um Haushalte sowie kleine und mittlere Unternehmen zu entlasten. Darüber hinaus könne ein angemessener Mindestpreis für CO2 zur Entlastung der EEG-Umlage beitragen.
Der Wirtschaftsrat der CDU fordert dagegen „eine Roadmap mit Enddatum für die kostentreibenden Subventionierungen“ von erneuerbaren Energien. Die minimale Senkung der EEG-Umlage für 2018 sei ein Tropfen auf den heißen Stein. Noch immer würden die deutschen Verbraucher aufgrund der überzogenen Steuern und Abgaben mit die höchsten Strompreise in Europa schultern. Der neuen Bundesregierung müsse es gelingen, die Stromkosten wieder wettbewerbsfähig zu gestalten, um den Industriestandort Deutschland nicht nachhaltig zu gefährden.
„Mit unseren Reformen in den letzten Jahren haben wir für stabile Strompreise gesorgt“, meint dagegen Bundeswirtschaftsministerin Brigitte Zypries (SPD). Heute zahle ein Durchschnittshaushalt für Strom in etwa das gleiche wie 2014, und das bei einer deutlich höheren Stromerzeugung insgesamt aus erneuerbaren Energien. Zypries: „Das zeigt, dass wir die Kostendynamik beim Ausbau der Erneuerbaren durchbrochen haben – das ist schon gut, aber daran muss weiter gearbeitet werden.“
„Die Umstellung des Erneuerbare-Energien-Gesetz auf eine durch Ausschreibung festgelegte Vergütung hat auf die Umlage 2018 noch einen sehr geringen Einfluss“, heißt es bei der Bundesnetzagentur. Die im Jahr 2017 erzielten Ausschreibungsergebnisse, die zu einem deutlichen Rückgang der Vergütung für Wind- und Solaranlagen geführt hätten, sowie die durch die Einführung des Netzausbaugebiets geltenden Zubaubeschränkungen für Onshore-Windanlagen in den nördlichen Bundesländern würden erst ab 2019 in größerem Maße wirksam.
„Die Energiewende ist jeden Cent wert, weil sie gefährliche Atomkraft und klimaschädliche fossile Energien überflüssig macht“, sagt Tina Löffelsend, Energieexpertin beim Bund für Umwelt und Naturschutz Deutschland (BUND). Wenn die neue Regierung wirklich etwas für die Entlastung der normalen Stromkunden tun wolle, müsse sie die Subventionen für die energieintensive Industrie bei allen Umlagen und Entgelten endlich massiv zurückfahren. Die künftige Koalition müsse zudem die Steuern und Abgaben auf Energieträger so umschichten, dass sie den CO2-Gehalt widerspiegeln und klimapolitische Lenkungswirkung entfalten können.
Stromanbieter Lichtblick weist unterdessen darauf hin, dass die durchschnittlichen Netzentgelte auch 2018 der größte Kostenblock auf der Stromrechnung der Verbraucher bleiben und mehr als ein Viertel des Strompreises ausmachen. In Summe zahle ein Durchschnittshaushalt mit einem Jahresverbrauch von 3500 Kilowattstunden 2018 im Schnitt 247 Euro für die Netznutzung – gegenüber 238 Euro für die EEG-Umlage.

Taiwan: Gintech, Solartech und Neo Solar Power fusionieren zu UREC

Taiwan: Gintech, Solartech und Neo Solar Power fusionieren zu UREC


Wie bereits Ende vergangener Woche spekuliert, haben die führenden taiwanesischen Solarzellenhersteller Gintech, Neo Solar Power (NSP) und Solartech nun ihre Fusion zu einem einzigen Unternehmen beschlossen. Der Name des neuen Unternehmens ist United Renewable Energy Co., Ltd (UREC). Es soll offiziell Ende Dezember gebildet werden und der Abschluss der Fusion ist für das dritte Quartal 2018 vorgesehen, wie NSP mitteilte. Eine entsprechende Absichtserklärung – die nicht rechtlich bindend ist – haben die Führungsgremien der drei Unternehmen unterzeichnet und darin die Bedingungen für den Zusammenschluss festgelegt.
Interessanterweise wird die Gründung von UREC demnach auf allen drei Firmen basieren, die bei der Führung des neuen Unternehmens gleichberechtigt sein sollen und gleichermaßen davon profitieren. Aus rechtlichen Gründen wird allerdings NSP nach der Fusion mit den beiden anderen Firmen erst einmal bestehen bleiben. Nach Abschluss des Zusammenschlusses solle dann aus NSP UREC werden.
Nach Aussagen von Sam Hong von NSP ist geplant, dass UREC fünf separate Geschäftsbereiche bekommt, die jeweils von verschiedenen Fraktion innerhalb des Unternehmens geführt werden: die Wafer von Gintech, die Zellen und neue Geschäftsmodelle von Solartech und Module sowie das Projektgeschäft von NSP. „Angesichts eines hart umkämpften und zunehmend konzentrierten Marktes sind die Unternehmen der Auffassung, dass sich taiwanesische Hersteller zusammenschließen und so ein Photovoltaik-Flaggschiff-Unternehmen formieren sollten, das einen Wettbewerbsvorteil auf dem Weltmarkt hat und eine blühende und erfolgreich integrierte Plattform aufbauen kann“, heißt es in der Mitteilung von NSP. UREC wolle dabei auch neue Geschäftsmodelle für Taiwans grüne Industrie schaffen. Andere Unternehmen seien eingeladen, sich an der Plattform zu beteiligen, „um die nachhaltige Entwicklung und Weiterentwicklung von Taiwans Solarindustrie zu erleichtern“.
Ein erklärtes Ziel sei es, ein neues vertikal integrierten Hersteller zu schaffen, der eigene Module produziert und in die Kraftwerksentwicklung einsteigt. Zuvor gab es Bedenken innerhalb des Landes, dass die Solarzellhersteller von Chinas Photovoltaik-Hunger zu sehr abhängig und darauf angewiesen seien. In den vergangenen Monaten hatten alle drei Unternehmen erste Schritte zur Modernisierung unternommen sowie als Reaktion auf die raueren Marktbedingungen ihre Geschäftstätigkeiten rationalisiert.
Für Analysten kommt die Ankündigung des Zusammenschlusses nicht überraschend. „Die taiwanesischen Solarzellenfirmen haben immer eng zusammengearbeitet, daher ist der offizielle Zusammenschluss ein wenig überraschender nächster Schritt“, sagt Jenny Chase, Analystin von Bloomberg New Energy Finance (BNEF) auf Anfrage von pv magazine.
Edurne Zoco, Seniormanagerin bei IHS Markit, erklärte, dass die Fusion wahrscheinlich mit dem heimischen Photovoltaik-Markt im Hinterkopf erfolgt sei. „Der Markt für den Solarzellenhandel ist klein und in Taiwan sind die meisten Hersteller angesiedelt“, sagt Zoco. „Sie haben weder eine Machtposition gegenüber den großen Waferproduzenten in China noch gegenüber den Modulherstellern in China oder sonstwo auf der Welt. Wenn die Preise also beginnen zu sinken, sind die Zellhersteller gewöhnlich die ersten, die den Preisdruck von den Modulherstellern zu spüren bekommen. Gleichzeitig haben sie aber nur begrenzte Macht, um niedrigere Preise mit den Waferproduzenten auszuhandeln“, so Zoco. Zudem sei die Kostenstruktur der taiwanesischen Zellhersteller höher. Alle drei Firmen hätten trotz eines global positiven Marktumfeldes im ersten Halbjahr Schwierigkeiten gehabt. „Dies ist ein Indiz für ernste Schwierigkeiten. Die Bündlung der Kräfte könnte helfen, bessere Beschaffungsbedingungen zu erhalten“, sagt Zoco.
IHS Markit erwartet, dass Taiwan bald die Grenze von einem Gigawatt beim jährlichen Photovoltaik-Zubau durchbrechen werde. Ein Unternehmen UREC, dass sich vor allem auf den Heimatmarkt fokussiert, könnte zu diesem Wachstum beitragen. „Allerdings sind NSP und Gintech unter den weltweit zehn größten Zellherstellern und ihre kombinierte Kapazität würde klar den Bedarf des lokalen Marktes übertreffen. So müssten sie weiterhin entweder Solarzellen außerhalb Taiwans verkaufen oder zusätzliche Modulkapazitäten schaffen und diese Module dann ins andere Märkte exportieren“, so Zoco weiter.

Photovoltaik-Ausschreibung: Niedrigster Zuschlagswert bei 4,29 Cent pro Kilowattstunde

Photovoltaik-Ausschreibung: Niedrigster Zuschlagswert bei 4,29 Cent pro Kilowattstunde


Die Photovoltaik-Ausschreibung im Oktober verzeichnet neue Rekordwerte. Erstmals sank der durchschnittliche mengengewichtete Zuschlagswert unter die 5,00 Cent pro Kilowattstunde und lag bei 4,91 Cent pro Kilowattstunde, wie die Bundesnetzagentur am Montag bekanntgab. Das niedrigste erfolgreiche Gebot lag demnach bei 4,29 Cent pro Kilowattstunde, der höchste Zuschlagswert bei 5,06 Cent pro Kilowattstunde. „Gerade große Anlagen können offensichtlich aufgrund von Skaleneffekten relativ kostengünstig errichtet werden“, erklärte Jochen Homann, Präsident der Bundesnetzagentur. Insgesamt seien 20 Zuschläge für Photovoltaik-Projekte mit einer Gesamtleistung von 222 Megawatt vergeben worden.
Drei der erfolgreichen Gebote hätten einen Umfang von mehr als 20 Megawatt gehabt, hieß es weiter. Diese Gebote seien für Solarparks auf sogenannten baulichen Anlagen abgegeben worden. Daneben seien vor allem Gebote auf Acker- und Grünlandflächen in benachteiligten Gebieten erfolgreich gewesen. 12 der 20 Zuschläge mit insgesamt 45 Megawatt seien für Acker- und Grünlandflächen in benachteiligten Gebieten in Bayern vergeben worden. Nach den 18 erfolgreichen Gebote in der Juni-Ausschreibung sei das jährliche Kontingent des Freistaates damit ausgeschöpft gewesen. Vier weitere Gebote, die nach den Preisen noch erfolgreich hätten sein können, erhielten daher keinen Zuschlag mehr, so die Behörde weiter.
Neben Bayern, das wie in der Vorrunde die mit Abstand meisten Zuschläge verbuchte, gingen der Bundesnetzagentur zufolge jeweils zwei Zuschläge nach Sachsen-Anhalt, Sachsen und Mecklenburg-Vorpommern sowie jeweils einer nach Hessen und Baden-Württemberg. Das Ländle hat wie Bayern ebenfalls Acker- und Grünlandflächen in benachteiligten Gebieten freigegeben. Der Erfolg dieser Verordnung ist bislang aber bescheiden mit gerade einmal zwei Zuschlägen in diesem Jahr.
Die Ausschreibung im Oktober war erneut mehrfach überzeichnet. Insgesamt waren 110 Gebote mit einem Gesamtvolumen von 754 Megawatt bei der Bundesnetzagentur eingegangen. Die durchschnittliche Gebotsgröße habe bei 6,9 Megawatt gelegen. Sieben Gebote für Anlagen auf sonstigen baulichen Anlagen hätten bei mehr als 10 Megawatt gelegen – die eigentliche Obergrenze für Photovoltaik-Freiflächenanlagen in Deutschland. Nur drei davon hätten jedoch einen Zuschlag erhalten, so die Bundesnetzagentur weiter. Bis zum 6. November haben die erfolgreichen Bieter nun Zeit, die Zweitsicherheit zu hinterlegen. In rund zwei Wochen will die Bundesnetzagentur ein Hintergrundpapier mit weiteren Informationen zur Photovoltaik-Ausschreibungsrunde im Oktober veröffentlichen.
Bei der Ausschreibung im Juni lag der Durchschnittspreis noch bei 5,66 Cent pro Kilowattstunde. Gegenüber der Runde im Februar war der Zuschlagswert dabei bereits um knapp einen Cent pro Kilowattstunde gesunken – der größte Rückgang zwischen zwei Runden seit Einführung der Ausschreibung für Photovoltaik-Anlagen.
BSW-Solar: Photovoltaik-Ausbauziele deutlich anheben
Der Bundesverband Solarwirtschaft (BSW-Solar) forderte angesichts der Ergebnisse von der neuen Bundesregierung, die Photovoltaik-Ausbauziele zu vervielfachen. Wir können es uns nicht länger leisten, einen Großteil der möglichen Sonnenernte in Deutschland nicht einzuholen. Bei dem erreichten Preisniveau spricht alles für einen deutlich dynamischeren Ausbau der Solarenergie“, sagt BSW-Solar-Hauptgeschäftsführer Carsten Körnig. Ohne eine erhebliche Anhebung rücke das Klimaziel der Bundesregierung in immer weitere Ferne. Die Deckelung der Photovoltaik stamme noch aus einer Zeit, als Solarstrom teuer war. „Nach diesem Preisrutsch gibt es keinen Grund mehr, den Solarenergie-Ausbau weiter zu deckeln“, so Körnig weiter. Nach Erhebungen des Verbandes haben sich allein in den letzten fünf Jahren die Solarstrompreise neu errichteter Solarparks mehr als halbiert. Im Kraftwerksmaßstab erzeugter Solarstrom habe inzwischen in Deutschland die Erzeugungskosten von Strom aus neu errichteten fossil befeuerten Kraftwerken unterschritten.
Neben dem zu geringen Ausbauzielen störten auch Umlagen und Beschränkungen bei der Standortwahl einen dynamischeren Photovoltaik-Ausbau. „Wir müssen endlich die Bremsen lösen! Auf den Dächern von Eigenheimen und Mietshäusern, auf Gewerbe und Industriegebäuden sowie ebenerdig errichteten Solarparks können wir inzwischen preiswert Sonnenenergie gewinnen, die wir für den Strom-, Wärme- und Mobilitätssektor dringend benötigen“, erklärt Körnig. Mit den schnell zu realisierenden Photovoltaik-Anlagen ließe sich das Klima- und Energiewendeziel der Bundesregierung vielleicht noch erreichen. „Nachdem die Photovoltaik nun so günstig geworden ist, wäre es sowohl ökologisch als auch ökonomisch absolut unerklärlich, ihr Potenzial nicht endlich voll auszuschöpfen“, so Körnig weiter.

Belgian logistics company WDP invests another €25 million in solar in the Netherlands

Belgian logistics company WDP invests another €25 million in solar in the Netherlands


Belgian logistics specialist WDP announced it will invest a further €25 million in solar energy projects in the Netherlands. The company said this new investment will enable the deployment of another 25 MW of solar in the country.
All of these projects, which will be developed under the SDE+ incentive scheme for renewable energy projects exceeding 15 kW in size, are scheduled to come online by the end of this year.
“This scheme enables us to achieve a healthy return, which can be compared with the margin we achieve with building rentals,” WDP’s technical manager for sustainability Kris Van der Veken said in 2016.
WDP is responsible not only for the projects design and construction but also for financing and managing the buildings. Apart from offering a solar power installation to its customers, WDP also seeks to lend them support in improving their energy management activities.
This new investment, WDP added, will bring the company’s total installed PV capacity in the Netherlands to 50 MW. The new projects are part of the group’s strategy to boost portfolio sustainability which was launched back in 2015.
“Along with the installations in Belgium and in Romania, WDP is moving towards 85 MW of installed solar capacity in its portfolio. Over the medium-term, WDP will strive for a total PV portfolio of 100 MW,” the company said in its press release.

Ukrainian government considering transition from FITs to auctions

Ukrainian government considering transition from FITs to auctions


The Ukrainian government is discussing whether to replace the current FIT scheme for large-scale solar projects with a new incentive scheme based on auctions, according to information provided to pv magazine by the Ukrainian Association of Renewable Energy (UARE).
The association, however, believes that the proposal, which is being widely discussed in the legislative environment, may be premature as it overestimates the pace of decreasing the technology cost and underestimates the financial effect of project delays.
The UARE is proposing instead to reduce the level of the FIT granted to new large-scale solar projects, because their cost is now decreasing. “Such change can reduce electricity cost without the introduction of a tendering scheme and equal FIT to economically justified levels.” The current FIT for large-scale PV projects connected between 2017 and 2019, on the other hand, is €0.1502 ($0.1775)/kWh.
According to the UARE, the introduction of a tendering system may discourage investors from financing renewable energy projects due to a series of weaknesses in pricing, such as the requirement in a qualitatively and clearly regulated tender procedure and the complexity of forming a tender lot due to the necessity to integrate decisions of different decision-making bodies.
Meanwhile, the Ukrainian power utility Ukrenergo has backed the idea of switching from FITs to auctions. Ukrenergo head Vsevolod Kovalchuk told local press agency Interfax: “The auctions that should be introduced are obligatory. They should concern only large projects. In Ukraine these are project from 10 to 15 MW.”
Ukraine adopted a new law on the electricity market in April. The new law is expected to create more market-oriented relations between all players in the energy market and will enable end consumers to buy power from several providers.
The country’s cumulative installed PV power reached 530.8 at the end of 2016. Local agency SAEE predicts 150 MW of new PV installations for 2017, while the UARE expects between 300 MW and 400 MW.

Portugal announces new solar plan

Portugal announces new solar plan


The Portuguese government is planning to provide a new regulatory framework for the development of large-scale solar projects. The proposal for the new plan is briefly mentioned in the draft state budget law for 2018, which was unveiled by local newspaper Observador.
According to the document, the new solar plan, dubbed Plano Nacional Solar, is expected to identify Portugal’s more suitable areas for the development of utility-scale solar facilities and to support the creation of “a remuneration scheme based on market prices, and without subsidies paid by consumers, through the national electric system.”
The short text dedicated to the new plan does not specify if the new plan will include auctions, as recently requested by the local renewable energy association Apren, or if it will just create the administrative and regulatory framework for large-scale solar plants that sell power at market prices to the local grid in the so-called grid-parity mode, which means that no incentives such as FITs or regulated tariffs ensured by auctions will be granted.
On the other hand, the Portuguese secretary of energy Jorge Seguro Sanches has welcomed yesterday on its twitter account the start of construction of a 46 MW solar park “without incentives” in Orique, Beja district, southern Portugal. “This is one of the PV plants that will be built without subsidies paid by consumers”, said Seguro Sanches in a tweet. More details on how this project is being implemented, however, were not released.
The facility, which is being built by Spanish company Prosolia, is one of several utility-scale PV projects that the Portuguese authorities have recently approved. According to Portuguese financial newspaper Expresso, the Portuguese government has so far approved 14 large-scale PV projects with a combined capacity of 521 MW. These projects, whose aggregate investment is estimated at around €381 million, would be built without additional costs for power consumers, the article reported.
Meanwhile, Portugal reached 474 MW of cumulative registered PV capacity at the end of July 2017, according to the latest data from the DGEG. Not all of this capacity, however, is currently installed or connected to the grid. According to Expresso, the current installed PV power has reached only 291 MW. Most of Portugal’s PV capacity comes from residential and commercial PV installations. Of the registered cumulative PV capacity, in fact, 166.6 MW is represented by microgeneration PV systems (up to 250 kW), while another 110.9 MW comes from mini-generation PV systems (up to 368 kW).

Belarus’s biggest PV plant comes online

Belarus’s biggest PV plant comes online


Belarusian oil and energy group Belorusneft has announced the completion of its 55 MW PV power plant in in the Rechitsa district. According to local government-run press agency Belta, the facility, which relies on 218,000 solar panels provided by Slovenian manufacturer Bisol, is the country’s largest operational PV plant to date.
The project was launched by Belorusneft in August of 2013. Initially, the plant was expected to reach 50 MW capacity, with construction originally due to begin in 2013. These plans, however, were postponed. When the project was resumed, Belorusneft selected German-based meteocontrol GmbH to produce yield reports for a planned PV park in Rechytsa.
According to Belta, there are currently 30 operational PV power plants with a combined capacity of 41 MW in Belarus. In early October, Belarus’ Ministry of Foreign Affairs announced that Irish developer Pure Energy LLC is currently constructing a 109 MW PV power plant in in the Cherikov District, Mogilev Region, in the east of the country.
On top of this, Belarus’ second-largest telecom operator Velkom announced last week that it has powered one if its base station in the Lubansky district of the Minsk region with a 14 kW ground-mounted PV system combined with a lithium-ion storage system. The PV system consists of 55 solar panels mounted on a total area of ​​77 square meters. The storage system, Velkom said, is expected to power the base station for eight hours. A diesel power generator was also installed at the facility, in order to ensure power supply in winter, when there are fewer hours of sun, the company added.
Belarus aims to install 250 MW of PV capacity by 2020.