Gesamtzahl der Seitenaufrufe

Follower

Mittwoch, 20. Dezember 2017

Wind in Europe — How Does It Blow?

Wind in Europe — How Does It Blow?

europe
Europe maintains a healthy market but is looking forward to fresh energy and climate ambitions to add certainty over what the post-2020 landscape will mean for new wind power.
Trade association WindEurope reports that wind power is providing over half of all new generating capacity being installed across the EU member states, with onshore providing the majority.
Some 4.8 GW of new onshore wind was installed in the first half of 2017, with the sector attracting €5.4 billion (US$6.4 billion) in new asset financing over the same period; comparable figures for the offshore sector saw 1.3 GW installed offshore, and €2.9 billion (US$3.4 billion) in financing. WindEurope predicts 2017 will be a record year for installations, with over 10 GW of new onshore wind (3.1 GW offshore) installed across the EU-28.
Of note, European wind energy broke a new daily generation record in October 2017 when it provided 24.6 percent of the EU’s electricity demand. At the end of June 2017, the EU had around 160 GW of wind power capacity (145.5 GW onshore) and eight states with over 5 GW installed.
Looking forward, current trends aren’t expected to alter in the near term and deployment looks set to remain strong through to 2020.
According to its ‘Central Scenario’ to 2020, WindEurope predicts some 37.7 GW new onshore capacity between 2017 and 2020. Averaging 12.6 GW new wind per year (9.4 GW onshore), the scenario predicts the EU-28 reaching over 200 GW of installed wind capacity, providing 16.5 percent of its electricity needs, by 2020. That same scenario posits a total of 8.9 GW new onshore wind capacity (3.3 GW offshore) installed through 2018.
Europe’s market is expected to remain a highly concentrated one, however. Just three countries — Germany, the U.K. and France — account for over 80 percent of the EU’s onshore installations, while deployment through 2018 is set to center around Germany (the market leader), the U.K., France, Spain and the Netherlands.
WindEurope Chief Policy Officer, Pierre Tardieu, stated in mid-2017: “We are on track for a good year in wind capacity installations but growth is driven by a handful of markets. At least 10 EU countries have yet to install a single MW so far this year. On onshore wind, the end of U.K. Renewable Obligation scheme will lead to even greater market concentration in Germany, Spain and France.”
Significant onshore tenders for 2018 include 3,200 MW from Germany (two of which will be technology-neutral) and 1,000 MW from France.
Spain is tipped to “experience radical growth after several years of inactivity,” and is pitched to install 4.1 GW of capacity in the coming years.
WindEurope expects that the U.K. industry will slow its onshore activity from 1.6 GW in 2016 to “almost none” in 2020, as result of a government-led shift towards offshore.
Acknowledging the EU energy objectives for 2020, WindEurope expects existing binding renewable energy targets to have a significant impact on wind installations going forward.
States already meeting goals may slow development, others will hasten to fulfil commitments. Others yet, already having met targets, will continue build out unabated, motivated by longer term climate and energy goals; Denmark and Sweden, for instance, are targeting 100 percent renewable energy by 2035 and 2040 respectively.
While current uncertainty surrounding post-2020 policy brings opaqueness to what deployment will look like further down the line, analyst consensus and trends both indicate that wind will maintain its dominant share in new generating capacity.
In this matter 2018 is an important year, with European institutions engaged in preparing new policy frameworks for the post-2020 period.
WindEurope chief executive Giles Dickson said: “The World Energy Outlook shows wind is on track to become Europe’s leading electricity source soon after 2030.”
Lead image credit: CC0 Creative Commons | Pixabay

18 Solar Wishes for the Holidays

18 Solar Wishes for the Holidays

solar
'Tis the season to…come up with a 2018 solar wish list? Yes, that’s precisely what we have compiled. Some of these wishes are realistic, others are not…like that 120 crayon Crayola pack that never made its way under the tree. Check out our #SolarWishList, and please feel free to add to the list, by utilizing the comment section.
Happy Holidays!
1) Preserve the ITC & throw in an extension, better yet, extend it indefinitely!
2) Minimal tariffs & quotas on cell & module imports (Section 201 Trade Case)
3) Blockchain Investment & development of additional use cases
4) More Solar-Inspired Art & Architecture
5) InterSolar & SPI to be in a beautiful city near me
6) Increased Solar + Storage Deployment (Read more on storage bankability here)
7) Less Solar Degradation (Loss in production due to panel aging) – SunPower’s most recent degradation rates are testing at 0.25 percent annually (Source here).
8) To help reverse Climate Change
9) Cheaper Panels and more efficient ways to install panels
10) Bankability of SRECs & additional rebate programs
11) Improved Community Solar Asset Management & Development of Solar for Low-Income Housing
12) More solar jobs & diversity in the solar industry
13) Reconstruction & Renovation of Puerto Rican Grid to include DERs
14) Significantly more institutional capital in the marketplace lowering the cost of capital
15) Expansion into new markets: States like Illinois, Massachusetts, New Hampshire & others are positioning themselves to make significant progress in solar development in the couple years.
16) Cooperation & teamwork from all stakeholders continuing to promote a sustainable cause
17) 365 days of sunshine a year, throw in some rain and snow when/where needed
18) Tax reform that incentivizes more tax equity in the market
This article was originally published by Sustainable Capital Finance and was republished with permission.

Blockchain, Dapps and More — Five Questions with Jon Creyts

Blockchain, Dapps and More — Five Questions with Jon Creyts

file
Jon Creyts is Managing Director, Rocky Mountain Institute and Board Member, Energy Web Foundation
This article is part of a series of insights from leading smart-grid, clean-energy, and utility experts speaking at gridCONNEXT. Questions asked by Clean Edge managing director and gridCONNEXT co-chair Ron Pernick.
Ron Pernick: Blockchain seems to be everywhere these days. Not only is it the basis for cryptocurrencies like bitcoin, it’s now being touted as the next big thing in peer-to-peer transactions for shopping, government services, and more. Where do you see the greatest opportunity for blockchain in the energy sector?
Jon Creyts: In the near-term, blockchain will quickly help solve trust and integrity issues in markets managed by accounting intermediaries. A great example is the “certificates of origin” market that includes products like unbundled renewable energy certificates. The current system is plagued by high transaction costs, data handoffs, lengthy settlement times, and market opacity, all of which make it hard for buyers to get the attributes they want, and for generators to authenticate sales. These shortcomings can be remedied by a centralized blockchain ledger that incorporates creation, ownership transfer, and retirement into a single, robust data system that is cheap to manage, easily accessible, and cyber-secure.

In the long-term, blockchain automation in peer-to-peer energy trading and dispatch will transform the sector. Using smart contracts, blockchain will be able to clear physical and financial markets at the same time, automating dispatch of load, generation, and storage from both ends of the grid.  Expect blockchain applications to be integrated into EV charging infrastructure in the near-term (they already are used in the Share & Charge network in Europe). Demand response, wholesale market trading, and eventually fully distributed resource market automation will follow. And the changes here are happening fast: blockchain is advancing at the speed of software development, not infrastructure deployment.
Pernick: In November, your organization, the Energy Web Foundation, granted public access to its new test blockchain network so startups, corporations, developers, and others could start developing what you call “energy Dapps.” Can you briefly tell us more about this project and what you hope it will achieve?
Creyts: The Energy Web Foundation is a non-profit committed to developing a global, open-source, cryptographically secure blockchain platform specifically tailored to the needs of the electricity grid. Think of it as a “Linux-like” backbone for energy applications. Our goal is to help standardize the core technology and promote awareness of its ability to solve issues related to operating an increasingly distributed and renewable grid. Programmers can develop distributed applications, or Dapps, on this platform that automate key market opportunities, like creating the certificates of origin market, demand response automation system, or a billing and settlement applications mentioned previously. The Foundation is developing this backbone with input from leading global energy companies like Shell, Engie, Singapore Power, and Sempra working alongside innovative software developers like Parity Technologies, Brainbot, and Slock.it to build a durable and tailored system that specifically addresses the regulatory demands of the energy sector, while supporting an ecosystem of innovation among startups and application developers.
Pernick: In a peer-to-peer network, where multiple parties produce and sell/exchange energy (for example, from solar modules on a rooftop), what is the exact role of the utility? How do you envision the utility being compensated for its role (assuming the electricity is being transmitted across a utility-owned asset)?
Creyts: We think utilities will continue to play a vital role in maintaining, managing, and balancing the grid. In fact, our blockchain uses a special consensus approach that ensures both utilities and regulators are actively validating transactions and verifying that commercial activity is fully compliant to the rules of the market. The utilities will receive compensation for providing the computational power to check and clear this market, at the same time that they also earn on the wires, generation, and other assets they own and operate in the system. The central grid will still be essential in a blockchain-enabled world, we just envision that its capital efficiency will improve dramatically, and that utilities will help make that happen by adjusting and managing a different composite mix of assets to deliver lower cost, more reliable, more resilient, and cleaner energy services.
Pernick: Why should people trust the security claims of blockchain proponents? Personally, with all the cyber intrusions we’ve seen in a range of industries (from credit rating services to major retailers), I’m a bit skeptical. Why should blockchain be any different?
Creyts: Blockchain as a technology contains some of the most secure algorithms protecting data that yet exist, and its public ledger creates a traceable history of actions that cannot be manipulated. That said, every data system has the potential to be corrupted at interfaces with humans and/or devices. This is the reality of living in a digital age. We are trying to combat both by having robust handshake protocols, automated cross-checks, and by adopting an open-source development process where programmers are incentivized to deliberately try to break the system before it ever goes live publicly. Through such approaches, a blockchain enabled network will be considerably more secure than the state-of-the-art systems controlling today’s grid.
Pernick: I’ve read that bitcoin trading platforms currently can only process between three to six transactions per second. This pales in comparison with the thousands of transactions per second that PayPal and Visa can process daily. What type of transaction processing speeds are you projecting will be required for energy sector applications – and what will it take for blockchain networks to support these higher transaction speed requirements?
Creyts: The idea of using a distributed computer with replicated ledgers, while a robust way to maintain data, comes at the expense of speed. It can also lead to sizable network energy consumption, as we have seen in the case of bitcoin. We are working hard to remedy these limitations through a smarter code design purposefully fit to the energy sector. Our design uses a limited set of authorities to approve transactions (including regulators, utilities, and other trustworthy sources) who act as the validators of the blockchain. Restricting replication of the ledger allows our current blockchain to run at approximately 7,500 transactions per second, with a technical development pathway intact that we believe will surpass the million transactions per second hurdle over the coming year.  This is the threshold we consider necessary to animate an “internet of things” electricity market. Hence, while the technology is still early, we see clear promise that this and similar constraints will quickly fall away in the months to come. Blockchain is an important disruptive technology that every regulator and utility executive should be tracking. Doubtless its pace of progress will surprise us all.
Jon Creyts was a panelist at gridCONNEXT 2017 in Washington, D.C. For more information about gridCONNEXT, visit www.gridconnext.com.
This article was originally published by Clean Edge and was republished with permission.
Lead image credit: CC0 Creative Commons | Pixabay

Der BYD-Speicher im Performance-Vergleich: Antworten auf Teilnehmerfragen aus dem Webinar

Der BYD-Speicher im Performance-Vergleich: Antworten auf Teilnehmerfragen aus dem Webinar


Eigenschaften müssen in etlichen verschiedenen Kategorien abgewogen werden, will man das passendste Speichersystem für einen bestimmten Einsatz identifizieren. Dazu gehören, so Florian Blaser von EFT Systems im pv magazine Webinar am 7. Dezember, unter anderem die Sicherheit, die Langlebigkeit, die Effizienz und die Dimensionierung und Zukunftsfähigkeit. EFT Systems hat für Webinar-Initiativpartner BYD den Aftersales Service und die Beratung zum Produkt übernommen.
Bezüglich der Effizienz lassen sich Systeme anhand des System-Performance-Index vergleichen. Der BYD Hochvolt-Batteriespeicher kommt dabei auf 89 Prozent und liegt damit geringfügig über dem der anderen Geräte im pv magazine Speichervergleich. Diese Prozentzahl gibt an, dass der Speicher für einen definierten Standard-Einsatz 89 Prozent der ökonomischen Vorteile auch tatsächlich erwirtschaftet, die theoretisch bei einem verlustfreien und identisch dimensionierten Speicher möglich wären. Beim getesteten System mit zehn Kilowattstunden sind das 1.052 von 1.181 Euro pro Jahr, wie Johannes Weniger von der Arbeitsgruppe Solarspeichersysteme an der HTW-Berlin, der den Index mit seinen Kollegen entwickelt hat, im Webinar vorrechnete. Das ist ein guter Wert.
Im folgenden finden Sie schriftliche Antworten der beiden Experten auf wichtige Fragen und auf solche, die im Webinar nicht mehr behandelt werden konnten.
Hier können Sie die Präsentationen herunterladen und das Webinar nachsehen.

Antworten auf Teilnehmerfragen

Das Speichersystem von BYD B-Box HV 10.2 wurde im Zusammenspiel mit SMA Wechselrichtern getestet. Welche anderen Wechselrichter sind kompatibel?
Florian Blaser: Als nächstes wird die Kompatibilität mit einem Batteriewechselrichter von Kostal bekannt gegeben. Weitere Wechselrichter werden folgen, unter anderem um die 10 Kilowatt Lade- und Entladeleistung den B-Box HV 10.2 zu nutzen. Außerdem können mit der Parallelschaltung deutlich größere Systeme aufgebaut werden. Die Niedervolt (48 Volt) B-BOX ist mit SMA-, Victron-, Goodwe- und Solax-Wechselrichtern kompatibel. Hier lassen sich auch heute schon sehr hohe Leistungsklassen – gerade für gewerbliche Anwendungen – hervorragend abdecken.
Wie würde sich der Einsatz anderer Wechselrichter im System Performance Index auswirken?
Johannes Weniger: Bei der AC-Anbindung des Batteriespeichers beeinflusst sowohl die Wahl des Solarwechselrichters als auch die Wahl des Batterieumrichters die Gesamteffizienz. Ist beispielsweise der Wirkungsgrad des Solarwechselrichters um zwei Prozentpunkte über den gesamten Leistungsbereich verringert, reduziert dies den System Performance Index um rund einen Prozentpunkt (siehe „Vergleich verschiedener Kennzahlen zur Bewertung der energetischen Performance von PV-Batteriesystemen„). Im Vergleich zum Solarwechselrichter fällt der Energiedurchsatz durch den Batterieumrichter in der Regel geringer aus. Dadurch wirkt sich die Änderung des Batterieumrichter-Wirkungsgrads um den gleichen Betrag weniger stark auf den System Performance Index aus.
Gibt es bei Hochvoltspeichern besondere Anforderungen zum Aufstellungsort?
Florian Blaser: Die generellen Anforderungen an den Aufstellungsort unterscheiden sich nicht zwischen Niedervolt und Hochvoltbatterie. Jede B-BOX hat einen Einsatztemperaturbereich von minus 10 Grad Celsius bis plus 50 Grad Celsius, sodass eine sehr hohe Widerstandsfähigkeit und große Flexibilität beim Aufstellungsort gewährleistet sind. Die B-BOX HV hat darüber hinaus sogar eine Schutzklasse von IP55.
Kann solch ein Speicher brennen oder explodieren, besteht ab einer bestimmten Temperatur Explosionsgefahr, und wie kann man im Notfall löschen?
Florian Blaser: Allgemein ist es ein Vorteil von Li-Batterien, dann man Brände mit Wasser löschen könnte. Damit Brände aber grundsätzlich ausgeschlossen sind, gibt es Initiativen wie den Sicherheitsleitfaden Li-Ionen Hausspeicher, in dem Ende 2014 Sicherheitsanforderungen beziehungsweise Schutzziele aufgelistet und zusammengefasst wurden. Dieser Leitfaden stellt eine Empfehlung für die Branche dar und versuchte die Lücke zu schließen, die sich durch die noch fehlenden Normen ergibt. Er stellt die höchsten Sicherheitsanforderungen an das System. Hersteller, die sich an diese im Leitfaden definierten Anforderungen halten stellen sicher, dass selbst bei Fehlern kein unsicherer Zustand auftritt. Die Sicherheitsanforderungen und Normen werden hier auch ständig weiter entwickelt.
Die B-BOX ist bisher einer der wenigen Speichersysteme, welches diesem Leitfaden und allen darin enthaltenen Normen entspricht und dies auch durch extern und unabhängig durchgeführte Tests bestätigen lassen konnte. Damit ist auch die Sicherheit auf Systemebene gewährleistet.
Zudem gilt auch die in der B-BOX verwendete Zellchemie – Lithium-Eisenphosphat – als extrem sicher und als die für Lithium-Speicher insgesamt sicherste Chemie. Die Batteriezellen in der B-BOX werden auch in Elektrofahrzeugen eingesetzt. Dort gelten die Normen der Automobilindustrie, die für ihre besonders hohen Standards bekannt ist. Dazu gehört die Grundvoraussetzung, dass es zu keinerlei Brand oder Explosion kommen kann, was in weiteren zahlreichen Tests und Normen bestätigt wird.
Die B-Box ist modular aufgebaut, wie lange darf man das System mit neuen Modulen erweitern und in wie fern wird die Leistung der neuen Batteriemodule durch die Degradation der älteren Batteriemodule beeinträchtigt? Wieviel Jahre garantiert BYD die Nachrüstmöglichkeit der Batteriemodule?
Florian Blaser: Die B-BOX kann jederzeit erweitert werden. Das war einer der Kernpunkte aus dem Feedback vom Markt, das bei der Entwicklung berücksichtigt wurde. Denn zuvor haben viele Anwender den Kauf eines Speichers gescheut, da sie sich nicht sicher waren, welche Größe sie in Zukunft (zum Beispiel beim Einbinden neuer Energiesysteme oder eines Elektrofahrzeugs) benötigen würden.
Die Leistung ist von der späteren Erweiterung unabhängig – hier ist immer die volle Leistung einer Konfiguration abrufbar. Jedoch muss man bei der Kapazität darauf achten, ob durch eine Serienschaltung oder eine Parallelschaltung erweitert wird. Bei unseren Batterien kann in Parallelschaltung (bei den 48 Volt-Batterien oder mehreren HV-Türmen) jederzeit erweitert werden und es ist immer die volle Kapazität – vom neuen und alten Modul – nutzbar. In Serienschaltung (innerhalb eines HV Turmes) hätte das neue Modul die gleiche Kapazität wie die alten Module – es kann aber auch jederzeit erweitert werden. Hierbei wird BYD die Batteriemodule für mindestens 10 Jahre weiter produzieren, um auch die Verfügbarkeit dieser für eine Nachrüstung zu gewährleisten.
Speicher unterscheiden sich wie gehört nicht nur bezüglich der Effizienz. Ist die richtige Vorgehensweise, zuerst das passende relevante System zu ermitteln und dann die in Betracht kommenden Systeme mit ähnlicher Leistung und Kapazität über den System Performance Index zu vergleichen?
Johannes Weniger: In der Tat sollte man sich zunächst mit der Frage auseinandersetzen, welche Systemkonfiguration zu der Photovoltaik-Anlage und zum eigenen Stromverbrauch passt. Hilfreich bei der Suche nach der geeigneten Speicherkapazität sind dabei Onlinetools wie zum Beispiel der Unabhängigkeitsrechner. Steht die gewünschte Speichergröße fest, kann man sich im Anschluss auf die Suche nach einem effizienten System machen. Der System Performance Index erleichtert den Effizienzvergleich von verschiedenen Systemen, da er alle Effizienzparameter in einer Kennzahl vereint.
Ein Argument für Hochvolt-Batteriespeicher ist die im Vergleich zu 48-Volt-Systemen theoretisch deutlich bessere Effizienz. Warum ist die Performance-Differenz in der Testmessung dann vergleichsweise gering?
Johannes Weniger: Die bessere Umwandlungseffizienz der Leistungselektronik bei höherer Batteriespannung lässt sich auch in den Testergebnissen nachweisen: Die Umwandlungsverluste des Hochvolt-Batterieumrichters fallen im Vergleich zum Niedervolt-Batterieumrichter um rund 20 Prozent geringer aus. Dieser Effizienzvorteil geht bei dem konkreten Hochvolt-System (BYD B-Box H 10.2 und SMA Sunny Boy Storage 2.5) jedoch durch erhöhte Einbußen aufgrund der Begrenzung der Lade- und Entladeleistung auf 2,5 kW wieder verloren. Bei Batterieumrichtern mit höherer Leistung sollte der Effizienzvorteil der Hochvolt-Systemlösung demnach noch größer ausfallen.
Eigentlich müsst ja statt der zehn-Kilowattstunden-Batterie eine B Box H 6.4 mit 6,4 Kilowattstunden im Effizienzvergleich mit den Niedervoltsystemen gemessen werden, die auch ungefähr diese Größe haben. Das kleinere System hat weniger in Reihe geschaltete Batteriemodule als die zehn-Kilowattstunden-Variante und daher eine niedrigere Spannung. Dadurch würde das System doch deutlich schwächer im Effizienzvergleich ausfallen, oder?
Johannes Weniger: Im Webinar wurden die Testergebnisse für das Hochvolt-System sowohl mit 10 Kilowattstunden als auch mit 6,4 Kilowattstunden vorgestellt: Der System Performance Index liegt bei 89,0 Prozent beziehungsweise bei 89,2 Prozent. Für diese Differenz sind verschiedene Effekte verantwortlich. Einerseits verbessert sich das Verhältnis der maximalen Batterieumrichterleistung zur Speicherkapazität von 0,25 kW/kWh (10-Kilowattstunden-System) auf 0,4 kW/kWh (6,4- Kilowattstunden-System). Das macht sich in geringeren Dimensionierungsverlusten des Batterieumrichters bemerkbar. Andererseits hat die niedrigere Batteriespannung beim kleineren System erwartungsgemäß höhere Umwandlungsverluste im Batterieumrichter zur Folge.
Der System Performance Index des Hochvolt-Systems (6,4 kWh) liegt mit 89,2 Prozent um 0,9 Prozentpunkte über den Ergebnissen der Niedervolt-Systemlösung (4,4 Kilowattstunden) (siehe pv magazine Speichervergleich). Dieser Performance-Unterschied ist letztendlich auch auf die geringeren Leerlauf- und Standby-Verluste des Hochvolt-Batterieumrichters zurückzuführen.
Welche Möglichkeiten gibt es, den Speicher ein- und dreiphasig zu nutzen?
Florian Blaser: Die Batterie an sich kann beides ohne Probleme unterstützen. Hier kommt es auf die Leistungselektronik, also den Wechselrichter an, welcher verwendet wird. Die B-BOX HV kann zum Beispiel mit SMA einphasig und mit Kostal 3-phasig eingesetzt werden.
Wann wäre es aus Ihrer Sicht sinnvoll, Ihre Batterie dreiphasig einzubinden? Das ist ja eigentlich nicht einmal in Kombination mit Wärmepumpen relevant, da der Stromverbrauch über alle Phasen saldierend abgerechnet wird und es daher selbst dann als Eigenverbrauch zählt, wenn der Speicher auf der einen Phase in das Netz einspeist und die Wärmepumpte auf der anderen Phase Strom zieht.
Florian Blaser: Dies lässt sich pauschal schlecht sagen und muss im Einzelfall geprüft werden. Ab einer gewissen Leistung wird ein 3-phasiges System nötig, da man zunächst sicherstellen muss, dass die Phasenschieflast eingehalten wird. Hier darf in Deutschland höchstens eine Schieflast von 4,6 kVA pro Phase auftreten. Im Privathaushalt reichen jedoch meistens Wechselrichter mit einer geringeren Leistung aus, sodass hier in den meisten Fällen auch 1-phasige Geräte eingesetzt werden können.
Wiese geben Sie keine Zyklenlebensdauer an?
Florian Blaser: Diese Größe ist – wie früher die Effizienz – nicht vergleichbar genormt und daher wenig bis gar nicht aussagekräftig. Wir wissen, dass die Zyklenlebensdauer oft für Berechnungen und Auslegungen verwendet wird. Wir halten dies jedoch für falsch, da man Speichersysteme mit diesem Parameter aktuell nicht vergleichen kann.
Die Lebensdauer hängt außerdem auch von der kalendarischen Lebensdauer des Speichers ab. Es ist also ein komplexes Zusammenspiel von Zyklenlebensdauer und kalendarischer Lebensdauer, wobei die Zyklenlebensdauer alleine keinen wirklichen Mehrwert bringt.
Bei der Zyklenlebensdauer beziehungsweise generellen Lebensdauer müssen wir uns keineswegs verstecken. Das Besondere an BYD ist, dass BYD die extrem lange Lebensdauer von den eingesetzten Lithium-Eisenphosphat Batteriezellen auch schon an praktischen Anwendungen zeigen und nachweisen kann. Denn diese sind beispielsweise auch in Elektrofahrzeugen von BYD bereits viele Jahre im Einsatz und können dort extrem hohe Laufleistungen nachweisen.
Wir könnten also ebenfalls sehr hohe Zyklenzahlen auf die Datenblätter schreiben, finden diese Angabe aber bei der aktuellen Marktlage eher verwirrend für den Kunden und in keiner Weise hilfreich.
Welche Art der Garantie geben Sie (Zeitwertersatz- oder Vollkostengarantie)?
Florian Blaser: BYD garantiert einen funktionsfähigen Batteriespeicher für 10 Jahre oder den Anfangswert der Batterie. Als funktionsfähiger Speicher gilt ein Gerät, das noch mehr 80 Prozent der angegebenen nutzbaren Kapazität besitzt.
Welches Absatzziel hat BYD für seine Hochvolt-Batteriespeicher nächstes Jahr in Deutschland, welches für die Niedervoltsysteme?
Florian Blaser: BYD strebt einen Marktanteil von rund 15 Prozent in Deutschland an. Dabei rechnen wir mit einem Anteil an unserer verkauften Stückzahl von etwa einem Drittel an Niedervolt-Systemen und zwei Dritteln an Hochvolt-Batteriespeichern.
Wir hören in letzter Zeit immer wieder, durch das Wachstum bei der Elektromobilität gäbe es Versorgungsengpässe bei den stationären Speichern. Wie wirkt sich das auf Lieferbarkeit und Verfügbarkeit des Hochvolt-Speichers aus?
Florian Blaser: BYD ist Zellhersteller und stellt somit die Batteriezellen, die in der B-BOX eingesetzt werden, selbst her. Damit ist BYD auch nicht auf Zulieferer angewiesen und kann sich selbst versorgen. Das Wachstum in der Elektromobilität sowie bei stationären Speichern ist hierbei eingeplant und wird durch neue Zellfabriken abgefangen. Außerdem wird bei Versorgungsengpässen häufig auf die Knappheit und Problematik des Rohstoffs Kobalt verwiesen. In den Lithium Eisenphosphat Batteriezellen, welche in der B-BOX eingesetzt werden, wird aber überhaupt kein Kobalt eingesetzt. Damit entgehen wir der Problematik mit diesem (auch ansonsten problematischen) Rohstoff.

Geschäftsbetrieb der insolventen Phoenix Solar geht vorläufig weiter

Geschäftsbetrieb der insolventen Phoenix Solar geht vorläufig weiter


Das Amtsgericht München hat Rechtsanwalt Michael Jaffé zum vorläufigen Insolvenzverwalter der insolventen Phoenix Solar bestellt. Wie die Kanzlei Jaffé Rechtsanwälte Insolvenzverwalter am Montag mitteilte, soll der Anwalt nun das vorhandene Vermögen im Interesse der Gläubiger sichern und die Möglichkeiten einer Fortführung beziehungsweise einer übertragenden Sanierung prüfen.
„Wir stehen noch ganz am Anfang des Prozesses. Es ist deshalb noch zu früh, eine Aussage über die Erfolgsaussichten abzugeben“, sagte Jaffé am Montag vor den Phoenix Solar-Mitarbeiter am Standort Sulzemoos. „Wir müssen jetzt mit Hochdruck daran arbeiten, dass das Unternehmen weiter funktionsfähig bleibt. Dazu brauchen wir die Unterstützung von Banken und Kunden“, so Michael Jaffé in einer ersten Einschätzung.
Auf der Mitarbeiterversammlung informierte der Anwalt die Belegschaft über die ersten Schritte: Die Mitarbeiter würden demnach „schnellstmöglich das ihnen zustehende Insolvenzgeld erhalten“. Derzeit werde eine Vorfinanzierung in Abstimmung mit der Agentur für Arbeit vorbereitet. Bis einschließlich November hätten die Mitarbeiter noch ihre regulären Gehälter erhalten.
Der Geschäftsbetrieb bei Phoenix Solar soll zunächst weitestgehend fortgeführt werden. Vorstand und Insolvenzverwalter bemühen sich demnach derzeit darum, dass die laufenden Projekte (vorwiegend im asiatisch-pazifischen Raum) weiter wie geplant abgearbeitet werden. Mit eigenen Tochtergesellschaften in zehn Ländern auf drei Kontinenten und rund 120 festangestellten Mitarbeitern baut das Unternehmen Photovoltaik-Großkraftwerke und hat 2016 einen Umsatz von rund 140 Millionen Euro erzielt.
Indes seien die ersten Gespräche mit potenziellen Investoren bereits angelaufen, „einige Interessenten haben sich bereits gemeldet“, sagte Finanzvorstand Manfred Hochleitner vor den Mitarbeitern in Sulzemoos. Wie lange diese Gespräche dauern ist nach jetzigem Stand noch offen, wie pv magazine auf Nachfrage erfährt. Die Gespräche über einzelne Landesgesellschaften sollen jedoch so schnell wie möglich zu einem Ergebnis führen. Bis Ende Februar erhalten die Mitarbeiter demnach noch das Insolvenzgeld.
Anlass der Insolvenzanmeldung sind Forderungen eines Kunden der US-Tochter von Phoenix Solar über rund acht Millionen Dollar, durch die die Muttergesellschaft in Deutschland mit Erstattungsansprüchen konfrontiert ist. Dies führte zur Zahlungsunfähigkeit und zwang den Vorstand, am 13. Dezember Insolvenz anzumelden.
Versuche der Unternehmensführung, mit dem erwähnten US-Kunden und dem Bankenkonsortium in Deutschland zu einer Lösung zu kommen, blieben erfolglos. Per Ende September 2017 verfügte Phoenix Solar laut Mitteilung noch über einen Finanzmittelbestand von 2,2 Millionen Euro. Mit der Bestellung des Insolfenzverwalters wurde nun auch ein vorläufiger Gläubigerausschuss eingesetzt, dem Vertreter der wichtigsten Gläubigergruppen angehören.

Bürgerwerke erreichen 500.000 Euro beim Crowdfunding

Bürgerwerke erreichen 500.000 Euro beim Crowdfunding


Über 150 Menschen haben als Crowdinvestoren 500.000 Euro in die Bürgerwerke investiert. Wie das Unternehmen am Montag mitteilte,  ist damit das Finanzierungsziel neun Wochen nach dem Start des Crowdfundings erreicht. Nach Volumen sei dies eine der größten deutschen Crowdfunding-Kampagnen für junge Sozialunternehmen, heißt es vom Unternehmen. Die Investoren erhalten in Form von Nachrangdarlehen einen Zins von jährlich 5,25 Prozent bei einer Laufzeit von fünf Jahren und endfälliger Tilgung.
Das Geld aus dem erfolgreichen Crowdfunding wollen die Bürgerwerke nach eigenen Angaben in das weitere Wachstum investieren. Geplant ist demnach, für das Bürgerwerke-Netzwerk neue Energiegenossenschaften zu gewinnen und auf der anderen Seite über regionale Aktionen und über Online-Marketing bundesweit neue Kunden zu gewinnen.
„Wir werden das Geld sowohl für neue Mitarbeiter als auch für die weitere Produktentwicklung einsetzen“, sagt auf Nachfrage von pv magazine Christopher Holzem, Teamleiter der Energiewende-Botschafter bei den Bürgerwerken. Das Unternehmen bietet seinen Energiegenossenschaften Angebote etwa für den Bereich Mieterstrom, Elektromobilität oder für IT-Lösung bei der Mitglieder-Betreuung. Durch den Zusammenschluss vieler überwiegend Solargenossenschaften profitierten die einzelnen Mitglieder dabei unter anderem durch Mengenrabatten bei neuen Investitionen, sagt Holzem.
Die Bürgerwerke sind ein Zusammenschluss von 76 Bürgerenergiegenossenschaften aus ganz Deutschland. 12.000 Bürger sind laut Unternehmen in den Genossenschaften insgesamt organisiert.

Indien: Ausschreibung für 10 Gigawatt schwimmende Photovoltaik-Anlagen

Indien: Ausschreibung für 10 Gigawatt schwimmende Photovoltaik-Anlagen


Die indische Solar Energy Corporation (SECI) veröffentlichte am Montag eine Photovoltaik-Ausschreibung mit einer Gesamtkapazität von insgesamt zehn Gigawatt für schwimmende Photovoltaik-Kraftwerke. Ziel ist es, diesen noch wenig entwickelten Teil des Solarsektors in den nächsten drei Jahren anzukurbeln.
Laut dem jetzt veröffentlichten Plan will die Regierungsbehörde zunächst Interessenbekundungen von Photovoltaik-Entwicklern einholen, die sich für entsprechende Projekte im Rahmen der Ausschreibung bewerben möchten. Die Unternehmen haben dafür bis zum 5. Januar 2018 Zeit. Die Interessenbekundungen der Projektentwickler will SECI als Grundlage einer Machbarkeitsstudie nutzen, die aufzeigt, wo schwimmende Solaranlagen am besten installiert werden sollten.
Gewinner der Ausschreibung müssen die schwimmenden Parks dann an vorher festgelegten Standorten aufbauen und betreiben. Sie sollen dabei langfristige Stromabnahmeverträge (PPA) erhalten.
Indiens schwimmende Solarlandschaft beginnt sich bereits jetzt zu entwickeln. Im Sommer startete ein schwimmendes Photovoltaik-Projekt mit zwei Megawatt Leistung in Andhra Pradesh, und schon vergangenes Jahr wurden eine Reihe von Projektplänen vorgestellt. So fördert die deutsche Kreditanstalt für Wiederaufbau zwei Pilotanlagen, die National Hydroelectric Power Corporation (NHPC) wiederum enthüllte Pläne für den Bau einer 600 Megawatt-Solaranlage an einem Staudamm in Maharashtra.
Der erste schwimmende Solarpark Indiens mit einer Leistung von zehn Kilowatt wurde 2015 fertiggestellt. Vikram Solar hatte die Anlage gebaut, um die Machbarkeit einer solchen Technologie zu prüfen.

EU genehmigt Ausnahmeregeln der EEG-Umlage beim Eigenverbrauch

EU genehmigt Ausnahmeregeln der EEG-Umlage beim Eigenverbrauch


Die Europäische Kommission hat heute die vollständige Befreiung von der Umlage nach Erneuerbaren Energien Gesetz für Bestandsanlagen bei der Eigenversorgung beihilferechtlich genehmigt. Das geht aus einer Mitteilung des Bundeswirtschaftsministeriums von heute hervor. Demnach wäre die bisherige Genehmigung Ende des Jahres ausgelaufen, so dass ein neues Genehmigungsverfahren erforderlich gewesen sei.
Laut den Regelungen fallen nach einer Modernisierung bei Bestandsanlagen nur 20 Prozent der EEG-Umlage an, bei einer Umstellung von Kohle auf klimafreundlichere Energieträger bleibt es bei der vollständigen Befreiung von der EEG-Umlage.
Daneben genehmigte die Kommission auch die Entlastung für Neuanlagen, die Strom aus Erneuerbaren Energien erzeugen. Hiervon profitieren vor allem viele Photovoltaik-Anlagen auf Gebäuden. Photovoltaikanlagen mit einer Leistung unter zehn Kilowatt und einem Eigenverbrauch von höchstens zehn Megawattstunden pro Jahr beim Eigenverbrau können damit also auch aus Sicht der EU weiterhin von der EEG-Umlage befreit sein.
Die Regelung für die Begrenzung der EEG-Umlage auf 40 Prozent für KWK-Neuanlagen ist laut Wirtschaftsministerium weiterhin Gesprächsthema zwischen der Bundesregierung und der Europäischen Kommission. Nach einer Einigung mit Brüssel soll die EEG-Umlagenbegrenzung für neue KWK-Eigenversorgungsanlagen im kommenden Jahr gesetzlich neu geregelt und der Europäischen Kommission zügig zur Genehmigung vorgelegt werden.

EU-Ministerrat betont Recht auf Eigenerzeugung

EU-Ministerrat betont Recht auf Eigenerzeugung


Am 18. Dezember hat der Europäische Ministerrat seine Verhandlungsposition gegenüber Parlament und Komission für das sogenannte Winterpaket festgelegt, mit dem die EU einen Teil ihrer Klima- und Energiepolitik umsetzen will. Er hat unter anderem die Vorschläge des sogenannten EU-Winterpakets zur Selbstversorgung mit eigenen Photovoltaik-Anlagen sowie zu Ökostrom-Genossenschaften gebilligt. Diese seien im Entwurf „nun klar festgelegt“, heißt es in der Presseerklärung. Prosumer sollten künftig unter anderem von vereinfachten Meldeverfahren für kleine Anlagen profitieren
Mit dem Winterpaket, das die EU Komission erarbeitet hat, will die EU ihre zukünftige Klima- und Energiepolitik festlegen. Im Ministerrat sind die Vertreter der Mitgliedsländer versammelt, so dass die unterschiedlichen Interessen innerhalb der EU direkt aufeinandertreffen. Eine Gruppe von Ländern, unter anderem Frankreich, Italien und Deutschland, habe ambitionierteres Vorgehen gefordert und konnte sich teilweise durchsetzen, so Aurélie Beauvais, Policy Director bei dem europäischen Solarverband Solar Power Europe.
Bezüglich der Klimaziele, die mit 27 Prozent CO2-Reduktion bis 2030 gegenüber den bisher für 2020 festgelegten Zielen nicht besonders engagiert sind, wollte die Gruppe mehr Kontrollmöglichkeiten für die EU Komission erreichen. Nach der gestrigen Tagung werden Etappenziele nun nicht nur für 2023 (24 Prozent) und 2025 (40 Prozent), sondern auch für 2027 (60 Prozent) festgelegt. Allerdings hat der Rat abgelehnt, dass die Komission quantitative Empfehlungen gegenüber einzelnen Mitgliedsländern aussprechen kann, wenn sie ihre Ziele nicht erreichen. Carsten Pfeiffer, Leiter Politik und Strategie beim Bundesverband Erneuerbare Energie, hatte dies bereits Mitte des Jahres angesichts der seiner Ansicht nach ohnehin niedrigen Erneuerbaren-Zielen im Gespräch mit pv magazine kritisiert. „Es ist damit wenig Druck auf die Mitgliedsländer zu erwarten“, sagte Pfeiffer.
Auch ein anderer Diskussionspunkt, bei dem sich die Gruppe teilweise durchgesetzt hat, ist für die Solarbranche relevant. Das Winterpaket sieht vor, dass Mitgliedstaaten Kraftwerke über einen Kapazitätsmechanismus finanzieren können. Ein wichtiges vom Rat nun akzeptiertes Element ist, dass neue Anlagen ab dem Jahr 2025 nur dann für den Kapazitätsmechanismus zugelassen sein sollen, wenn ihre Emissionen bei unter 550 Gramm CO2 pro Kilowattstunde oder unter 700 Kilogramm CO2 pro Kilowatt pro Jahr liegen. Ab 2030 sollen diese Grenzen auch für existierende Kraftwerke gelten. Kohlekraftwerke ohne Kraft-Wärme-Kopplung reißen diese Grenze bei weitem. Damit erschwert das den Betrieb der Kohlekraftwerke, wenn auch zu einem vergleichsweise späten Zeitpunkt, was der Energiewende und den Solarstromausbau hilft. „Was vor zwölf Monaten unerreichbar erschien, wird jetzt denkbar – ein CO2-Kriterium für den Kapazitätsmechanismus“, so Aurélie Beauvais. Der vom Rat gebilligte Entwurf sei zwar schwächer als der von der Komission vorgelegte, aber immerhin. „Wir arbeiten jedoch daran, dass das Original der Komission die Messlatte für eine Einigung bleibt.“
Der BDEW macht postwendend klar, dass er auf der anderen Seite steht. Dass selbst moderne Kohlekraftwerke vom Kapazitätsmarkt ausgeschlossen werden „wäre ein klarer Verstoß gegen den Grundsatz der Technologieneutralität, der in einem Kapazitätsmarkt gelten muss“, heißt es. Sein Ziel sei ausschließlich, Versorgungssicherheit zu garantieren. „Die CO2-Minderung muss anderen Mechanismen – insbesondere dem Emissions-Zertifikatehandel – vorbehalten sein.“
Für Deutschland ist auch der Disput über die einheitliche Strompreiszone relevant. Danach gilt in ganz Deutschland eine einheitliche Preiszone für den Stromhandel. Andere EU-Länder beklagen sich darüber, das nicht genügend Leitungen innerhalb Deutschlands zur Verfügung stünden und daher Strom über Nachbarländer geführt werde. Das ließe sich, außer durch mehr Leitungen, nur durch einen anderen Zuschnitt der Preiszonen besser regeln, sprich durch zwei getrennte Preiszonen in Deutschland.
Zur Verhandlung standen etliche weitere Themen, wie flexible Strompreise, die Rolle von Smart-Metern und Rahmenbedingungen für Batteriespeicher. Die Speicherbranche dürfte sich über den Ansatz freuen, nach dem der Rat auch dafür ist, dass es Verteilnetzbetreibern und Übertragungsnetzbetreibern in Zukunft unter bestimmten Umständen erlaubt sein solle, Energiespeicher zu betreiben.
Insgesamt zieht Solar Power Europe ein positives Resume. Der Rat habe erkannt, dass die Strommärkte offener, transparenter und flexibler werden müssen. Dies sei ein entscheidender Schritt hin zu einem zukunftssicheren Strommarktdesign, das mehr erneuerbare Energien und dezentrale Energielösungen integriert. „Wir freuen uns, dass der Rat die Bedeutung des Rechts auf selbsterzeugten Strom erkannt hat“, sagt Solarpower Europe-CEO James Watson gegenüber pv magazine. Das sei ein großer Schritt in Richtung einer von der Kommission so vorgesehenen Energiewende, in dessen Zentrum der Verbraucher steht. Dies werde auch dadurch deutlich, dass die Bestimmungen beibehalten werden sollen, mit denen unverhältnismäßig hohe Gebühren für Eigenversorger unterbunden werden sollen.

Das Winterpaket ist Teil des Clean Energy Package zur Erreichung der EU Klima- und Energieziele. Die Mitgliedsstaaten sollen künftig ihre Energie- und Klimapläne mit ihren Zielen und Maßnahmen vorlegen, zunächst für die Jahre 2021 bis 2030. Die Pläne werden dann alle zehn Jahre erneuert. Um einen Anteil erneuerbarer Energien auf 27 Prozent bis 2030 zu erreichen, sollen Mitgliedsstaaten und EU bestimmte Etappenziele auf dem Weg dorthin erreichen. Die Mitgliedsstaaten sollen dabei alle zwei Jahre einen Energie- und Klimafortschrittsbericht vorlegen.
Die EU-Kommission hatte das Clean Energy Package November 2016 vorgelegt. Ausschüsse des Europäischen Parlaments haben am 7. Dezember 2017 den Bericht angenommen. Er soll während der Plenarsitzung des Parlaments im Januar 2018 zur Abstimmung gestellt werden.

Eni and Sonatrach to develop more solar projects in Algeria

Eni and Sonatrach to develop more solar projects in Algeria


Italy’s oil giant Eni and Algeria’s Sonatrach, a state-owned company specializing in the exploitation of hydrocarbon resources, announced they are expanding their joint activities in the solar energy sector.
In particular, the two companies are now identifying areas in which to build solar power plants in Sonatrach’s production sites in Algeria. The first step of this expanded cooperation will be the realization of feasibility studies in the selected sites, and the elaboration of a business model for the projects. No more details were provided on individual projects and their combined capacity.
“Today we confirm our engagement in promoting a sustainable development in Algeria, as an integral part of our energy transition strategy aimed at increasing the use of energy from renewable sources. We also want to intensify our partnership with Sonatrach with new projects, in Algeria as well as abroad,” said Eni CEO, Claudio Descalzi.
The two companies are currently working on a 10 MW PV in Ouargla, the capital of Ouargla Province, in the Sahara Desert in southern Algeria. The project, announced in May, is expected to provide with power the Bir Rebaa North (BRN) oil field, which is operated by Sonatrach unit Groupemen Sonatrach Agip (GSA).
It is scheduled for completion in December 2017. Eni said that approximately 32,000 solar panels will be used for the plant, without providing additional technical or financial details.
The two companies signed a preliminary strategic agreement on renewables in September, which included the 10 MW PV project in Ouargla.
Sonatrach, on the other hand, is expected play a central role in the tender for 4 GW of solar capacity recently announced by the Algerian government.
To date, however, the tender has not been issued, and the delay of its launching is mainly due to negotiations with the Algerian renewable energy sector, which fears that the size of the tendered projects may lead to the exclusion of local players.

Floating electrolyzer for PV powered hydrogen

Floating electrolyzer for PV powered hydrogen


A team of researchers has developed a standalone electrolysis device, which can float on open water, and produce hydrogen fuel from water and sunlight.
The device’s key innovation is its method for separating hydrogen from oxygen. Most electrolyzers rely on costly membrane materials to achieve this. The device developed by Columbia, however, utilizes an electron configuration which allows for the gases to be separated and collected using only the buoyancy of bubbles in water.
“The simplicity of our PV electrolyzer architecture – without a membrane or pumps – makes our design particularly attractive for its application to seawater electrolysis, thanks to its potential for low cost and higher durability compared to current devices,” says Daniel Esposito, Assistant Professor of Chemical Engineering at Columbia. “We believe that our prototype is the first demonstration of a practical, membraneless floating PV electroylzer, and that it could inspire large-scale ‘solar fuel rigs’.”
The majority of current water electrolyzers are not suitable for seawater, as the membrane is quickly broken down by impurities in the seawater, so Columbia’s device could allow for a new type of offshore generation.
The device, described in the study ‘Floating Membraneless PV-Electrolyzer Based on Buoyancy-Driven Product Separation’, published in the international journal of hydrogen energy, utilizes a novel electrode setup, where asymmetrical electrodes are coated on one side with a catalyst. Bubbles of hydrogen and oxygen appear on the electrode, and float the surface once large enough.
The team now plans to focus in improving the efficiency of the device for operation at sea, and creating a modular design that can be easily scaled up.

Phoenix Solar’s newly appointed insolvency administrator in talks with potential investors

Phoenix Solar’s newly appointed insolvency administrator in talks with potential investors


The German district court of Munich has appointed lawyer Michael Jaffé as provisional insolvency administrator of insolvent PV project developer, Phoenix Solar.
According to a statement released by the law firm Jaffé Rechtsanwälte on Monday, Jaffé should now secure the existing assets in the interest of creditors and examine the possibility of continuing the business, or restructuring it.
“We are still at the very beginning of the process. It is too early to make a statement about the prospects of success, “said Jaffé on Monday, talking to Phoenix Solar employees at the Sulzemoos site.
“We now have to work hard to keep the company working. For this we need the support of banks and customers,” he added.
At the employee meeting, the lawyer informed the workforce of the first steps. They are expected to receive the insolvency money due to them “as quickly as possible”. The company’s employees received their regular salaries until November.
The board and the insolvency administrator are currently working to ensure that ongoing projects – mainly in the Asia-Pacific region – continue to be developed as planned. With its own subsidiaries in ten countries on three continents, and around 120 permanent employees, the company is building large-scale photovoltaic power plants. It achieved sales of around €140 million in 2016.
Meanwhile, first talks with potential investors have already started. “Some interested parties have already show their interest,” CFO Manfred Hochleitner told employees in Sulzemoos.
How long these talks will be held, however, is still difficult to say, as pv magazine has learnt from a spokesperson from Jaffé Rechtsanwälte. He added that the company’s employees will continue to receive insolvency money until the end of February.
The bankruptcy filing on December 13 became necessary after U.S. subsidiary, Phoenix Solar Inc. received a payment request from an unidentified customer to the tune of US$8 million. Attempts by management to come to a solution with the U.S. customer and the bank consortium in Germany were unsuccessful.
As of the end of September 2017, Phoenix Solar reported a cash position of €2.2 million. With the appointment of the insolvency administrator, a provisional committee of creditors has now been set up to include representatives of the most important groups of creditors.

Vattenfall’s Dutch unit Nuon to build 200 MW of PV

Vattenfall’s Dutch unit Nuon to build 200 MW of PV


Dutch power provider, Nuon has a 200 MW PV project pipeline in the Netherlands, according to a press release from its parent company, Sweden’s electric utility, Vattenfall.
Nuon, which has specialized in the development of wind power projects over the past years, said that solar projects can be implemented more quickly than wind projects, and that a co-location of both technologies is “many times a great idea”.
No details, however, were provided on the 200 MW solar project pipeline. It is very likely, however, that these projects are currently being developed under Netherlands’ SDE+ program for large-scale renewable energy projects.
The company also said it has secured a permit to deploy around 12 MW of storage capacity in the Netherlands, without providing additional information.
Nuon Head of Large-scale Solar Power, Margit Deimel, added that she is also seeking opportunities for potential projects in Germany, the U.K., Denmark, Sweden and adjacent countries.
“The first thing I do is establish whether there is potential for us to work on projects with our existing contacts, and I put together a potential business case for each country. Suffice to say that this varies from one country to another,” Deimel said.
Nuon’s Business Unit Solar & Batteries is currently operating in three different segments in the Dutch solar and renewable energy market: large-scale solar, decentralised solar (B2B customers with large roofs) and batteries (large-scale and decentralised on B2B customer premises).
Nuon announced a plan to combine solar projects with wind power facilities in the Netherlands in February. At the time, the company said that its future solar parks would be able to utilize the infrastructure of the wind farms, which should significantly reduce project costs.
Vattenfall, on the other hand, announced a plan to invest in solar and renewables in late March. The 28 billion SEK (US$3.16 billion) plan for growth investments, which will be mainly devoted to renewable energies, includes 17 billion SEK ($1.92 billion) for onshore and offshore wind power and 2 billion SEK ($226.3 million) in solar and storage energy projects.

China to tackle curtailment with new PV monitoring system

China to tackle curtailment with new PV monitoring system


The system will look at curtailment risk and provide guidance to prospective developers based on criteria such as site conditions, regional subsidy levels and local government support.
The information will help to shape the establishment of the government’s yearly PV installation quotas, according to an online statement. The authorities may reduce quotas for areas in which large amounts of solar capacity have gone to waste.
Bloomberg New Energy Finance (BNEF) has estimated that roughly 3.28 terawatt-hours of solar capacity was curtailed from the Chinese grid in 2016.
The curtailment of other clean-energy projects, including wind farms, has also been a significant problem for years. However, the NEA unveiled plans at the beginning of this year to facilitate CNY 2.5 trillion ($378.6 billion) of new investment in solar, wind, hydroelectric and nuclear power projects through the end of this decade.
PV developers completed roughly 24.4 GW of solar projects in the first half of this year, according to NEA data. New capacity additions rose 9% year on year in the January-June period. The country’s cumulative PV installations reached about 77.8 GW at the end of 2016, according to the International Renewable Energy Agency (IRENA).
Last month, the NEA and the National Development and Reform Commission (NDRC) announced plans to set up a new wholesale market for distributed-generation (DG) electricity on a pilot basis in the first quarter of 2018. The NEA said that the government will assess the trading system, under which project owners will directly sell electricity to consumers, from the end of next June.

AMP Capital invests €245 million for RE development in Neoen

AMP Capital invests €245 million for RE development in Neoen


Australia-based global investment manager, AMP Capital has provided French independent power producer Neoen with €245 million in mezzanine financing.
AMP Capital stressed that the financing was validated as a green bond, following due diligence by Vigeo Eiris, a global provider of environmental, social and governance (ESG) research to investors and public and private corporates.
Neoen will use these funds for a 1.6 GW portfolio of onshore wind and solar photovoltaic assets, located mainly in France and Australia, AMP Capital said.
The investment is being made through AMP Capital Infrastructure Debt Fund III (IDF III), which closed to new investors in August 2017, after raising around $2.5 billion.
“Neoen’s international ambition and track record of success allows us to secure significant long-term financings, achieve economies of scale and join forces with leading investors such as AMP Capital,” said the company’s CEO Xavier Barbaro.
Neoen, which is active in several solar markets across the globe, has recently secured a PPA for 100 MW of solar in Australia and  is teaming up with Tesla to install a 129 MWh lithium-ion battery in the country.
The company is also active in Argentina, where it is planning to building a 200 MW solar plant, and in El Salvador, where it recently completed a 101 MW solar facility. Furthermore, in April it announced it was the main winner of the tender organized by the French government with 10 projects (86 MW) awarded in the CRE 4 programme.