Gesamtzahl der Seitenaufrufe

Follower

Dienstag, 18. April 2017

Attempting to Revive Coal or Nuclear Power is Like “Defibrillating a Corpse”: Lovins



Attempting to Revive Coal or Nuclear Power is Like “Defibrillating a Corpse”: Lovins

By Vandana Gombar, Bloomberg New Energy Finance
Revival of coal or nuclear power would be extremely challenging given the competitiveness of renewable energy, and the reduction in demand possible through efficiency initiatives, according to Amory Lovins, founder, chief scientist and chairman emeritus of the Rocky Mountain Institute.
“Attempting to revive coal or nuclear is like defibrillating a corpse: it will jump but it won’t revive. The economic fundamentals are bleak,” said Lovins. Based in Colorado, RMI is an independent non-profit “think-and-do tank” committed to securing a low-carbon future. It merged with Carbon War Room, a non-profit cofounded by Richard Branson of the Virgin group, in 2014.
Referring to coal plants in the pipeline as “pre-stranded assets,” he said that it was possible to increase the renewable energy share all the way up to 100% for a country without adding storage assets: “A portfolio of variable renewables, properly designed and run, probably requires less storage and backup than utilities have already bought and installed to manage the intermittency of their big thermal units.”
Lovins is currently helping the Indian government hone its strategy for 100% vehicle electrification by 2030. India may opt for a batteryswap model for two-wheelers, three-wheelers and four-wheeled vehicles so the “price of the battery is not built into the price of your electric vehicle upfront but you pay it by the kilometer,” he said. Earlier attempts at battery-swap models, such as by Better Place in Israel, have not been successful.
This is an extract from an interview published in BNEF's new monthly deals publication: New Energy Deals.
BNEF: You are working with the Indian government on “transformative mobility solutions”. Can you give some details about that?
Lovins:
Almost a year ago, Minister Piyush Goyal floated the idea that India might be able to move very quickly towards 100% electric vehicles. Since then, the government has explored not just electrification pathways but an integrated transformation of mobility services. It encompasses everything from urban planning through manufacturing of electric vehicles— two-, three-, and four-wheelers—to the smart grid integration of electric vehicle charging and the accompanying regulatory and business model changes. It will also take advantage of India’s mastery of the infotech sector.
Integrating these innovations is a high priority for India’s government under Prime Minster Narendra Modi. Our role has been to support NITI Aayog, the strategic-planning agency chaired by the Prime Minister. We think India has the opportunity to decouple from the personal vehicle ownership model. At the roughly 90-person Delhi workshop we organized with NITI Aayog at the end of February, five cabinet ministers appeared and thoughtfully engaged—a strong signal of the intent of the government of India...
Kommentar veröffentlichen